Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0034-3552 / 1538-4853
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 759
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Katherine J. Inge, Adam P. Sima, Tim Riesen, Paul Wehman, Nancy Brooks-Lane
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221088256

Abstract:
Customized employment (CE) is designed to meet the specific needs and interests of individuals with disabilities as well as the needs of the employer by using flexible strategies at every stage of employment. The objective of this study was to ask rehabilitation providers who implement these services to describe the current status of CE service delivery. An online survey was administered to employment professionals from agencies within the United States. Participants responded to questions on the unique characteristics of Discovery and job development, current use of CE services, and information on their personal and agency demographics. Results indicate that there is agreement among CE providers on critical Discovery and job development activities, which suggests that providers are regularly accessing information to inform their practice. There appears to be a gap between what respondents identify as critical activities and how well they are being implemented. Recommendations for providing CE training for providers and provisions for individuals with disabilities are explored.
Cahit Kaya, Fong Chan, Jill Bezyak
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221087166

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between demographic variables, personal factors, impairment-related variables, and functioning levels of cancer survivors in Turkey. Data for this study were collected from a major oncology institute and a nonprofit cancer organization in Turkey. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to investigate the sequential effect of demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, income, and education), personal factors (i.e., core self-evaluations, purpose in life, and religiosity), and impairment-related variables (i.e., pain, fatigue, perceived stress, and sleep disturbance) on the functioning level of Turkish cancer survivors (i.e., physical functioning, role functioning, emotional functioning, cognitive functioning, and social functioning). The results indicated that impairment-related variables explained a significant amount of variance in functioning scores above and beyond demographic and personal factors. Pain intensity and perceived stress were most prominent factors impacting functioning levels of Turkish cancer survivors. Pain and stress self-management training, psychotherapy and counseling, physical activity and exercise, and cognitive remediation training are recommended interventions to increase the functioning level and well-being of cancer survivors.
Allison Levine, Phillip D. Rumrill, Christina Espinosa, Kathy Sheppard-Jones
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221087178

Abstract:
The rehabilitation counseling profession, as an essential career, has been facing unforeseen and unprecedented complications as a result of the coronavirus-19 pandemic. As practitioners were required to begin completing their work virtually or using telehealth modalities, it became apparent that may be gaps in preparation for such a shift. It is as yet unknown what implication these changes have on employment rates of people with disabilities, in addition to other markers for independence (e.g., independent living, etc.). Implications of the sudden shift to virtual practice are especially of interest following the changes to the comprehensive system of personnel development legislated by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act reauthorization of 2014. Decreased educational requirements may lead vocational rehabilitation (VR) employees to navigate a national crisis without the essential knowledge domains required for qualified provider status. The current study asked VR personnel to indicate their comfort and preparedness in various areas, in light of the pandemic and virtual service provision ( n = 88). Items were assessed at three levels: Counselor, Agency, and Client. Taken together, the results indicate that the sample feels able to maintain evidence-based services, and that supervisors have been regularly available during this uncertain time. Implications for rehabilitation researchers, supervisors, and educators are discussed.
Beatrice Lee, Fong Chan
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221087173

Abstract:
Disability-related stress is the unique stressful experiences and challenges people with disabilities encounter. The goal of the study was to develop and validate the Brief Disability-Related Stress Scale ( BDRSS) in a sample of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Findings demonstrated that the BDRSS is unidimensional and has good psychometric properties (internal consistency reliability coefficient [Cronbach’s α = .86]). The BDRSS was also found to correlate with the Perceived Stress Scale–10 ( PSS-10; r = .69). Results of this study suggested the potential clinical utility of incorporating the BDRSS in rehabilitation, mental health, and neuropsychology settings to assess stressors experienced by people with MS.
Jinhee Park, , Jina Chun, Kaycee Roberts
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221087169

Abstract:
Given the significant role of employment on independent living and well-being among individuals with disabilities, such as those with mental illness, it is important to examine the experiences of racially and ethnically diverse cultural groups, including Asian Americans. However, little research focus has been made toward Asian Americans with disabilities in the rehabilitation counseling field. This study examined knowledge of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and the perceived importance and likeliness of receiving VR services in a sample of 315 Asian Americans. Survey questions were developed to ask participants’ perceived importance of receiving various VR services provided within state VR agencies and the likeliness of receiving or recommending each service if they or their family members had a mental illness. The results showed that most participants were not familiar with state VR services. Although slightly different patterns were identified in the participants’ importance and likeliness ratings, the top important and preferable service was diagnosis and treatment. The information gathered in this study has important implications for crafting culturally sensitive and effective outreach and marketing strategies in Asian American communities.
Allison Levine, Debra A. Harley, Allison Fleming
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221080416

Abstract:
Divisive social rhetoric and prevalent racism make the need for infusing social justice throughout counselor education even more urgent than the decades—long calls for it. There is a dearth of empirical inquiry into the ways social justice concepts are enacted across rehabilitation counseling curricula. The current study used an exploratory survey to collect information about the techniques used by rehabilitation counselor educators ( n = 71) to infuse social justice across all of their courses, including their pedagogical choices, rates of frequency for updating coursework, and professional development choices. Findings reveal that educators have favorable attitudes about social justice, are more likely to use academic journals and related disciplines in course development, and to use self-reflection and intuition-based opportunities for social justice professional development. Implications of the findings also include relevancy for supervisors and practitioners, who have the responsibility to and lead social justice education once trainees have entered the field as professionals.
Beatrice Lee, Antonio Reyes, Stuart Rumrill, Malachy Bishop
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221080434

Abstract:
Although research has examined the relationship between stress and life satisfaction for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), less is known about the mechanism through which disability-related stress affects life satisfaction. The purpose of the study was to examine the intermediary role of optimism and mental health in the relationship between disability-related stress and life satisfaction in people with MS. In this cross-sectional study, the sample consisted of 373 adults with MS (mean age = 47.77 years; SD = 11.70). Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses, and a serial mediation analysis were conducted in this study. Our findings suggested that disability-related stress was inversely associated with optimism, mental health, and life satisfaction. Optimism was positively associated with mental health and life satisfaction. Mental health was positively associated with life satisfaction. The serial mediation analysis results suggested that disability-related stress was negatively associated with life satisfaction through optimism and mental health. Our findings provided implications for clinicians to facilitate optimism and mental health promotion for people with MS.
Emre Umucu, Beatrice Lee, Abigail Berwick, Lauren Elizabeth O’Neill, Fong Chan, Xiangli Chen
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin; https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552221077942

Abstract:
The transition from the regimented environment of military service to a less structured college lifestyle can be stressful for student veterans with and without disabilities, which highlights the importance of exploring protective person-environmental contextual factors that can help student veterans with and without disabilities manage their stress effectively, leading to enhanced well-being. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational design study was to examine the role of positive person-environment contextual factors, including hope, resilience, core self-evaluations, and social support, to reduce the influence of perceived stress on the subjective well-being (SWB) of student veterans with and without disabilities. The sample included 205 student veterans (71.7% males; 80.5% White; Mage = 29.32; 39% with service-connected disability). Findings suggested that core self-evaluations and social support partially mediated the relationship between perceived stress and SWB in student veterans with and without disabilities. Implications for clinicians, university counselors, and university staff are also discussed.
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