Poetics Today

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0333-5372 / 1527-5507
Current Publisher: Duke University Press (10.1215)
Former Publisher: Liverpool University Press (10.2307)
Total articles ≅ 2,117
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Latest articles in this journal

Herman Rapaport
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 103-119; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752669

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Adam R. Rosenthal
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 1-8; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752573

Abstract:
Beginning in 2008, with the French publication of volume 1 of The Beast and the Sovereign, Éditions Galilée, the University of Chicago Press, and an international editorial team initiated the process of editing, publishing, and translating, in reverse chronological order, the complete seminars of Jacques Derrida. These seminars, given variously at the Sorbonne, the École normale supérieure, the École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Johns Hopkins University, Yale University, the University of California, Irvine, the New School for Social Research, the Cardozo Law School, and New York University, encompass material presented as early as 1959 and as late as 2003.With Derrida’s death in 2004, the seminar publications —projected to continue well into the 2050s — became the principal source of all Derrida’s future, posthumous publications, now under the direction of Katie Chenoweth, director of the Bibliothèque Derrida series at the French publishing house Éditions du Seuil. This special issue of Poetics Today addresses two questions that are raised by this enterprise: First, how does the publication, mediatization, and mass dissemination of Derrida’s teaching transform his corpus? Second, how does this corpus already speak to, anticipate, and preprogram the virtualization, translation, and transmission of the space of “the seminar”?
Samir Haddad
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 67-83; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752629

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Brian McGrath
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 85-102; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752643

Abstract:
In the Death Penalty seminar, Derrida is on the side of abolition. The seminar has in mind an end: the end of the death penalty. But this end is not simple or straightforward, for as Derrida explores, the death penalty is nothing other than an attempt to control the end by making death (the end of all ends) calculable. The death penalty aims to put an end to the surprise of death. Though Derrida announces an aim for the Death Penalty seminar, at several key moments he is at pains to distinguish the work of reading, the work of the seminar—the work of a seminar that reads, that develops a reading—from what he calls the “militant activist cell.” The militant activist cell aims for direct intervention; it aims, for instance, to abolish the death penalty. Derrida’s Death Penalty seminar teaches us much about the death penalty, but the death penalty, as read through the seminar, also teaches us about the seminar. How does the aim of the seminar—a seminar devoted to reading—differ from that of the militant activist cell (with its imagined telos, aim, or end)?
W. P. Małecki
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 125-128; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752697

Peggy Kamuf
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 9-21; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752587

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Thomas Clément Mercier
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 23-47; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752601

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Armando Mastrogiovanni
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 121-124; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752683

Adam R. Rosenthal
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 129-130; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752711

Adam R. Rosenthal
Published: 1 March 2021
Poetics Today, Volume 42, pp 49-66; doi:10.1215/03335372-8752615

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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