Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants

Journal Information
EISSN : 2369-7512
Published by: Carleton University, MacOdrum Library (10.22215)
Total articles ≅ 109
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Virginia Caputo
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2812

Cjcr Vol. 7
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2813

Natalia Coreau
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2810

Manuela Clément-Frencia
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 263-275; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2551

Abstract:
Nombreuses sont les filles dans le monde qui souhaitent aller à l’école et réaliser leurs rêves. Pourtant, 263 millions d’enfants, d’adolescents et de jeunes à travers le monde – soit un sur cinq – ne sont pas scolarisés (UNESCO, 2018). Bien que l’écart se réduise entre filles et garçons, en 2016, 18,5 % des filles d’âge scolaire n’ont pas accès à une éducation. Défenseur des droits des enfants et du droit à l’éducation, The NOLA Project sensibilise les publics à l’éducation des filles avec des histoires inspirantes et des images puissantes dans un contexte d’autonomisation, d’inclusion et de réussite. Nous réalisons des reportages à forte valeur sociale pour témoigner de l’effet positif et durable qu’ont les programmes d’éducation sur la réussite des jeunes filles et sur la transformation des communautés.
Omid Milani
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 194-198; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2805

Karissa Hazelwood
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2808

Bree Akesson, Dena Badawi, Abdelfettah Elkchirid
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 98-127; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2571

Abstract:
Ongoing since 2011, the conflict in Syria is considered to be one of the largest humanitarian crises in modern history. With a large number of Syrian families fleeing the war to resettle in neighboring Lebanon, Lebanon’s education system has become overwhelmed. In this paper, we will describe how Syrian families and community stakeholders experienced education in Lebanon and highlight barriers to education, suggesting potential interventions to ensure that the right to education is upheld. The findings underscore the multiple challenges that Syrian families face in seeking education for their children. At the same time, the findings point to the importance of education in the lives of Syrian families both in Syria before the war, in their current contexts of displacement in Lebanon, and in their future hopes and dreams for their children.
Warda Batool, Marina Apostolopoulos, Melissa Bagirakandi, Nichola Nonis Jayawardena, Justine Lee
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 276-300; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2624

Abstract:
The Shaking the Movers: Early Childhood (STM: EC) event was held at Ryerson University and was the first to invite young children to participate in learning about and discussing their inherent rights. In this article, five graduate students draw on young children’s and family members’ expressions, with regard to children’s right to non-discrimination (United Nations General Assembly, 1989, Article 2), as well as lessons learned, and their suggestions for future STM events. Children and families experiences as presented in the STM: EC report (Robichaud et al., 2019) were examined and the following themes emerged: children’s ideas and thoughts about their rights, spaces for children to learn about their rights, and adults’ views and ideas about children’s rights. The authors provide evidence on how events such as STM are beneficial in understanding children’s expressions and ideas regarding their rights, and the importance of creating spaces that foster children’s rights. Keywords: Shaking the Movers, children’s rights, right to non-discrimination, children’s expression, early childhood education
Aurelia Di Santo, Katie-Jay Scott
Canadian Journal of Children's Rights / Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, Volume 7, pp 241-262; https://doi.org/10.22215/cjcr.v7i1.2639

Abstract:
This paper presents an early childhood education model that upholds a child’s right to education in one of the world's most vulnerable and forgotten communities: a refugee camp. iACT, a non-governmental organization, works directly with refugee beneficiaries to establish, adapt, and implement Little Ripples, an early childhood education program—laying the foundation for a lifetime of well-being, learning, health, and peace for children affected by displacement and violence. This paper explores how iACT invests in the capacity of refugee community members to provide an early learning program that exceeds global standards for child-friendly spaces and the nurturing care model by prioritizing children's rights.
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