Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0279-3695 / 1938-2413
Published by: SLACK, Inc. (10.3928)
Total articles ≅ 8,731
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Latest articles in this journal

Rosa Georgina Pérez-Castillo, Mireya Zamora-Macorra, Irina Lazarevich
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 31-37; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210623-05

Abstract:
Nursing staff in public hospitals face highly demanding working conditions, which are related to mental health and eating problems. The current study aimed to identify the most frequent work characteristics associated with mental health problems and eating behavior in nursing staff. A cross-sectional study was performed on a random sample of 190 nurses at a specialized hospital in Mexico City. Work characteristics, mental health problems (stress, depression, and anxiety), emotional eating, and loss-of-control eating were measured using standardized scales. Associations among relevant work variables and mental health and eating behavior were assessed using logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. High prevalence of stress (28%), depression (35%), anxiety (33%), emotional eating (27%), and loss-of-control eating (38%) were found. These mental health problems have been associated with variables related to work overload, little appreciation of work, and exposure to the suffering and death of patients. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].
Xuan Zhang, Jiwei Sun, Meng Sun, Juan Wang, Yanyan Li, Liuliu Wu, Fangxiang Mao, Fenglin Cao, Xiaorong Luan
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 17-22; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210623-03

Abstract:
The current study aimed to identify the main stressors inherent to caring for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and associated mental health outcomes among frontline health care workers. Data were collected via an online questionnaire from 651 frontline health care workers providing direct medical services for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Participants reported the stressors inherent to caring for patients with COVID-19, including depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analysis. The most common stressors were "Worry about being negligent and endangering coworkers" (76.2%), "Worry about getting infected" (74.7%), and "Protective gear causing physical discomfort" (73.6%). "Conflict between duty and safety" and "Protective gear causing physical discomfort" were linked to high risk of depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Findings suggest that frontline health care workers may develop adverse mental health outcomes in the face of certain stressors, requiring targeted interventions. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].
Olimpia Paun
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 11-12; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20211207-03

Duygu Murat, Halit Necmi Uçar, Şafak Eray
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 38-47; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210623-02

Abstract:
The current study aimed to explore sleep habits, maternal psychological symptoms, and other risk factors in children with childhood masturbation (CM). The study was conducted with 80 children with CM and 44 children as a control group. Sleep habits were assessed with the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire and mothers' psychiatric symptoms were screened using the Symptom Checklist-90. In the CM group, sleeping in the same room with parents, history of unplanned pregnancy, and not playing with the child every day were more common than in the control group. Sleep problems (in particular, night waking) are associated with increased incidence of CM. The simple act of parents playing with their children every day may protect against children engaging in CM. Maternal psychiatric symptoms were more common among children with CM than in the control group. By expanding our knowledge about potential risk factors associated with CM, clinicians can distinguish between desirable and undesirable behavior and intervene in pathological cases. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].
Deena Sackman
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 48-48; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20211202-01

Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20211117-01

Shari Lynn Harding
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 13-16; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210623-01

Abstract:
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has influenced daily life in many ways, with significant effects on mental health and coping. Psychiatric nurses can leverage their expertise in supporting adaptive coping among individuals affected by the stressors of the pandemic. Literature related to common mental health stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic can guide nurses seeking to support clients. The current article uses the Roy Adaptation Model and a review of the literature to provide a framework for nurses to intervene and promote improved mental health across all settings. The role of nursing in promoting adaptation to COVID-19 mental health stressors is essential during and after the pandemic. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].
Rasha Salah Eweida, Eman Ghallab, Fiona Ng, Nashwa Ibrahim
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 60, pp 23-30; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20210623-04

Abstract:
Effective nursing practice is linked to a nurse's ability to regulate emotions and effectively communicate with patients. Novice nurses can feel unprepared when approaching individuals with psychosis who show aggressive behaviors. The current descriptive correlational study aimed to examine relationships among novice nurses' emotional regulation (ER) capacity, length of service, and communication skills, and investigate the predictive capacity of ER on communication skills in dealing with aggression among individuals with psychosis. A convenience sample of 133 novice nurses was obtained. Nurses who had been working for 19 to 24 months demonstrated significantly higher overall communication skills than those who had been working for 12 to 18 months and those who had been working <12 months (mean = 45.05 [SD = 10.89], mean = 41.43 [SD = 12.16], and mean = 38.44 [SD = 9.33], respectively; p = 0.03). In addition, a strong positive correlation was detected between ER strategies and communication skills. ER strategies were identified as independent precursors of novice nurses' communication skills. Incorporating ER and communication skills training in mental health nursing curricula is recommended. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].
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