Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 08866236 / 19449224
Current Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU) (10.1029)
Former Publisher: Wiley (10.1002)
Total articles ≅ 2,745
Google Scholar h5-index: 43
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J. H. Choi, E. Jang, Y. J. Yoon, J. Y. Park, T.‐W. Kim, S. Becagli, L. Caiazzo, D. Cappelletti, R. Krejci, K. Eleftheriadis, et al.
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006226

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Xiangying Li, Yongjian Ding, Eran Hood, Robert Raiswell, Tianding Han, Xiaobo He, Shichang Kang, Qingbai Wu, Zhongbo Yu, Sillanpää Mika, et al.
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2018gb006113

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Alice D. Lebehot, Paul R. Halloran, Andrew J. Watson, Doug McNeall, David A. Ford, Peter Landschützer, Siv K. Lauvset, Ute Schuster
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006186

Abstract:The North Atlantic Ocean is a region of intense uptake of atmospheric CO2. To assess how this CO2 sink has evolved over recent decades, various approaches have been used to estimate basin‐wide uptake from the irregularly sampled in‐situ CO2 observations. Until now, the lack of robust uncertainties associated with observation‐based gap‐filling methods required to produce these estimates has limited the capacity to validate climate model simulated surface ocean CO2 concentrations. After robustly quantifying basin‐wide and annually‐varying interpolation uncertainties using both observational and model data, we show that the North Atlantic surface ocean fugacity of CO2 (fCO2−ocean) increased at a significantly slower rate than that simulated by the latest generation of Earth System Models during the period 1992‐2014. We further show, with initialised model simulations, that the inability of these models to capture the observed trend in surface fCO2−ocean is primarily due to biases in the models' ocean biogeochemistry. Our results imply that current projections may underestimate the contribution of the North Atlantic to mitigating increasing future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.
Leanne C. Powers, Norbert Hertkorn, Natasha McDonald, Philippe Schmitt‐Kopplin, Rossana Del Vecchio, Neil V. Blough, Michael Gonsior
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006225

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R.K. Braghiere, T. Quaife, E. Black, L. He, J. Chen
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2018gb006135

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Mariana B. Bif, Leo Siqueira, Dennis A. Hansell
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006327

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C. R. Selden, M. R. Mulholland, P. W. Bernhardt, B. Widner, A. Macías‐Tapia, Q. Ji, A. Jayakumar
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006242

Abstract:The Eastern Tropical North Pacific Ocean hosts one of the world's largest oceanic oxygen deficient zones (ODZs). Hot spots for reactive nitrogen (Nr) removal processes, ODZs generate conditions proposed to promote Nr inputs via dinitrogen (N2) fixation. In this study, we quantified N2 fixation rates by 15N tracer bioassay across oxygen, nutrient, and light gradients within and adjacent to the ODZ. Within subeuphotic oxygen‐deplete waters, N2 fixation was largely undetectable; however, addition of dissolved organic carbon stimulated N2 fixation in suboxic (9 nmol N·L−1·day−1) were also observed in suboxic waters near volcanic islands where N2 fixation was quantifiable to 3,000 m. Within the overlying euphotic waters, N2 fixation rates were highest near the continent, exceeding 500 μmol N·m−2·day−1 at one third of inshore stations. These findings support the expansion of the known range of diazotrophs to deep, cold, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen‐replete waters. Additionally, this work bolsters calls for the reconsideration of ocean margins as important sources of Nr. Despite high rates at some inshore stations, regional N2 fixation appears insufficient to compensate for Nr loss locally as observed previously in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific ODZ.
Cristina Romera‐Castillo, Marta Álvarez, Josep Lluís Pelegrí, Dennis A. Hansell, Xosé Antón Álvarez‐Salgado
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2018gb006162

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D. Schiller, T. Datry, R. Corti, A. Foulquier, K. Tockner, R. Marcé, G. García‐Baquero, I. Odriozola, B. Obrador, A. Elosegi, et al.
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2019gb006276

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D.K. Woolf, J.D. Shutler, L. Goddijn-Murphy, A.J. Watson, B. Chapron, P.D. Nightingale, C.J. Donlon, J. Piskozub, M.J. Yelland, I. Ashton, et al.
Global Biogeochemical Cycles; doi:10.1029/2018gb006041

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