Journal of Creativity in Mental Health

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1540-1383 / 1540-1391
Published by: Informa UK Limited (10.1080)
Total articles ≅ 727
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Latest articles in this journal

, Jim Ansaldo
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.2021118

Abstract:
Students who engage in high-impact learning initiatives such internships, capstone research projects, and collaborative activities report gains in personal development that include growth in self-confidence, increase in independent work and thought, and a sense of accomplishment. These are integral to professional identity and competency in graduate training of art therapists. The authors projected that students who participate in applied improvisation workshops would identify an impact on their personal and professional development through increased skill development and confidence. Program evaluation found applied improvisation and art therapy workshops for the enhancement of graduate art therapy students’ clinical skills to be successful in increasing students’ self-assessment of communication skills and enhancing a sense of professional identity and overall competency.
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.2011813

Abstract:
The author discusses the use of music as a dynamic and practical learning platform to enhance skill acquisition for counselors-in-training. Rationale regarding the use of contemporary songs to facilitate skill development in the classroom is provided. Notions related to creatively engaging learners, neuroscience, enriching self-awareness, and embracing diverse expression is integrated within this rationale. A user-friendly 5-Step practical guide outlining specific strategies for using songs in the classroom to develop counseling skills is offered. Concrete examples depicting the acquisition of microskills for counselors-in-training are presented within this guide. Lastly, a playlist of diverse contemporary songs is supplied for instructors to apply these practical strategies meaningfully and creatively in the classroom (see Appendix).
Clare A. Bolton, , Jackie A. Spring, Melodie H. Frick
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.2011814

Abstract:
An accelerated need for effective and accessible therapy for children has become more evident in 2020 by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) pandemic. This global health crisis has exacerbated an existing mental health care crisis for children, particularly for those of color and low income who have a history of being disproportionately underserved. Teletherapy may address some of the barriers that prevent many children from receiving mental health services. Play-based strategies can be creatively integrated in teletherapy to maintain a relational, developmentally appropriate, and evidence-based approach to working with children in a virtual setting. In this article, creative ways to facilitate virtual play-based strategies are provided. Specific information about set-up, accessibility, selectability, scaffolding technology, developmental and cultural considerations, limit setting, and documentation for virtual sessions is discussed. Access to creative and theoretically informed teletherapy practices will strengthen the mental health response needed to reduce disparities in care.
Harprit Kaur,
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.2000910

Abstract:
The study examines the efficacy of “Six Thinking Dupatta Skills” as a problem-solving skill for the prevention of suicide in wives who were grieving of Bathinda district (Punjab) who had lost their husbands because of suicide. It was hypothesized that this method would be effective in alleviating suicidal ideation, grief, depression and build resilience in them. Three wives who were grieving wives (average age 45.22 years old) from the Bathinda district of Punjab (India) were given “Six Thinking Dupatta Skills” as problem-solving skills in five stages. The findings suggest the ‘Six thinking Dupatta Skills can be effective as problem-solving skills at the time of grieving situations.
, Rachel Worthington
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1987367

Abstract:
With an increasing public interest in the roleplaying game ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ (D&D) comes the claim it holds psychological benefits. While the therapeutic roleplay is empirically well established, the evidence surrounding D&D is unclear. The current study aims to summarize the literature pertaining to this topic and present possible avenues for the implementation of D&D in psychological interventions. A Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) was conducted following the standards by the Center for Evidence-Based Management. Relevant search strings were entered into seven databases (e.g., PsycArticles, PsycInfo, Child Development & Adolescent Studies). Only papers published in the English language till September 2020 were considered and their quality appraised. The thematic analysis of 13 studies yielded four themes: No unified personality type of D&D players, stakeholders’ attitude about D&D, lack of maladaptive coping associated with D&D, and potential psychological benefits of D&D. The results appear promising, but preliminary. Practical implications are contextualized with the wider literature.
, Natoya Haskins, , Aiesha Lee
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1999359

Abstract:
Black women face significant stressors that impact their emotional and mental health. Counselors have a unique opportunity to provide culturally responsive and affirming counseling that works toward the liberation of Black women from oppression, marginalization, and psychological distress. However, there is not a current theory that specifically addresses the nuances of Black women’s experiences, focusing especially on the vital relevance of religion and spirituality. To that end, we propose an integrated model of Relational Cultural Theory and Womanist Theology. This article provides an outline of the proposed model, suggestions for therapeutic application, and considerations for counselors.
, Kristi L. Perryman
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1988024

Abstract:
Counseling governing bodies have clearly defined what should be prioritized in multicultural counseling courses, including students’ multicultural knowledge and awareness; however, best practice regarding how to teach these multicultural concepts has largely been left up to the counselor educator. This phenomenological study explored the lived experience of master’s level counseling students who participated in weekly expressive arts activities as a part of a diversity class and offers a best practice model for implementing ethical and effective experiential learning using expressive arts techniques.
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-30; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1972885

Abstract:
Alcoholism is a serious problem that is difficult to treat. This study investigated the effects of group counseling utilizing narrative therapy on self-esteem, stress response, and insight for alcoholism. We utilized a nonequivalent control group, non-synchronized design. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, Chi-squared test, independent and paired t-tests, and repeated measures ANOVA. The experimental group showed significant improvements in self-esteem (F = 14.03, p< .001), stress response (F = 4.31, p<.05), and insight (F = 21.27, p< .001) after the intervention compared with the control group. Additionally, there were significant improvements in self-esteem (t = −6.32, p< .05), stress response (t = 4.93, p< .05), and insight (t = −5.02, p<. 05) within the experimental group after the intervention. Thus, narrative therapy is recommended as an autonomous regulation approach for developing strengths necessary to refrain from alcoholism.
, Joe Perez, Sean Green, Colleen Odell
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1986187

Abstract:
This qualitative and phenomenological study investigated the experiences of eleven counselors-in-training (CITs) exposed to four live computer-projected scenes and sounds of nature (running stream, snowy mountain landscape, campfire in the forest, and ocean setting) at the start of their practicum classes. The researchers sought to explore the subjective experiences of the CIT’s exposed to the technology-driven natural environment at the beginning of four consecutive practicum meetings. The findings suggest that technology can be harnessed to catalyze many of the same benefits that prior counselor education-based research indicates can be derived from engagement with the natural world: a decrease in negative emotional states that block learning and engagement, an increased sense of connectedness to class peers, and an enhanced recognition of the importance of self-care and personal wellness. Implications for counselor education programs, counselor educators, and counseling students are explored.
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