TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration

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EISSN : 2621-0207
Total articles ≅ 9
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Ingri Dayana, Bandi Hermawan, Yudhi Harini Bertham, Dwi Wahyuni Ganefianti
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 3, pp 23-26; doi:10.31186/terra.3.1.23-26

Abstract:
Soil water availability to the plants is a range of water content between the field capacity and the permanent wilting point (PWP) conditions. The PWP is defined as the lower limit of soil water content that the plant can extract water from the soil as indicated by the symptoms of wilting plants. This is because plant roots are unable to penetrate the soil micropores that contain the water. The study aims to analyze the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and compost in enhancing soil water absorption by the plant when the water content is close to the permanent wilting point. Four doses of AMF (0, 5, 10 and 15 g.plant-1) and three doses of coffee pulp-made compost (0, 5 and 10 ton.ha-1) were arranged according to a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Results showed that the application of AMF significantly enabled the plant to improve water uptake when the soil water content was about at the permanent wilting point conditions. The AMF addition of 15 g.plant-1 significantly prolonged the growing period of chili to wither and the plant showed the wilting symptoms at the soil water content of 5 to 7% lower than the no-AMF plants. Improved water uptake under water stress conditions was attributed to increases in the root colonization by AMF.
Bandi Hermawan, Hasanudin Hasaanudin, Indra Agustian, Bambang Gonggo Murcitro
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 3, pp 10-14; doi:10.31186/terra.3.1.10-14

Abstract:
Soil water availability to the plants is a very important physical property of soil that controls water and nutrient absorption by the plant. It is defined as the difference between the maximum amount of water the soil can hold and the minimum condition that the plant can no longer extract water from the soil. However, soil factors that control the plant available water content (PAWC) in the soil have not been fully understood. The present study aims to analyze the relations between particle-size distributions and organic carbon with the available water of the soil and to develop a model of predicting PAWC. Five soil profiles at different land units were described up to the depth of 100 cm. Ten undisturbed soil samples were taken using the stainless-made core sampler from 10 cm increments for the soil water holding capacity analysis. A similar number of disturbed samples were also provided from the same depths for soil texture and organic carbon analysis. Results showed that the variance in PAWC could be explained by sand and clay fractions (R2>0.35) but not by silt and organic carbon contents. Therefore, we were able to develop a model for the prediction of available water content in the soil from the sand and clay parameters. The model will help decision-makers be able to propose conservation and management strategies for PAWC in agricultural practices as well as for the soil moisture retention at civil works.
Herry Gusmara, Ricci Handoko Silitonga, Bilman Wilman Simanihuruk
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 3, pp 1-9; doi:10.31186/terra.3.1.1-9

Abstract:
Sweet corn is a very popular agricultural commodity in Indonesia, so the production of sweet corn needs to be increased. One of the problems that often encountered in the field is the lack of availability of fertile land that can support the growth of sweet corn. Therefore it needs technology to increase land productivity. In this case, the use of palm oil sludge as a source of organic matter and dolomite as a material that can improve soil fertility. The purpose of this research is to get the dosage of palm oil sludge and dolomite that optimal for the growth and yield of sweet corn. This research was conducted from December 2017 to March 2018 in Air Sebakul Village, Talang Empat Subdistrict, Central Bengkulu using Randomized Completely Block Design with two treatment factors. The first factor is the dosage of palm oil sludge consisting of three levels, namely 0 tons ha-1, 10 tons ha-1, and 20 tons ha-1. The second factor is dolomite dosage consisting of four levels, namely 0 tons ha-1, 2 tons ha-1, 4 ton ha-1, and 6 ton ha-1so that 36 sample units are obtained. The results showed that the best combination was obtained from 10 ton ha-1 palm oil sludge and 3,61 tons ha-1 dolomite, which was able to produce the diameter of corn crop stalks of 1,98 cm. The single palm oil sludge treatment gave no significant effect on all growth and yield variables. The addition of dolomite dosage up to 6 tons ha-1 was able to increase plant height, total leaf area, the weight of corn without cornhusk, length of corn without cornhusk, a diameter of corn without cornhusk, fresh weight of the plant, and dry weight of the plant.
Sri Mulyani, Raisa Baharuddin, Defri Kurnia Putra Sidiq, Anandyawati Anandyawati
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 3, pp 27-31; doi:10.31186/terra.3.1.27-31

