American Journal of Otolaryngology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0196-0709 / 1532-818X
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 5,546
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Latest articles in this journal

Whitney Lyle, Azeem Sajjad, Patricia Yoon,
Published: 24 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103250

Abstract:
There have been previous case reports suggesting the resolution of both sensorineural hearing loss and retrocochlear involvement through the management of hydrocephalus with shunt placement. This is a case report of a patient with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) that resolved after shunt placement in a patient with hydrocephalus.
Katherine Sadaniantz, Lauren Daly, Jing Bai Qin,
Published: 22 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103238

Abstract:
The free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a versatile reconstructive option for head and neck defects. Donor site complications are rare but severe; with wound dehiscence, need for secondary closure, and compartment syndrome reported.
G. Tirelli, A. Gatto, S. Brancatelli, A. Piccinato, V. Longoni,
Published: 22 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103249

Abstract:
In head and neck surgery, sealant films represent a useful adjunct to ensure a reinforcement preventing leakages, dehiscence or oozing. The aim of this pilot study is to present the potential applications of a new sealant sheet in head and neck surgery, reporting outcomes, advantages and limitations.
, Norberto E. Naal-Ruiz, Luz María Alonso-Valerdi
Published: 21 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology, Volume 43; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103248

Abstract:
Tinnitus is an annoying buzz that manifests itself in many ways. In addition, it can provoke anxiety, stress, depression, and fatigue. The acoustic therapies have become the most commonly applied treatment for tinnitus, either self-administered or clinically prescribed. Binaural Sound Therapy (BST) and Music Therapy (MT) aim to reverse the neuroplasticity phenomenon related to tinnitus by adequately stimulating the auditory path-way. The goal of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of applying BST for tinnitus treatment by comparing its effect with MT effect.
, Maria R. Barillari, Lisa G. De Marrez, Stephane Hans
Published: 20 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology, Volume 43; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103246

, Samuel F. Weinreb, Lee M. Akst, Alexander T. Hillel, Simon R. Best
Published: 20 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology, Volume 43; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103234

Abstract:
Several studies have shown that HIV infected individuals are at higher risk compared to the general population of developing non-AIDS defining conditions such as some types of cancer, kidney disease, liver disease and others. In this case-control study, we compared the incidence of laryngeal disorders between a treatment-seeking HIV-positive population and uninfected controls. We aimed to investigate whether there are any laryngeal disorders that are overrepresented in HIV-positive individuals.
, Giuseppe Spriano, Fabio Ferreli, Elena Russo, Matteo Di Bari, Caterina Giannitto, Armando De Virgilio, Giuseppe Mercante, Paolo Vinciguerra, Alessandra Di Maria, et al.
Published: 17 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103244

Abstract:
Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is the surgical treatment for lacrimal sac mucoceles (LSM), yet variants of the procedure are several. Since LSM causes bone remodeling and thinning, especially of the lacrimal bone, osteotomy at that site is reasonably the easiest. The aim of the study is to support treatment of LSM via a posterior DCR approach, in a large cohort of cases, and report patients' quality of life after the procedure with validated questionnaires.
Jenna E. Bergman, Roy R. Casiano, Ana B. Perez, Alejandro M. Mantero,
Published: 17 September 2021
American Journal of Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.103214

Abstract:
Research indicates that most providers give opiates after endoscopic sinonasal surgery. The effectiveness of non-opiate medications after sinonasal surgery is poorly understood and most studies do not assess medication failure. This study compares oral opiate, oral opiate and topical steroid, and oral non-opiate pain control. Patient call-backs are used as a proxy for pain medication failure.
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