Journal of Education

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0022-0574 / 2515-5741
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 47,446
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ESCI
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Latest articles in this journal

Alice C. Ginsberg, , Andrés C. Samayoa
Published: 7 September 2021
Abstract:
This article draws upon original research about a teacher education program at a Tribal College located in rural Montana that integrates culturally relevant pedagogy across its coursework and clinical experiences while calling attention to widespread trauma in Native communities based on a history of forced assimilation. We end with recommendations for how all teacher education programs can better prepare candidates to work in Native American schools and communities.
Rabia Manzoor, Rabia Tabbasum, Vaqar Ahmed, Junaid Zahid, Shujaat Ahmed Syed
Published: 30 August 2021
Abstract:
This study provides a gender analysis of public sector budgets in education sector of Punjab for the period of 2016 to 2018 from the preprimary to secondary level. The research methodology is based on review of secondary information and data, key informant interviews, stakeholder consultations, and a review of budgetary process. It helps in systematically approaching our research questions. The study finds gender disparities in budgets for the public education sector with key focus on reconfiguration of budget process. The gender lens should be introduced at a very early stage where budget call circulars are being sent to the departments concerned.
Madora Soutter, Shelby Clark
Published: 28 August 2021
Abstract:
Intellectual risk-taking, the act of engaging in learning by contributing an idea, question, or creative thought regardless of potential errors or judgments, is associated with many positive student outcomes; however, there is limited guidance on how to create an environment in which students feel empowered to be courageous in this way. In the present qualitative study, we examine the Harkness Method with the goal of identifying the specific elements of this complex, discussion-based, pedagogical approach that contribute to intellectual risk-taking. We ultimately present an empirically grounded theoretical framework to serve as a guide for building a culture of intellectual risk-taking.
Zachary Mngo
Published: 28 August 2021
Abstract:
The spread and influence of older European higher education models and the current Bologna Process (BP) is strongly linked to its colonial and neocolonial hegemony. However, the 1999 convergence of European models under the umbrella of the BP reform has had implications beyond the colonial and neocolonial spheres, with its effects impacting even the well-established and reputable education systems of North America. Unlike the countries of Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia Pacific, and the United States did not have any reasons to embrace the BP models. However, they are indirectly affected by it. The international nature of academe, characterized by cooperation and exchanges, has made it impossible for United States tertiary education systems to avoid the effects of the European BP reform entirely. Student and faculty mobility, transferability of degrees, and joint and dual degree offerings have increased significantly as a result of the “external dimension” objectives of the Bologna reform. The highly globalized higher education market is characterized by partnerships and exchanges, including competition between European and the United States colleges and universities over international students. The BP ultimately has and will likely continue to influence the calculations of higher education stakeholders in the United States.
Taylor Morgan Dunn, Susan Cherup
Published: 28 August 2021
Abstract:
Storytelling plays an important role in preserving historical and cultural traditions. Research proves it is beneficial to utilize in the classroom setting as well. One college seeks to cultivate an interest in storytelling for teacher education candidates by having storytelling incorporated into their future classrooms. In two of the education courses, Education (EDUC) 488—Cross Cultural Education; Native American Studies, and Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) 200—Encounter with Cultures, prospective teachers gain an appreciation of different cultures and traditions through storytelling. This article will address the personal and teaching benefits that arise from implementing storytelling into classroom curriculum.
Jeriphanos Makaye, Loyiso C. Jita, Kudakwashe Mapetere
Published: 28 August 2021
Abstract:
This article examines the nexus of autonomy and instructional leadership in school clusters in Zimbabwe. Using the Better Schools Programme of Zimbabwe cluster, teachers and school heads were interviewed on their perspectives on how autonomy influences instructional leadership practices. Results established that clusters provide schools with the freedom to determine the activities deemed necessary to improve student learning. However, although autonomy is prescribed in the policy, inadequate resources provided to schools render them less autonomous and ineffective in this endeavor. The article argues for a more deliberate and deeper discourse about the challenges of balancing autonomy and control.
Sonika Singh, Piar Chand Ryhal
Published: 25 August 2021
Abstract:
This study examined the influence of teachers’ emotional intelligence (EI) on academic achievement and outlined the model with the mediating effect of job satisfaction (JS) between the EI and academic achievement. Survey method was employed to collect the information from 728 secondary school teachers belong to Himachal Pradesh, a state of Northern India, through various statistical tools. The results of the study showed that teachers’ emotional abilities were significantly and positively associated with academic achievement of students and showed R2 61% variance in academic achievement. The relationship between EI and academic achievement of students is partially mediated by JS.
, Juddoo Shakil
Published: 25 August 2021
Abstract:
This study analyzed the job satisfaction of educators in both private and public low-performing secondary schools in Mauritius. It also assessed the impact of some determinants on job performance and academic performance, and it provides a comparative study of the job satisfaction determinants from both types of schools. A survey was carried out with 120 educators from six secondary schools in Mauritius. It revealed several direct factors that create job dissatisfaction among educators. The article provides recommendations to tackle the problems that were raised. The study concluded that there is a significant relationship between job performance and job satisfaction.
Sandra Levey
Published: 25 August 2021
Abstract:
This review presents the Universal Design Learning (UDL) approach to education. Classrooms have become increasingly diverse, with second language learners, students with disabilities, and students with differences in their perception and understanding information. Some students learn best through listening, while others learn best when presented with visual information. Given the increased number of new language learners across the world, the UDL approach allows successful learning for all students. UDL has allowed students to acquire information more effectively. UDL provides guidance to educators that is especially valuable for the diversity of classrooms and the diversity in modalities in learning,
David M. Schmittou
Published: 25 August 2021
Abstract:
Schools are dynamic environments surrounded by static brick and mortar. Schools are a complex entanglement of systems clinging to normalcy led and composed of individuals seeking growth and progress. There is constant turnover as students move through the systems, gaining mastery, seeking support, and receiving guidance. Employees similarly move often as they change roles and responsibilities, as cultures emerge and evolve, and as individuals retire, are hired, or move on to other positions, commonly referred to as “job rotation.” This constant change affects a school’s culture and climate as each is achieved through sustained efforts. When change is present within the school leadership, specifically those identified as assistant principals within their organizational hierarchy, the impact on school culture may be even more dramatic than the effects felt with the turnover of students and teachers.
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