Space and Culture, India

Journal Information
EISSN : 2052-8396
Current Publisher: ACCB Publishing (10.20896)
Total articles ≅ 367
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
DOAJ
Archived in
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Poonam Gandhi, Chaitanya Ravi, Prasad Pathak, Smriti Jalihal
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 33-47; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.1072

Abstract:
The process of urbanisation has dramatically increased in India in recent years. The Government of India launched Smart City Mission in 2015 which was intended to transform 100 cities into smart cities. The focus of our research is one such city in India on its path to smartification. Pune’s smart city mission focuses on techno-infrastructural development to increase mobility and digital connectivity. Social-cultural and historical indicators are not considered an integral part of this development. Given this, does the smart city mission of Pune privilege the techno-infrastructural development of a city over its social and cultural development? In this paper, we identify museums and heritage sites in Pune as signifiers of a city's culture and analyse metro development plans through GIS to understand whether the museums' current geography mentioned above and heritage sites require alignment with Pune’s planned smart city mission. The research shows that the quest to ‘upgrade’ and ‘modernise’ is not adequately aligned with the role of key historic-cultural institutions such as museums and heritage sites. The case of Pune city shows that, without careful and inclusive development plan, a full roll-out of the smart city project will exclude a large number of historical and cultural spaces such as museums and heritage sites from emerging as an integral part of smart cities across the country and render them peripheral to modern urban life.
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 1-6; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.1175

Abstract:
This brief communication in the form of the editorial attempts to draw out the parallels between two grisly incidents in two parts of the world. However, the vertiginous ferocity of the incidents jostled outrage across the nations— Sarah Everard’s kidnap and murder on 03 March 2021 and barbarity on Nirbhaya through gang-rape and subsequent murder in December 2012. Both the cases unveil an underlying culture of misogyny. The question remains how do we tackle misogyny. Perhaps, deployment of Ubuntu through community engagement is a way forward to magnify respect for women via-à-vis respect for humanity.
Sudarshina Sinha
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 134-146; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.1067

Abstract:
The novel Corona virus has been declared a pandemic due to its high transmissibility rate, influencing human life to its heights. It has affected the psychological and mental health of all people, including the functioning of various sectors. This study is based on a micro-level survey that discusses the pandemic's effect on 600 students pursuing education in secondary and higher secondary levels in Kolkata. The school students’ effect was analysed based on four parameters— school, home, a shift in the medium of education from offline to online, and the effect on the students’ future plans, aims, and ambition. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire, which was comprised of structured and semi-structured questions circulated online among the respondents. The respondents were asked to initially rank the indicators and the variables they considered the most critical cause affecting their studies. The respondents were then asked to rate the indicators on a five-point Likert scale to judge the degree of impact of the variables on the respondents.
Qinghua Yu, Yukari Nagai
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 78-88; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.966

Abstract:
This research explores the design of products based on users’ emotional requirements and how students can be stimulated to generate novel ideas in design education. In order to achieve these aims, multiple methods were taught to students during an online course. In the first step, the students utilised interviews, questionnaires, and mixed perspectives to design hill censers according to the users’ emotional requirements. In the second step, the researcher conducted a qualitative thematic analysis to study the students’ collected survey reports. The analytic results were then shared with students to help them quickly obtain better novel design ideas. And then, an emotional design appraisal model was built in the third step. The two main findings are as follows: first, creation in light of the stakeholder’s perspective enabled the students to come up with better design ideas quickly. Second, the ‘design method’ and ‘emotional experience’ themes obtained by the thematic analysis were found to be vital for the designers/students. Notably, the ‘design method’ theme can help students generate novel design ideas, and the students can learn the users’ needs from the ‘emotional experience’ theme.
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 147-150; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.1177

Ravi Ranjan Kumar, Kaushalendra Pratap Singh, Leeyir Ete
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 48-59; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.924

Abstract:
Bio-geographically, Arunachal Pradesh is the wealthiest province of the entire Himalayas. The picturesque terra firma full of natural beauty and rich cultural opulence, in its entirety, falls under the eastern Himalayan landscape. This north eastern territory of the country was previously called “Terra Incognita” till the beginning of the 20th Century, and hitherto remains one of the least studied states in India today. The state’s socio-economic development is currently in a transitional phase with variations across different districts. Considering the quality of social capital available, there is a dire need to emphasise proper resource flow and foster an understanding of the importance of the existent social capital. It may be noted that entrepreneurs are powerful instruments of development and economic change. So, panacea in the long term is the promotion of social innovation and entrepreneurship, which will give momentum to the State’s developmental agenda and address the state’s social issues. Indeed requires a motivating ecosystem which prioritises essential skills and innovation and adopts a fresh, sustainable view of resources and technology. Therefore, the present paper explores the prospects of social innovation and entrepreneurship in the state with particular reference to contemporary social concerns adopting a practice-based approach.
Ni Kadek Surpi, Ni Nyoman Ayu Nikki Avalokitesvari, I Made Gami Sandi Untara,
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 60-77; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.991

