Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1749-6020 / 1749-6039
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 562
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
LOCKSS
ESCI
AHCI
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

, Moritz Stock
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211044821

Abstract:
This article discusses online media’s contribution to the youthification of television through the case study of DRUCK (tr. Pressure, 2018–), the German format adaptation of SKAM (tr. Shame, 2015–17). Youthification is understood as the television industry’s attempts to reach and win back teen and tween viewers with strategies in production, representations, aesthetics and distribution. In DRUCK, online media are integral to the youthification in all these strategies. Our multifaceted analysis of this serial combines perspectives from media industry studies to investigate production strategies, sociological analysis of film and television to examine the thematic and narrative choices and theories of transmedia storytelling to make sense of the specific distribution choices.
, Cathy Yue Wang
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211046378

Abstract:
This article examines the representation of girlfriendship (Winch A (2013) Girlfriends and Postfeminist Sisterhood. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan) in the Chinese TV series Ode to Joy (2016–2017), and in particular, its representation of the interactions between urban women’s competence, experience of romance, postfeminist identity and class status in the Chinese gender context. Drawing on Winch’s concepts of ‘strategic sisterhood’ and the ‘girlfriend gaze’, we first explore how female friendship relies on networks of exchange in terms of economy, career and/or emotion, and then investigate the ways in which young women mutually monitor each other’s personal relationships to ensure their heterosexuality in society as a group.
Yeşim Kaptan
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211046333

Abstract:
This article investigates how Turkish audiences conceptualize authenticity in their engagement with foreign television (TV) productions in the case of Danish TV dramas. The theoretical notion of authenticity is juxtaposed with empirical material from fieldwork interactions, focus group interviews, and one-on-one interviews conducted with Turkish audiences between 2016 and 2018. By employing a semiotic analysis of fieldwork data, I argue that Turkish audiences attribute authenticity to the Danish TV drama series according to a socially created modality (truth value of a sign). This article draws on accounts about modality markers in TV drama series such as authentic portrayals of Danish TV characters and plausible-realistic depictions as a verisimilitudinous representation of everyday life. In the context of cross-cultural television viewing practices, the way Turkish audiences attribute meaning to Danish TV series in terms of authenticity, realism, and modality reveals a distinct differentiation between Danish TV dramas and other nationally and globally circulating media products.
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211044918

Abstract:
Interviews with industry workers and decision-makers are a critical method in television studies. Yet, one group of informants proves particularly hard to access – representatives from global media platforms. Why is it so hard to get interviews with global platform representatives, and what does the lack of access do to our research and scholarly debate?
Mark Bernhardt
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 245-263; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211023865

Abstract:
This article argues that while reliant on Latinx stereotypes in character construction, Breaking Bad (2008–2013) ultimately uses them to problematise American racial categories and conquest mythology. Comparing stereotyped Latinx criminals to the main white character, Walter White (Bryan Cranston), who claims difference, reveals that they share traits. In its use of Latinx stereotypes to transfer focus from difference to sameness, Breaking Bad shifts the imperial gaze to offer a critical view of the regeneration through violence myth, so integral to American western expansionism and central in Walt’s story, in that he dies in his attempt to regenerate by killing his Latinx enemies.
Richard Hewett
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 330-332; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211015463b

Kim Akass
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 333-335; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211015463c

Jp Kelly
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 264-285; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211024201

Abstract:
Video-on-demand (VOD) interfaces have become a ubiquitous feature of contemporary screen culture. But despite their prevalence and the significant amount of time we spend in these liminal spaces, these interfaces are – within the field of TV studies at least – relatively under-theorised and rarely the subject of focused critical interrogation. Indeed, it has been noted that there are simply ‘no established methodologies in TV studies for studying interfaces’ (Johnson, 2017: 124). In addressing this methodological gap, this article develops and demonstrates an empirical and quantitative approach to the analysis of television VOD interfaces, taking its cue from ‘distant reading’ ( Moretti, 2013 ).
Back to Top Top