Jurnal Belantara

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2614-7238 / 2614-3453
Published by: Mataram University (10.29303)
Total articles ≅ 69
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Shirly Indriana Putri, Nurul Qomar, Yossi Oktorini
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 176-185; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.604

Abstract:
Batam City is an industrial city and has a total area of 1,570.35 km2 with a land area of 715 km2. Following the economic development and increasing population, the green open space in Batam City is decreasing. The purpose of this research was to analyze the adequacy of Batam’s green open space based on the criteria of Law No. 26 of 2007 concerning Spatial Planning and Minister of Public Works Regulation No. 5 of 2008 concerning Guidelines and Utilization of Green Open Space. This research was conducted with a spatial analysis method based on land cover information from the interpretation of Landsat 8 OLI image recording on 05-06-2018. Based on the results showed that Batam’s green open space is still 221.400 ha or 32.05% from land area. It means, Batam City’s open space is still sufficient at least 30% according to Law No. 26 of 2007 and Minister of Public Works Regulation No. 5 of 2008. The largest type of land cover in green open space is secondary dry land forest, covering 79.200 ha (11.45%). Keyword : Batam City, analysis, green open space.
Yus Andhini Bhekti Pertiwi, Malihatun Nufus, Ana Agustina, Rissa Rahmadwiati, Rezky Lasekti Wicaksono, Ike Nurjuita Nayasilana
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 140-152; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.816

Abstract:
K.G.P.A.A. Mangkunagoro I Forest Park is the one and only forest park in Central Java. As area of protection, life support system, and biodiversity preservation, K.G.P.A.A. Mangkunagoro I Forest Park plays an important role for life, especially for people around the forest area. To ensure this function, the sustainability of forest functions is determined by the presence of vegetation in the forest area. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity of species, biomass and carbon stock of bamboo in K.G.P.A.A. Mangkunagoro I Forest Park. The diversity of bamboo species was observed by exploration method with an inventory. Then, based on the inventory data obtained, one species of bamboo was selected based on its number of clumps to determine the biomass and carbon storage. In the present study, there were 20 species bamboo at K.G.P.A.A. Mangkunagoro I Forest Park namely Bambusa balcoa, B. balcoa var. Capensis, B. bambos, B. blumeana, B. multiplex-green hedge, B. multiplex-alphanse karr, B. oldhami, B. tuldoides, B. vulgaris vulgaris, B. vulgaris vitata, B. vulgaris wamin budha, Dendrocalmus asper, D. asper thai, D. asper black, D. hamiltoni, Guadua amplexifolia, G. agustifolia, Oxytenanthera abysinica, Phyllostacys aurea, dan P. nigra. Furthermore, D. asper (petung bamboo) was the most dominated bamboo species. The number of D. asper were 758 clumps/ha and 3,213 reeds/ha. The average D. asper biomass was 6.02 kg/reed. Thus, the estimated biomass per ha was 19.5 tonnes/ha. In addition, D. asper has the ability to store carbon of 9.1 tonnes/ha.
Christine Wulandari, Sugeng P Harianto, Destia Novasari
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 113-126; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.632

Abstract:
Global warming is a natural phenomenon that is currently taking place. Natural phenomena occur as a result of changing ecosystem balance. This can be minimized by adding vegetation which acts as an absorber of CO2 to convert CO2 into glucose and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. Each type of vegetation has the potential to absorb different carbon, so this can be circumvented by using the right cropping pattern. Therefore, information about the potential for carbon stored in complex and simple agroforestry cropping patterns in KPH Batutegi is important. The purpose of this study was to analyze carbon stocks in agroforestry cropping patterns and to compare carbon stocks in simple and complex agroforestry cropping patterns in KPH Batutegi. Source of living tree biomass, dead tree biomass, understorey biomass, and litter biomass. The results showed that the carbon stored in complex agroforestry cropping patterns fell into the good category according to the Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). However, the stored carbon in complex agroforestry cropping patterns is greater than the stored carbon in simple agroforestry cropping patterns, namely 765.61 tonC/ha and 356.21 tonC/ha.
Liza Niningsih, Sri Suci Utami Atmoko, Hadi S Alikodra, Yeni A Mulyani
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 98-112; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.811

Abstract:
Coal mining changed forest structure and composition, it caused large negative impacts on the orangutan. In order to mitigate those negative effects, it is crucial to understand their nesting behavior adaptation in mining area. We investigated 74 times nested event in coal mining rehabilition area (CMRA) in East Kutai and 123 times in the Kutai National Park (Prevab) from October 2013 to September 2014 and include only night nests. We compared both habitats. Orangutans in CMRA built the nest later than in Prevab and used 15 species of trees as nests sites intensively on Senna siamea and Gmelina arborea. In Prevab, 35 species with the higher frequencies on Eusideroxylon zwageri and Dracontomelon dao. The average diameter of nest trees in CMRA smaller than Prevab. The height of nest trees in CMRA with the highest frequency was in 10.1-15 m, while in Prevab was as in 20.1-25 m. Orangutans in CMRA nested at the height of 20 m. Reused nest in CMRA was higher than in Prevab. Orangutans in CMRA more often built nests at the peak and limb, while in Prevab at the limb and peak. Orangutans in CMRA had learned to utilize various species and dimensions of trees as the place to build nests.
Vita Arianasari, Rahmat Safe'I, Arief Darmawan, Hari Kaskoyo
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 164-175; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.636