Abstract:
This study aims to discuss the divine symbols and attributes used as a medium of worship in the Dieng Plateau. The research was phased in according to Wallace's empirical cycle and was conducted in the Dieng Plateau, Central Java, Indonesia, a spiritual centre in ancient Java. The discovery of the Śiva Triśirah statue in the Dieng Temple Complex reveals new things in the past Hindu Nusantara Theology construction. Several divine symbols and attributes are served as a medium of worship at the Temple Complex in the Dieng Plateau. The concept of Deity in the Dieng Plateau is Śivaistic in character with the worship of Lord Śiva Triśirah, that is, Śiva with three faces and four hands, as the Supreme Deity. However, some divine symbols and attributes also serve as a medium of worship and connected to divinity. In Hinduism, the sacred symbols and attributes of God are inseparable. Divine attributes generally define God. In the discussion of theology, God is described with various excellent attributes. The central divine attributes found are as follows: Omnipotence, Creatorship, Omniscience, Eternity and Omnipresence, Personhood, Goodness⁄ Perfection, Non-Physicality, Necessary, Existence, Simplicity, Immutability, and Impassibility. These divine attributes are depicted in various forms of sacred symbols found in the Dieng Plateau.
Indira Das, Sujit Deka
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 106-119; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.665

Abstract:
Flood causes extreme loss of infrastructure and human life; besides it also propagates the condition of poverty and unceasing marginalisation of the affected region from development. This study elucidates how flood contributes to the socio-economic conditions of the rural people living in the Southern part of the Kamrup district of Assam. It focusses on flood hazard zoning and flood vulnerability analyses that are delineated based on the data collected from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Near Real-Time (NRT) Global Flood Mapping Product Portal. Flood hazard zoning of the study area is done using Multi-Criteria evaluation method based on rainfall distribution, slope, drainage density, population density, soil type, elevation, flow accumulation, roads, and embankment utilising Cartosat DEM and IRS P6 LISS III data. The zones are identified as actively flooded, chronically flooded, and occasionally flooded zones, which affects 39.4 per cent, 12.9 per cent and 26.1 per cent population respectively covering 1189.2 sq. km, that is, 56.5 per cent area of the study region. The flood vulnerability assessment of the study area is done at village and ward level adapting geospatial assessment in a GIS environment. The findings of the research are generated through observations, key informant interviews with the rural population surveying 1420 number of households. It reveals that 200 villages are affected by floods every year that constitutes 76.6 per cent households and 78.4 per cent of the population of the study area.
Bigi Thomas,
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 22-32; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.898

Abstract:
At a time when there is an unprecedented surge in reported cases of abuses against children in its all forms in India and the legal, social as well as educational system continue to fail in either protecting them or empowering them to face their challenges, it is essential to equip them to learn life skills because such initiatives provide the children with a variety of alternative and creative ways of solving problems of everyday life. In this study, the authors attempt to assess the changes witnessed among rural primary school children after three months of life skill education. Improvement in their communication, participation, perception, values, behaviour, and academic performance was included in the assessment areas. Activity-based participatory learning techniques like games, role plays, drama, drawing, and reflections were included in the modules of life skills, which were used in teaching them in a non-threatening atmosphere. The experiential learning method, which gives opportunities to the subjects to have a first-hand encounter with the phenomenon under consideration instead of simply imagining the situation or merely looking into the prospect of doing something about it, helped children to have a clear understanding about these life skills and its applicability in real-life situations. Reflective sessions after hearing, observing, and practicing each skill, enabled children to think loudly about their performances and understanding about each session. Children could learn a lot from others’ viewpoints, observations, and ideas too. Detailed narration with specific activities as well as games practiced, of each module of life skill education taught to children is included in this study. Results proved that there is an improvement in life skills among children in the areas of communication, participation, perceptions, and values after having life skill education.
India Space And Culture
Published: 26 March 2021
Space and Culture, India, Volume 8, pp 151-152; doi:10.20896/saci.v8i4.1171

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