Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1802-7962 / 1802-7962
Published by: Masaryk University Press (10.5817)
Total articles ≅ 260
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Latest articles in this journal

Paula Frieiro Padín, Rubén González-Rodríguez, Carmen Verde-Diego, Raquel Vázquez-Pérez
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-6

Abstract:
The relationship between socialization through social media (SM) and eating disorders (EDs) is a serious problem for public health, largely affecting the mental health of younger people. This work aimed to identify scientific works addressing ED psychopathologies, studying their relationship with SM usage. In this systematic review, we analyze the available scientific evidence, thereby providing tools for intervention, prevention, and treatment. A systematic review and PRISMA analysis of narrative syntheses was carried out. Works were selected from the databases of Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, and PsycINFO. Out of a total of 257 references, 19 articles were identified and selected; among them, correlational studies predominated. A growing interest in the subject matter was identified, as it is undergoing constant changes. The investigations found that EDs and SM usage are influenced by the time spent on SM, the type of interactions, and shared photographs, as well as gender and sociocultural context.
Caroline M. Marx, Kai W. Müller, Manfred E. Beutel
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-5

Abstract:
Despite the widespread use of online sexual material in the general population, the overlap of deviant use of online sexual material (child sexual abusive material) with other types of online sex and gaming addictions has remained controversial. The purpose of this study is to determine, how users of child sexual abusive material (CSAM) differ from persons consulting for problematic online sex and for gaming (sociodemographic details, Internet use patterns, adverse childhood experiences). We assessed online addiction criteria and adverse childhood experiences in 479 consecutive patients (57 CSAM, 67 users of online sexual material, 355 online gamers) by standardized self-report questionnaires (AICA, CTS). Patients presenting with CSAM consumption were well-educated, socially and professionally integrated middle-aged men. While the quantity of Internet use was less excessive compared to users of online sexual material and online gamers, their average online use was mostly addictive and disruptive regarding partnership or family. They reported significantly higher rates of own experiences of sexual childhood abuse and emotional neglect compared to gamers. Better understanding of CSAM consumption in the context of online addictions is a prerequisite for developing specific therapeutic approaches. These need to consider addictive behavior as well as sustained childhood adversities, which might lead to these maladaptive coping strategies.
Marcin Czub, Paweł Janeta
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-10

Abstract:
Virtual Reality (VR) technology can be used to influence performance on endurance exercises. In this study, we focused on manipulating perception of own-body strength by exercising in VR as a muscular avatar. In this repeated-measure study, twenty-nine participants performed biceps curl exercise in a maximum repetitions protocol, up to exhaustion. The exercise was done either in VR as a muscular avatar, or without VR, in front of the mirror. Dependent variables were the number of exercise repetitions and self-reported exertion. We also controlled blood glucose level, perceived weight of the barbell and level of embodiment. Participants performed significantly more biceps curl repetitions in the VR condition (Z = -2.05, p < .05) with an effect size of d = 0.36. The self-reported effort did not differ significantly between conditions. The results of this study may have an applied significance since number of exercise repetitions is an ecologically valid measure, directly relevant to real training protocols.
David Schwartz, Hannah L. Fritz, Annemarie R. Kelleghan, Yana Ryjova, Adam Omary, Leslie M. Taylor, Tana Luo
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-7

Abstract:
Social media use is central to the organization of adolescent peer groups. Nonetheless, a small percentage of youth report that they do not have an active presence on any of the social networking platforms that are commonly accessed by their peers. The current study examines the academic and social functioning of this under investigated subgroup. We recruited 376 adolescents (M = 14.4 years of age; 209 girls) from an ethnically diverse urban high school. Participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing digital communication tendencies. A peer nomination inventory was used to index social reputations and reciprocated friendships. In addition, achievement data were obtained from school records. Forty-eight adolescents (12 girls) reported that they did not use any the social networking platforms that were in vogue with their peers (i.e., Snapchat, Instagram, and Twitter). Our findings presented a mixed picture regarding the adjustment of these youth. Compared to their classmates, nonusers of fashionable social networks were less popular and had fewer friends. On the other hand, nonusers were relatively high achieving and tended to establish a small number of friendships with academically high achieving peers.
Jonas De Meulenaere, Bastiaan Baccarne, Cédric Courtois, Koen Ponnet
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-8

Abstract:
The current study presents an instrument to measure online neighborhood network (ONN) uses from a social capital perspective. Prior studies have provided tentative evidence that ONNs, developed on social media platforms, can be a means for residents to develop social capital. However, to investigate this claim, a quantitative measurement instrument tailored to group- instead of ego-centered networks, is necessary yet currently lacking. A multi-phase method was applied to develop and test the psychometric properties of our instrument. Drawing upon existing literature, we conceptualized two types of ONN uses: expressive and instrumental uses. Both constructs were subsequently operationalized in a series of research steps. The construct validity (both exploratory and confirmatory), criterion and theoretical validity, and internal consistency of the instrument were tested on a sample of ONN users (n = 668) in Flanders (Belgium). The findings showed that the designed instrument is valid and reliable for assessing ONN uses. As such, the means are provided for investigating the role of ONNs in neighborhood relationship and social capital development, discern between different types of ONN users, and to assess the quality of ONNs with respect to the neighborhood's social life from a policy perspective.
Marina F. Thomas, Alice Binder, Jörg Matthes
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-3

