Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical

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ISSN / EISSN : 0037-8682 / 0037-8682
Published by: SciELO (10.1590)
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Pedro Henrique Salomão Ganança, Rafael De Fraga, Lourival Baía De Vasconcelos Neto, Alfredo Pedroso Dos Santos Júnior
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0194-2020

Abstract:
We present a case of human intoxication due to a snakebite by the opisthoglyphous dipsadid Thamnodynastes lanei. A 26-year-old man was bitten on the right hand and was not medicated. Bleeding lasted a few seconds, while paresthesia, chills, and headache persisted for up to 10 hours. The pain disappeared after a week, and the edema, itching, and prickling persisted for another 3 days. Although this patient’s symptoms were typical of bites by South American opisthoglyphous snakes, they persisted longer than those of bites by some congeneric species. Our report adds a species to the list of medically relevant snakes.
Melissa De Sousa Melo Cavalcante, Karina López Rodríguez, José Alejandro Lazo Diéguez, Luciana Mendes Dos Santos, Maria Das Graças Vale Barbosa Guerra, Jorge Augusto De Oliveira Guerra
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0012-2020

Abstract:
Ramsay Hunt Syndrome (RHS), also known as herpes zoster oticus, is caused by the reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. Herein, we report a case of Ramsey Hunt Syndrome in a patient after antimonial treatment for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. The patient presented with microvesicles grouped on an erythematous base, starting in the neck and ascending towards the scalp margin on the right side of the head. The patient also developed grade V peripheral facial palsy the day after initiating the herpes zoster treatment, this outcome corroborated the assumption of Ramsey Hunt Syndrome.
Ronaldo Gonçalves Pereira, Bernardo Carvalho Muniz,
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0259-2020

, Niedja Santos Gonçalves Tsuno, Luiz Celso Hygino Da Cruz Júnior
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0290-2020

Sivoneide Maria Da Silva, Bárbara De Azevedo Ramos, Ana Vitória Araújo Lima, Rafael Artur Cavalcanti Queiroz De Sá, Jailton Lobo Da Costa Lima, Maria Amélia Vieira Maciel, Patrícia Maria Guedes Paiva, Márcia Vanusa Da Silva, Maria Tereza Dos Santos Correia,
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0524-2019

Abstract:
Some β-lactam antimicrobial resistance genes, such as bla KPC and bla OXA, have been identified in P. stuartii in Brazil3-6However, there are no reports of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), such as aminoglycoside acetyltransferases (AACs). These enzymes may alter the activity of this class of antimicrobials. In addition, the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib variant of the enzyme (AAC[6′]-Ib) has acquired the ability to modify fluoroquinolones, without significantly altering its activity against aminoglycosides. This is the first report describing the aac(6’)-Ib-cr gene in P. stuartii isolates in Brazil, as well as confirming the presence and dissemination of the bla KPC gene in this species and reporting on the genetic diversity in isolates obtained from a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.
, Victor Santana Santos, Joilda Silva Nery, Tânia Rita Moreno De Oliveira Fernandes, Mônica De Avelar Figueiredo Mafra Magalhães
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0228-2020

Abstract:
Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and may result in physical disabilities and/or deformities1, which are associated with functional limitation, social isolation, stigma, and low quality of life1.
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-201200342013

Abstract:
[This corrects the article doi: 10.1590/0037-8682201200342013].
Carolina De Oliveira Abrão, Lissa Rodrigues Machado Da Silva, Luiz Carlos Silva Souza, Nathalia de Mello Bisso, Marília Dalva Turchi,
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0252-2020

Abstract:
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by reactivation of JC virus (JCV). We described the profile of laboratory-confirmed PML cases among AIDS patients. A total of 43 HIV patients with clinical conditions compatible with PML were obtained; 5 cases were confirmed by JCV testing. The main clinical finding was mental confusion. Median CD4 count was 54 cells/mm³. Three of the five confirmed PML cases died; the time between diagnosis and death was 2, 5, and 6 months. It is important to consider JCV infection as a differential diagnosis.
João Victor Leite Dias, Rita De Cássia Moreira De Souza, Janice Maria Borba Souza, Liléia Gonçalves Diotaiuti,
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0084-2020

Abstract:
Panstrongylus megistus is the main triatomine involved in the human transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Minas Gerais, Brazil. We analyzed the occurrence of triatomines in the Itaúna micro-regions for healthcare. Data were collected as part of routine entomological surveillance activities, including the species identity, capture site, developmental stage, and trypanosome infection. In total, 503 specimens from five species were captured (495 P. megistus). Adults were mainly captured by residents inside their homes, whereas nymphs were mostly captured by public health professionals outside. The epidemiologically important triatomine, P. megistus, continues to persist in our study region.
, Biplab Pal, Roshan Kamal Topno, Chandra Shekhar Lal, Vidya Nand Rabi Das, Pradeep Das
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Volume 54; https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0208-2020

Abstract:
Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis is a skin disorder occurring in 5-10% of visceral leishmaniasis patients after treatment with miltefosine,the first-line drug for this skin disorder. We reported a case of acute anterior uveitis,a rare adverse effect, experienced by a patient treated with miltefosine for post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. This adverse effect developed after 15 days of miltefosine consumption, and the patient himself discontinued the treatment. The ophthalmic complication was completely resolved with antibiotics and steroid eye drops. After recovery from the ophthalmic complication, the patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B for the skin lesions.
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