Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0899-7640 / 1552-7395
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 2,029
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Latest articles in this journal

Zachary Bauer, , Jocelyn M. Johnston
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221100705

Abstract:
Leaders’ perceptions of the effectiveness of their organization’s collaborations are critical as they determine current and future collaboration. This article examines perceived collaboration effectiveness—the extent to which targeted goals are achieved—based on an organization’s role in that collaboration’s governance arrangements (initiation, funding, coordination, and decision-making). Findings suggest that governance arrangements have modest association with perceived effectiveness of collaborations between nonprofits and local governments in Lebanon. Perceived effectiveness increases when an organization is directly engaged in coordinating the collaboration’s work, activities, resources, and partners, but decreases when an organization has the responsibility for decision-making. Perceived effectiveness also appears to be related to trust, relationship effectiveness, service category, and the organization’s sector.
, Kelly S. Fielding, Winnifred R. Louis
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221093799

Abstract:
Volunteers play critical roles in leading the activities of environmental organizations seeking to address the environmental crisis. Despite their importance, we know little about the factors that motivate individuals to engage in different environmental volunteer behaviors. Drawing on an extended Theory of Planned Behavior model, this study surveyed 259 experienced environmental volunteers who had participated in a range of environmental volunteer “leadership” and “participation” (i.e., nonleadership) behaviors to identify factors associated with these behaviors. Findings indicate that higher self-efficacy beliefs about specific leadership tasks, and higher past participation in participation behaviors, were significant predictors of engaging in more leadership behaviors. Higher self-efficacy and stronger identification as an environmental volunteer also predicted increased participation behaviors, as well as a younger age. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses highlighted the importance of organizational factors such as training opportunities and receiving support and appreciation from the group in building leaders’ self-efficacy.
, Thad D. Calabrese
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221092794

Abstract:
The theory of the nonprofit institutional form developed by Henry Hansmann emphasizes the importance of organizational trustworthiness in a sector defined by hard-to-measure outputs. This body of theory effectually rationalizes a normative approach to nonprofit financial management focused on maintaining organizational trustworthiness through fiscal probity signaling. Such signals include measurable indicators of overhead minimization, fiscal leanness, revenue diversification, and debt avoidance, among others. Appropriate signaling behavior may increase organizational trustworthiness as intended, but the effects on mission impact are not well understood. Thus, this article assesses how adherence to common fiscal probity norms affects mission impact, using total spending as a proxy. Based on a panel of donative public charities spanning 1982 to 2019, analysis suggests that norm-adhering nonprofits sacrifice about half of their mission impact over a 10-year period compared with norm-busting nonprofits. This forgone mission impact is the hidden cost of trustworthiness.
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221091529

Abstract:
Studies explaining interest organizations’ influence typically focus on the role of groups’ structural characteristics, such as group type. However, we ask whether the boards of interest groups can also play a role in their organizations’ advocacy performance. Drawing from management scholarship, we investigate how the governance practices and characteristics of the boards of interest organizations are associated with those organizations’ advocacy performance. To study this, we surveyed the board members of Finnish elite interest organizations and found that board performance in strategy tasks (e.g., long-term planning and connecting with stakeholders) is strongly related to advocacy performance. Moreover, we found that the gender diversity of boards is negatively associated with success in advocacy, and the frequency of board meetings is curvilinearly associated. In contrast, board performance in control tasks (e.g., monitoring of management), board size, and inclusive practices are not associated with advocacy performance.
, Cindy Lee, , , Lei Chen
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221093797

Abstract:
This study attempted to investigate the effects of perceived organizational support (POS) and role clarity on volunteer satisfaction, the mediating role of attitudes toward volunteering in the relationship between volunteer satisfaction and attitudes toward civic participation, and the moderating role of self-efficacy toward service in the relationships between POS, role clarity, and volunteer satisfaction among mandatory volunteers. Using data conducted at a major event in Wuhan, China, results showed that POS and role clarity predicted volunteer satisfaction. Volunteer satisfaction positively influenced attitudes toward volunteering, which is linked to attitudes toward civic participation. Self-efficacy toward service moderated the associations between POS, role clarity, and volunteer satisfaction, highlighting its essential role in strengthening the effects of organizational climate factors on volunteer satisfaction. Our findings underline the important role of organizations in increasing mandatory volunteers’ satisfaction that affects positive attitudes toward volunteering, leading to enhanced attitudes toward civic participation.
Alan J. Abramson
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221091534