Abstract:
During the global COVID-19 pandemic, many people were physically separated from their romantic or sexual partners and added sexting to their sexual repertoire. Sexting involves the exchange of sensitive data and thus necessitates personal and interpersonal privacy management strategies such as information control and privacy boundary communication. This study investigates the psychological predictors of sexting-related privacy management. In an online survey with 494 young adults, we tested demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates of sexting-related privacy management. Negative binomial regressions revealed that age, gender, and asynchronous sexting frequency positively predicted sexting-related privacy management. COVID-19-related social isolation moderated the positive effect of asynchronous sexting frequency: Asynchronous sexting frequency had a positive effect on sexting-related privacy management only in individuals with low or mean COVID-19-related social isolation. For those who perceived high COVID-19-related social isolation, asynchronous sexting frequency had no positive effect. This suggests that in a context of social isolation, even frequent sexters are willing to sacrifice their privacy. Relationship status, privacy concerns, rejection sensitivity, and synchronous sexting frequency were not related to sexting-related privacy management. The results highlight the various effects of COVID-19-related social isolation.
Federica Sibilla, Alessandro Musetti, Tiziana Mancini
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-1

Abstract:
Starting from the dualistic model of passion by Vallerand and colleagues (2003), this study aimed to identify “obsessive” and “harmonious” involvements in MMORPGs and to verify their relationships with players’ self-esteem and well-being. An international sample of 147 MMORPG players participated in a longitudinal design filling out for 3 times an online questionnaire measuring game involvement (in terms of Internet Gaming Disorder [IGD] symptoms, time spent playing the video game, sense of presence while playing, and avatar identification), global self-esteem, and well-being (i.e., meaningful life, engaged life, and pleasant life). Results supported the presence of these two different types of involvement: Obsessive involvement, characterized by a close association between IGD symptoms and playing time; Harmonious involvement, characterized by a close association between presence, avatar identification, and IGD symptoms. Cross-lagged effects showed that, over time, low self-esteem and low meaningful life predicted obsessive involvement, which in turn predicted engaged life. The present study contributes to a better understanding of the effects between video games use and the users’ self-esteem and well-being. Furthermore, it contributes to the theoretical debate about problematic involvement in videogames, also providing some indications about problematic gaming assessment and prevention.
Jian R. Rui, Xi Cui, Qian Xu, Nan Yu
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-2

Abstract:
The present study examined how engaging in public interactions via WeChat Moments (i.e., interactions all WeChat contacts can access) was related to the emotional well-being of Chinese seniors and emerging seniors (50 years or older). Results of an online survey (N = 506) demonstrated that perceived educational self-network discrepancy of WeChat network moderated the relationship between public interactions and emotional well-being such that only at a high level of perceived educational self-network discrepancy public interactions exhibited a significant negative relationship with emotional well-being. Additionally, the interaction between public interactions and perceived educational/social class self-network discrepancy on emotional well-being was further moderated by the participants’ age. Specifically, the relationship between public interactions and emotional well-being was only significant and negative at high levels of perceived educational/social class self-network discrepancy among older Chinese seniors and emerging seniors, whereas this relationship was not significant at any level of perceived educational/social class self-network discrepancy among their younger counterparts. This study develops the scholarship on social networking services and well-being by suggesting that the responses one receives from their online network can have a critical impact on their well-being and provides implications about extending socioemotional selectivity theory.
Marco Lünich, Frank Marcinkowski, Kimon Kieslich
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-11

Abstract:
Many people engage in extensive use of networked digital systems despite concerns over their privacy, a phenomenon called the “online privacy paradox.” Although privacy calculus research has argued that the benefits of usage usually outweigh the expected privacy losses, it is unclear why people come to this conclusion. We argue that users treat decisions about digital media use as intertemporal choices; that is, they mentally shift into the future the potential damage connected with risk-taking while being convinced of the immediate enjoyment of the benefits of technology use. An online survey conducted among German users for three use cases—e-commerce, online political participation, and self-tracking—indicated that users expect benefits to materialize earlier than associated costs and that the earlier the benefits occur, the higher the amount of benefits users expect. The expected time of the occurrence of benefits and risks explains digital media use in addition to cost–benefit calculations, suggesting a time-discounting bias.
Alexandra Masciantonio, Sandy Schumann, David Bourguignon
Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Volume 15; https://doi.org/10.5817/cp2021-3-4

Abstract:
This research explores the reasons that lead survivors of sexual and gender-based violence to share their experiences on Twitter, as well as the reasons that prevent them from doing so. Using an online survey, we investigated the perspective of 94 survivors of sexual and gender-based violence. Open-ended responses were analysed with the ALCESTE method, a lexical analysis. Considering that in-person self-disclosure differs from in-public self-disclosure, we based our interpretations of the findings on self-disclosure as well as collective action and social activism frameworks. Results showed that those who shared their experience on Twitter did so to render sexual and gender-based violence more visible, and to support the #MeToo movement. They also wanted to change public perceptions of sexual and gender-based violence, while addressing violence at work and denouncing rape culture (the difficulty of filing a complaint, and victim blaming). On the contrary, survivors who did not tweet their experience expressed several concerns, such as feeling ashamed, the fear of being judged by others, and a lack of trust in the Twitter platform and its members. This research concludes that in order to understand the disclosure of victimisation on social network sites, like Twitter, it is worthwhile to complement the self-disclosure framework with insights on collective action and social activism. We also make a call for taking into account differences of social network sites when studying online disclosure of sexual and gender-based violence. Content warning: This article discusses issues of sexual and gender-based violence.
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