Abstract:
Global climate change and forest health are currently two things that need to be studied more deeply. Forests store carbon, including in the community forests. A healthy forest can perform its function properly including as a carbon sinker as well as a carbon repository. This study aims to analyze carbon storage as an indicator of forest health in community forests in Pinang Jaya Village. The data were collected by using cluster plots based on the method of Forest Health Monitoring (FHM), totaling 15 units. The measurement method used is destructive and non-destructive. The result showed that the average carbon storage in community forests in Pinang Jaya Village is 54.59 tC/ha. The largest contribution to carbon storage was AGB with a percentage of 95.71%, followed by necromass at 4.23%, and 0.05% litter and understorey. Based on the results of the analysis, carbon storage can perform as an indicator of forest health in the community forests of Pinang Jaya Village with the bad, medium, and good categories. The plot clusters are in the Good category (70.61 tC/ha - 83.66 tC/ha), namely cluster plots 13, Moderate categories (57.55 tC/ha - 70.60 tC/ha), namely cluster plots 4 and 14, and the Bad category (44.49 tC/ha - 57.54 tC/ha), namely cluster plots 1-3, 5-12.15, with the percentage of each category of 7%, 13%, and 80%.
Muhammad Sarpin Pratama, Agus Setiawan, Sugeng Prayitno Harianto, Nuning Nurcahyani
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 153-163; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.511

Abstract:
The rise of hornbill hunting and deforestation that occurred in Indonesia, especially the island of Sumatra lately, threatening the preservation of these birds in nature. The purpose of this study was to determine thediversity of hornbill species in the Way Canguk Research Station, Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park. The method used in this study is a transect line with a total of 18 line transects. The data obtained was processed using the Shanon wienners diversity index formula, then translated with descriptive analysis. A total of 5 types of hornbills found in these locations are rhinoceros hornbills (Buceros rhinoceros), helmeted hornbills (Rhinoplax vigil), wreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus), bushy crested hornbill (Anorrhinus galeritus) and white crowned hornbill (Berenicornis comatus), with a species diversity index value of 1.00 included in the low category and the evenness of the species is a stable with an evenness index value of 0.62. The highest abundance of hornbills is (Anorrhinus galeritus) a beside that hornbills can be found in almost all transect lines.
Zaqi Maula Zamzami, Gunardi Djoko Winarno, Yulia Rachma Fitriana, Irwan Sukri Banuwa
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 186-194; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.680

Abstract:
Hunting for wildlife in Way Kambas National Park (WKNP) is one of the leading causes of humans and animal conflict. So far, patrol activities are still considered less than optimal because of the decline in animal populations due to frequent hunting. This study aimed to analyze the findings of forest ranger patrols in protecting wild animals from hunting in WKNP. Data collection was carried out by observation, interviews and literature study. The data collected from the literature were then analyzed descriptively qualitatively. The results showed that during patrol activities, the finding of snares was still very much used by hunters and also found elephants that died due to hunting, although the range of forest rangers every year had increased but the number of personnel who did not match the size of the forest area made some areas not can be protected.
Eva Achmad, Agus Kurniawan, Yunita Lestari
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 127-139; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.820

Abstract:
Critical land occured as a result of land cover changes from vegetated into non vegetated land or the composition of the vegetation has changed. This study aimed to analyze the distribution of land critical at KPHP Unit XII Batanghari. Critical land analysis was based on the Perdirjen PDASHL Number P.3/PDASHL/SET/KUM.1/7/2018. Land is classified into 5 levels of criticality, namely: non-critical, critical potential, somewhat critical, critical and very critical. The parameters used in determining the level of criticality of the land are: land cover, erosion-prone class, slope class and the presence of land inside or outside the forest function. Spatial analysis used by Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing technology. GIS is able to analyze and represent geographic phenomenon. Landsat 8 imagery was analyzed to obtain land cover clasification. The results of the analysis showed that critical land level of KPHP Unit XI Batanghari consisted of 3,609 ha (4.45%) that classified as very critical and 3,599 ha (4,43%) as critical land. Then, land with a somewhat critical level had the largest area, namely 26,024 ha or 32.07% of the total area of KPHP Unit XII Batanghari. The landcover was the main parameter to determine the level of criticality of the land. The openland cover type had the maximum score 60.
Abdurrahman Rofiq, Sugeng Prayitno Harianto, Dian Iswandaru, Gunardi Djoko Winarno
Published: 3 August 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 195-206; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i2.753

Abstract:
The vegetation on Liwa Botanical Gardens is used by several types of birds as a place of rest, sleep, nest and forage. This study was purposely done to classify bird species based on feed group / guild type. The method used in this research is point count. The bird species data obtained were grouped based on the feed guild which was divided into 6 types of guilds including, insectivoree, carnivoree, frugivore, granivoreee, nectarivoreous, and omnivoree. Each species only have one guild type, as many as 41 species of birds were found in Liwa Botanical Gardens, which was dominated by frugivores.
Alifia Putri Larasati, Christine Wulandari, Indra Gumay Febryano, Hari Kaskoyo
Published: 1 March 2021
Jurnal Belantara, Volume 4, pp 39-47; https://doi.org/10.29303/jbl.v4i1.448

Abstract:
Gapoktan institutions have important roles, including its functions to regulate community activities, individually or in groups, on managing community forests. This study aims to explain the management of HKm based on the role of gapoktan institutions. The research methodologies are interview and documentation study. The data obtained were analyzed descriptively. Results showed that institutionally Gapoktan has a complete administration and written rules regarding the management of HKm. Each farmer member is required to work on land with agroforestry patterns dominated by MPTS plants. Gapoktan has a farming business that functions to help market forest products. Farming management is divided into two, namely individual businesses and gapoktan businesses. Until now there has been no significant development of farming in the last two years. Therefore, the government needs to conduct counseling to increase knowledge about farming so that they can market forest products more optimally.
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