Abstract:
This research note identifies seven key dimensions of the nonprofit sector that nonprofit stakeholders want to monitor to assess the sector’s condition, including financial resources; human resources; the diversity of nonprofit boards, staff, and clients; the impact of the nonprofit sector; advocacy activity; ethical and legal behavior; and the existence of a supportive environment. The article then describes current measures of these dimensions, noting the shortcomings of many of these measures. Two government data sources, the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPAs) and the Current Population Survey (CPS), are highlighted that contain timely information about the nonprofit sector but which, to date, have been underutilized by sector stakeholders. Next, the article describes the picture of the nonprofit sector that emerges from the relevant measures before concluding with discussion of further work needed to improve measurement of the sector.
Elizabeth A. Bloodgood, Jesse Bourns, Michael Lenczner, , Jenny Tabet, Amy Melvin, Wendy H. Wong
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221085731

Abstract:
We develop the concept of the nonprofit data environment as all data collected and reported in a country resulting from law implemented into practice. We map data environments across 20 countries and propose explanations for differences between the information nongovernmental organizations report (collected) and what is made publicly available (reported). Domestic factors including regime type, civil society autonomy, and regulatory quality increase the amount of information collected and released publicly. Exposure to international political forces, including aid flows and globalization, increases the gap, which runs counter to expectations of greater openness with global engagement. Our findings point to the need for a better understanding of patterns in non-profit organizations (NPOs) data environments; while all governments collect information, countries with similar legal codes have widely varying data environments. This matters for NPOs as their ability to learn and improve depends on access to quality data and coincides with a feared global political backlash.
Jeffrey S. Simonoff, Rikki Abzug
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221089259

Abstract:
This Research Note introduces nonprofit scholars to the contemporary analytical tool of conditional inference trees as a means to shed more light on the institutional forces behind the changing composition of nonprofit boards of trustees. Revisiting the data of the Six-Cities Cultures of Trusteeship Project, this note illustrates the illuminating power of conditional inference trees for analyzing data (particularly categorical data), not well served by significance testing. Applying these popular models adds depth, nuance, and increased clarity to some of the original findings from the Six-Cities research project. This empirical case serves as a how-to for future researchers hoping to more flexibly model the relative impact of institutional (and other) variables on nonprofit organization structures, as well as expand their methodological toolkit when dealing with all sorts of regression problems.
Curtis Child, Eva Witesman
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221081523

Abstract:
How do nonspecialists of nonprofit practice, law, and scholarship conceptualize the third sector? This article explores the everyday meanings of nonprofit organization and action empirically by reporting on a survey-based exercise in which research participants coded statements describing qualitatively different interactions between various types of entities. The survey, drawing on Crawford and Ostrom’s grammar of institutions, allows for an examination of how lay observers make sense of the sectoral boundaries that occupy specialists’ attention. We find that research participants are less prone to code interactions consistently with the nominal sectors of the organizations presented to them and more inclined to code the interactions based on the types of actions organizations take and their rationale for those actions. We argue that understanding the everyday meaning of nonprofit has important implications for theory and practice.
Anthony Sealey,
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211057455

Abstract:
The governments of the advanced industrial democracies have long provided public policies that redistribute income, and public support for such redistribution has varied across countries and over time. “Who is likely to support these egalitarian policies?” is a perennial question. This article investigates individuals’ participation in voluntary sector organizations (VSO) to understand the relationship between VSO participation and support for public policies aimed at reducing inequalities. We use five waves of the World Values Survey across 18 advanced industrial democracies to examine this relationship. Our findings suggest that, in aggregate, the impact of VSO participation negatively influences support for redistribution. This pattern of support changes significantly, however, when we consider the type of VSO, suggesting that VSO participation is not homogeneous. Individuals’ support for redistribution is conditioned by where their VSO participation happens.
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