Abstract:
Public gold mining carried out without permission and not organized is rife in Riau. Until now there is still lack of information about Unlicensed Gold Mining (UGM) in Kuantan Singingi District specifically Singingi subdistrict, Kuatan Tengah, Sentajo Raya and Logas Tanah Darat. The former gold mining land cannot be used for agricultural activities. To overcome this problem reclamation needs to be done on the former gold mine land. However, before the step is taken, the initial step is mapping the point of the location of the former gold mine, general conditions, land ownership status and mining processes, vegetation in UGM land and the impact of UGM in Singingi subdistrict, Kuatan Tengah, Sentajo Raya and Tanah Darat Logas. This study aims to map the distribution of land of the former gold mine, determine general conditions, land ownership status and mining processes, vegetation of former UGM land and the impact of UGM in Singingi District, Central Kuatan, Sentajo Raya and Tanah Darat Logas, in Kuantan Singingi District. The parameters observed were: point of distribution of the location of the former gold mine, general conditions, land ownership status and the mining process, vegetation of former UGM land and the impact of UGM. The results showed that in all subdistricts sample namely Singingi, Kuatan Tengah, Sentajo Raya and Tanah Darat Logas in Kuantan Singingi Distric there were unlicensed gold mining along the river flow area. Overall land ownership status is owned by individuals/individuals (people with capital) and land used for mining activities that are owned by others rent. There are three types of species that grow on the former gold mine land that is Melastoma malabathricum L., Cyperus halpan L. and Scleria sumatrensis Retz. While the real impact of unlicensed gold mining activities is the loss of river water bodies.
Weri Akmaldi, M. Faiz Barchia, Dwi Wahyuni Ganefianti
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 3, pp 15-22; doi:10.31186/terra.3.1.15-22

Abstract:
This study aims to determine the close relationship between the characteristics of paddy soils and rice yields in Lubuk Pinang, the Manjunto Air Irrigation area, and to determine the level of applied technology of farmers and rice yields in Lubuk Pinang, the Air Manjunto Irrigation area. This research was conducted in April 2018 until June 2018 in Lubuk Pinang, Lubuk Pinang District, Mukomuko Regency. The study was conducted by survey method. Data as collected through direct observation in the field and soil analysis at the Soil Science Laboratory of Bengkulu University. The results showed that the coefficient regression soil pH (X1 ) is 0.208 to 0.875 sig t values are not real in the statistics. The regression coefficient cation exchange capacity (X2 ) is -0.018 with t sig value 0,781. Regression coefficient peat depth (X3 ) is -0.002 to 0.814 sig t values are not real in the statistics. Regression coefficient levels of soil organic C (X4 ) is -0.507 to 0.307 sig t values are not real in the statistics.
Faiz Barchia, Khairul Amri, Renra Apriantoni
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 1, pp 23-30; doi:10.31186/terra.1.2.23-30

Abstract:
Watershed overcoming deteriorates in its function was indicated by increasing soil erosion and land degradation. The research aims were to determine and map critical land degradation levels and to chose options of practical conservation concepts in Manna watershed. The Manna watershed lays on 102°51'38.2" - 103°10'57.8" long, and 04°0'39.6" - 4°29'38.0" alt covering 72,899.9 ha. The analysis procedures to determine land degradation levels based on Ministry of Forestry Rule (No. P.32/Menhut-11/2009), Procedures of Technical Design on Forest and Land Rehabilitation in Watershed (RTkRHL-DAS). The results showed that the Manna watershed divided in three land uses functions namely protected forest, limited timber forest, and agricultural cultivated areas/settlement. The land starting overcome degradation in covered by 35,318.6 ha or 48,77% of the watershed based on digital mapping using ArcGIS 10.1 software. The lands that categorized the critical level of degradation covered 7,989.5 ha or 11,03% of the watershed, and classified in the high critical level were 169.8 ha or 0,23% of the watershed. Options of conservation practice on the degraded lands in the Manna watershed should implement agro-forestry models because of the physiographical landscape in this area covering by waving to hilly landforms. On the protected forest and limited timber forest should develop agro-forestry with collaborative approaches through social engineering and social forestry. Re-establishing land use of the Manna watershed based on functions of land is the wise options for the sustainable environmental concepts
Bambang Sulistyo
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 1, pp 15-22; doi:10.31186/terra.1.1.15-22

