Journal of Restorative Medicine

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 21657971 / 23302941
Current Publisher: AARM (10.14200)
Total articles ≅ 79
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Latest articles in this journal

Christine E. Cherpak, Sherryl J. Van Lare
Published: 18 December 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 9; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0119

Abstract:Women of reproductive age experience higher rates of sleep disturbance than their male counterparts, leading to lack of restorative sleep and increasing risk for chronic disease. The objective of this review is to overlay the menstrual cycle with sleep regulation to develop an evidence-based theoretical model that directs clinical interventions for improved sleep in affected women. Utilizing the basic mechanisms for sleep and the menstrual cycle, in addition to evidence for sleep and hormonal dysregulation, hormonal fluctuations are mapped to variations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), melatonin, and cortisol levels. Effective interventions that may be included in individualized treatment plans – varying based on the scope of practice for each practitioner – are presented, along with the impetus for future research to explore the relationship between the menstrual cycle and sleep regulation.
Krista Anderson-Ross
Published: 19 November 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 9, pp 12-18; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0116

Abstract:For hundreds of thousands of years of human evolution, high alertness was the key to survival in a predatory and dangerous world. Those whose stress responses remained active survived to pass along their genes, thus setting up modern humans with a mechanism primed to respond to threats to survival. This mechanism in the modern world can become maladaptive when prolonged exposure to chronic stressors keeps it on high alert, even in the absence of any threats. This article explores the potential of technology-assisted mindfulness meditation to support a healthy stress response within the demanding context of modern lifestyles.
Michael J. Gonzalez, Elizabeth Sutherland, Jose Olalde
Published: 19 November 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 9, pp 1-7; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0114

Abstract:Living systems may be thought of as complex, nonlinear, dynamic, self-organizing energetic and field phenomena with negative entropy. At the highest level of organization, each life form may possess an innate biologic field, or biofield. This energy field maintains the integrity of the whole organism; regulates its physiologic and biochemical responses; and is integral to development, healing, and regeneration. Energy medicine refers to several systems that work with energy fields of the body to help restore health. Many energy-related therapies challenge the current biomedical paradigm because they cannot be explained by conventional biochemical or physiological mechanisms. Quantum physics is a better paradigm with which to understand these therapies.
Jorge R Miranda-Massari, Inés Alfaro
Published: 19 November 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 9, pp 8-11; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0115

Andrea McBeth, Piper Dobner
Published: 19 November 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8, pp 19-29; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0117

Abstract:Fecal transplant refers to any method of delivery of healthy human stool to the colon of a recipient. This therapy is now gaining standard-of-care designation in the United States, Australia, and many parts of Europe for treating resistant Clostridium difficile infection). This literature review describes fecal transplant protocols. It highlights the variety of techniques used to screen stool donors; prepare and deliver treatment; and how, despite these variations, safety and efficacy remain high. It highlights the various ways to best mitigate safety while also recommending the direction in which clinical and research communities can move to continue to provide access to fecal microbiota transplant in a cost-effective manner.
Elizabeth Sutherland
Published: 7 October 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8, pp 1-4; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0108

Abstract:Liz Sutherland, ND, Editor-in-Chief of the Journalof Restorative Medicine, recently spoke with PreetKhangura, ND, who practices in Victoria, BC,Canada. Dr. Khangura is an expert in the diagnosisand treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth(SIBO). He has developed treatment and preventionprotocols for this condition, and offers consultationsand educational seminars on the topic to healthcareproviders.
Heather Zwickey, Angela Horgan, Doug Hanes, Heather Schiffke, Annie Moore, Helané Wahbeh, Julia Jordan, Lila Ojeda, Martha McMurry, Patricia Elmer, et al.
Published: 15 February 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0107

Abstract:Inflammation underlies a variety of chronic medical conditions, including diabetes. The anti-inflammatory diet, one that excludes foods that may stimulate inflammation and includes foods that reduce inflammation, may improve inflammatory biomarkers in people with diabetes and pre-diabetes. Thirty participants with diabetes or pre-diabetes were randomized (2:1) in a controlled feeding study that compared the anti-inflammatory diet (n=20) to a control diet (n=10) based on the American Diabetes Association recommendations. Diets were matched for protein, carbohydrate, fat, and fiber content as closely as possible. Participants were fed an isocaloric diet for 2 weeks, followed by continued ad libitum feeding in their dietary group assignment for an additional 4 weeks. All meals were prepared by the study team. Primary outcomes included inflammatory markers, including cytokines and hsCRP. Secondary outcomes included body weight and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Both diets resulted in trends in reduced markers of inflammation, especially with weight loss. In addition, glucose, lipids, and triglycerides all trended downward, also non-significantly and equally in both groups. Dietary change can improve inflammation as well as other cardiometabolic risk factors. In this study, the anti-inflammatory diet did not affect markers of inflammation more than the control diet.
Chris D. Meletis, Kimberly Wilkesa
Published: 15 February 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0106

Abstract:The human body is dependent upon oxygen for its survival. Yet, various factors such as aging, psychological stress, obstructive sleep apnea, exposure to cigarette smoke, living at high altitude, high-intensity exercise, or a sedentary lifestyle can all lead to a hypoxic state. Hypoxia may be involved in the pathogenesis of a number of disorders including impaired immunity, hormonal imbalances, fibromyalgia, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, depression, and anxiety. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and massage are two means by which to improve oxygen perfusion. Certain dietary supplements such as Ginkgo biloba, coenzyme Q10, and beetroot juice can increase oxygenation through enhanced blood flow while branched-chain amino acids and omega-3 fatty acids can improve maximum oxygen consumption V̇o2max. Additionally, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may reduce the incidence of sleep apnea while N-acetyl cysteine may protect against hypoxia injury related to sleep apnea.
Kathryn Retzler
Published: 13 February 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0104

Abstract:Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common with aging. Formerly ED treatment was offered mainly by urologists, but the approval and widespread use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors has enabled primary care clinicians to provide targeted ED treatment. Although large, multicenter clinical trials have shown efficacy and safety with these drugs, they are ineffective in 30–35% of men, may cause sideeffects, and do not improve the underlying pathology. A thorough understanding of erectile physiology and causes of ED and a comprehensive treatment plan addressing all contributing factors may be more effective than pharmaceutical management and may improve aspects of psychological and physical health beyond erectile problems.
Alex Vasquez, Elizabeth Sutherland
Published: 13 February 2019
by AARM
Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 8; doi:10.14200/jrm.2019.0102

Abstract:Authors of a meta-analysis recently published in JAMA Cardiology concluded that omega-3 fatty acids have no significant association with fatal or nonfatal coronary heart disease or any major vascular events. This critical review examines participant profile, intervention dosage, bioavailability of intervention, and duration of therapy for the cited trials and determines that the conclusion of the meta-analysis is tentative at best.