British Journal of Diabetes

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 23976233 / 23976241
Current Publisher: ABCD Diabetes Care, Ltd. (10.15277)
Former Publisher: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 1,055
Current Coverage
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Latest articles in this journal

Dinesh Nagi, Pratik Choudhary, Emma Wilmot, Peter Winocour
British Journal of Diabetes; doi:10.15277/bjd.2020.246

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Leon Jonker, Stacey Jayne Fisher, Robert Westgate, Louise Overend
British Journal of Diabetes; doi:10.15277/bjd.2020.238

Abstract:
Aims: To retrospectively assess the efficacy of a pragmatic education programme called ‘Walking Away from Diabetes’ (WAD), a single-session intervention aimed at patients who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).Methods: Baseline and follow-up data for 6,116 patients, identified as ‘at risk of diabetes’ in the period April 2012 to March 2016, were assessed for T2DM status in January 2018. Any differences in outcome between WAD attenders and non-attenders was explored using Kaplan–Meier, log rank testing and Cox regression analyses.Results: During the follow-up period, 426 of 3,470 (12.3%) WAD attenders and 349 of 2,646 (13.2%) non-attenders were diagnosed with T2DM (p=0.068, log rank test). Cox regression showed that HbA1c (hazard ratio (HR) 1.23, p
Sarah Brewster, Helen Partridge, Caroline Cross, Hermione Price
British Journal of Diabetes; doi:10.15277/bjd.2020.507

Abstract:
Background: People with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of eating disorders. ‘Diabulimia’ is a term used in academic literature and social media to describe insulin omission/restriction in type 1 diabetes for fear of weight gain. The condition is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality.Aim: To determine healthcare professional awareness and knowledge of eating disorders in type 1 diabetes.Method: A short, cross-sectional, online healthcare professional survey across primary, secondary and community settings.Results: The study will report in 2020.Discussion and Conclusion: Results from the survey will establish the awareness and knowledge of diabulimia amongst healthcare professionals, helping to inform the requirement for subsequent healthcare professional training on the identification, sign posting and referring of vulnerable individuals to specialist care as appropriate. These data are important in the subsequent development of services to support people with eating disorders in the context of type 1 diabetes.
Alexander R Charlton, Jessica R Charlton
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 141-146; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.224

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Amanda Gleeson, Mark Davies, Brona Roberts, Ailsh Nugent
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 105-109; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.225

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Association of British Clinical Diabetologists
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 152-155; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.234

Nitisha Khunti, Nehal Khunti, Kamlesh Khunti
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 99-104; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.223

Abstract:
Tight glycaemic control is essential, and good adherence is associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality and hospitalisation in people with T2D. A significant number of people with T2D do not take medication as prescribed and therefore have poor outcomes. The key factors for not achieving targets include therapeutic inertia and adherence. Reasons for poor adherence include perception of treatment, complexity of treatment and adverse effects. Poor adherence leads to inadequate glycaemic control, which increases the risk of diabetic complications and mortality. There is evidence to suggest that education and monitoring is important in medication adherence.
Miles Fisher
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 133-135; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.230

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
M Joan Taylor, Krishan P Chauhan, Tarsem S Sahota
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 124-130; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.228

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Tim Street, Thomas Sj Crabtree, Emma G Wilmot
British Journal of Diabetes, Volume 19, pp 136-140; doi:10.15277/bjd.2019.231

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