Abstract:
This study aims to investigate the effect of the road network on the results of the analysis of the level of degraded land at Tanjung Aur watershed, Bengkulu Province.The research method involves digital analysis of all the data affecting erosion and degraded land. The level of degraded land is defined as (Erosion + Slope + Percentage of Canopy Cover + Management), whereas the erosion itself is determined by the Universal Soil Loss Equation model and formulated as A = R x K x LS x C x P. All parameters are collected and then performed the analysis to produce as a map of the level of degraded land. Prior to the calculation of erosion and the level of degraded land, it is first made a map of land units which is the result of overlay analysis among land erodibility, slope and land use maps.In the first phase analysis, the calculation of erosion and the level of degraded land is done prior to the inclusion of road network, while in the second phase, calculation are done after the inclusion of road network. The results of the two analyzes are then compared to determine the effect of the inclusion of road network on the results of the analysis of the level of degraded land, either on the effect on the category changes in the level of degraded land and its coverage.The results showed that there were 690.42 hectares (4.7%) of the study area (14,684.86 hectares) whose the level of degraded land was changed as a result of the inclusion of road network, from the level of "Potentially Degraded" to the "Slightly Degraded".
Bandi Hermawan, Pajrina Pajrina, Sumardi Sumardi, Indra Agustian
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 1, pp 8-14; doi:10.31186/terra.1.1.8-14

Abstract:
Most of the water loss from the soil profile occurred through the evapotranspiration process especially when the plant covers were under maximum growth periods. This study aimed to apply a technique of measuring a dielectric variable for calculating soil water content and crop water use in the coarse and medium textured soils grown with upland rice. A couple of wires were inserted into the soil repacked in a 10-kg polybag grown with upland rice, the electrical impedance representing the dielectric value was measured using an instrument called the impedance meter. The impedance values were converted into the soil water content using a nonlinear regression model of ? = a.ebZ where a and b were constants. Results showed that the proposed technique of measuring the electrical impedance has successfully been applied to calculate the soil water content and the water use by upland rice grown in loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Cumulative water loss from loamy sand was about 4 L plant-1 higher for the coarse loamy sand in the first 30 days of a measurement period, but about 10 L plant-1 higher for finer sandy loam on the 90th day of the rice growth period. Higher biomass of upland rice in the sandy loam soil could increase the evapotranspiration rates and be the main reason for higher water use in this soil.
Tristantia Anggita, Zainal Muktamar, Fahrurrozi Fahrurrozi
TERRA : Journal of Land Restoration, Volume 1; doi:10.31186/terra.1.1.1-7

Abstract:
Recently, application of liquid organic fertilizer (LOF) in organic farming practices is of importance to prevent further soil degradation due to prolong and massive use of synthetic fertilizer. LOF provides faster plant nutrients than soil organic fertilizer. However, quality of LOF is substantially dependent on its sources. Animal wastes from rabbit, goat, and cattle are scarcely used as sources of LOF production. The study aimed to determine soil chemical improvement and potassium uptake by mung bean as affected by LOF in Ultisol. The experiment was conducted at the Greenhouse Faculty of Agriculture, employing Completely Randomized Design with two factors. The first factor was animal wastes, consisting of goat, rabbit, and cattle wastes. The second factor was LOF concentration, consisting of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% LOF. LOF was prepared by mixing altogether animal feces, urine, soil, green biomass, EM-4 and fresh water to total volume of 10 l in a plastic container. LOF was decanted to the polybag every week starting at one week after planting for four weeks to a total volume of 750 ml per polybag. Variables observed included soil pH, total organic-C, exchangeable K, soil nitrate-N, K concentration in plant tissue, K-uptake, and shoot dry weight of sweet corn The result showed that application of LOF from rabbit waste had the highest increment of soil pH as compared to the other treatment. However, exchangeable K was observed highest at the treatment of LOF from goat waste. Sources of LOF from animal wastes did not have an effect on K-uptake by mung bean. In addition, application of LOF up to 100% was able to improve soil chemical properties as indicated by the increase in soil pH and exchangeable K. So did the concentration and uptake of K, as well as shoot dry weight. Fertilization with LOF has benefit to the improvement of soil chemical properties leading to better K uptake.
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