Nursing and Midwifery Studies

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2322-1488 / 2322-1674
Published by: Medknow (10.4103)
Total articles ≅ 378
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Kourosh Delpasand, SeyyedHamidReza FallahMortezaNejad, Zahra Pourhabibi, Moein Mashayekhipirbazari
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_96_19

Abstract:
Background: Observing patient privacy is one of the most important nurses' ethical responsibilities. Objective: This study is aimed to investigate nursing students' attitudes toward the importance of patient privacy in nursing care. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2018 and April 2019 in the School of Nursing and Midwifery of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. One hundred and fifty nursing students responded to the study questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: A total of 142 nursing students with a mean age of 21.91 ± 4.67 years participated in this study. A majority of the students (63.5%) were female, 82.2% were single and 31.8% had clinical experience. The mean students' attitudes scores were, respectively, 8.36 ± 1.53, 6.84 ± 2.04, 6.24 ± 2.23, and 11.42 ± 2.17 for the physical, psychological, spatial, and informational dimensions of patient privacy. Conclusion: The mean students' attitude toward patient privacy was at a moderate level. Nurse educators and all the authorities of nursing education should instruct nursing students to pay special attention to the observance of patient privacy.
Sultan T Al-Otaibi, Malak A Alsadah, Hatem K Herzallah
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_47_20

Abstract:
Background: Shift work impacts workers' health, mainly by disrupting the circadian rhythm, and gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances are among the health effects of shift work. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the association between shift work, work stress, and GI disturbance among nurses. Methods: In July 2018, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Dammam Medical Complex, Saudi Arabia. A total of 250 nurses were selected through convenience sampling from several departments. They completed a validated questionnaire, which included questions about their demographic data, GI symptoms, and effort–reward imbalance (ERI). Work stress was classified into two groups based on the ERI ratio. GI symptoms were categorized into three indices: total, upper, and lower GI. The sampling plan was designed to cover most of the shifts in the included departments throughout nonspecified dates. The daytime nurses' group was selected from the same hospital as a comparison group to the shift workers. Means and standard deviations were calculated for continuous variables and frequencies and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. The associations were assessed using the Chi-squares and analysis of variance. Results: Work stress among nurses, as measured by the ERI scale, was strongly associated with both upper and lower GI symptoms, with odds ratios of 5.7 (CI: 3.3–7.9) and 2.2 (CI: 1.8–4.3), respectively. The total GI symptom score of the shift workers was greater than that for the daytime workers, with means of 7.8 ± 6.9 and 5.4 ± 5.1, respectively (P = 0.005). Multivariable regression analysis showed that ERI was associated with both lower and upper GI symptoms after adjusting for shift work and years on the job. Conclusions: Shift work was associated with the high prevalence of GI symptoms. Stress (ERI) increased the risk for GI disturbance. Controlling work stress is necessary because it affects nurses' physical and social health, as well as their performances at work and the quality of care they provide.
Naser Parizad, Sima Pourteimour, Hossein Jamshidi
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_34_20

Abstract:
Background: Clinical self-efficacy (CSE) plays a pivotal role in safe and quality nursing care delivery. Clinical Belongingness (CB) is a major factor in the clinical practice of nursing students. Objective: This study aimed to assess CSE and CB and their relationship among nursing students. Methods: This descriptive, correlational study was conducted in 2019 in the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery of Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran. Participants were 216 eligible 3rd- and 4th-year nursing students. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience, and the Self-Efficacy in Clinical Performance Questionnaire. The Pearson correlation analysis, the independent-sample t-test, the one-way analysis of variance, and the linear regression analysis were performed for the data analysis. Results: The total mean scores of CSE and CB were, respectively, 134.02 ± 20.62 and 121 ± 16.79, indicating moderate CSE and high CB. CB had significant positive correlation with CSE and was a significant predictor of it (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Nursing students have high CB and moderate CSE, and their CB is a significant positive predictor of their CSE. University authorities are recommended to develop clear strategies to improve nursing students' CSE through improving their CB.
Esmaiel Maghsoodi, Nishteman Alidoost, Omid Naseri, Aylin Jahanban, MasumehHemmati Maslakpak, Banafshe Maghsoudi
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_51_19

AhmedKhalid Ali, SamiAbdo Radman Al-Dubai, MohammedAdeeb Shahin, AmiraIbrahim Mohamed Al-Othmali, DuoaaSeddiq Abdoh, ZeidanAbdu Zeidan
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_73_20

Arash Jenabian, Narges Mardaneh, Ladan Fattah Moghaddam
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_110_19

Abstract:
Background: Chemotherapy is the most common modality for cancer management, but it is associated with many side effects. Objectives: This study evaluated the effects of Thai massage on comfort and symptoms among female cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted in 2017–2018 with a two-group pre-posttest design. Participants were sixty female patients with cancer selected from Bu-Ali Hospital in Tehran, Iran, and randomly allocated to a control and an intervention group. Participants in the control group received routine care, while their counterparts in the intervention group received both routine care and ten-session massage therapy. A demographic questionnaire, the Kolcaba's General Comfort Questionnaire, and the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale were used for data collection. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square, Fisher's exact, independent-samples t, and paired-samples t-tests. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the groups respecting the pretest mean scores of comfort and symptoms (P > 0.05). After the intervention, the mean score of comfort in the control group was statistically significantly greater than the intervention group (137.4 ± 6.8 vs. 131.53 ± 9.61; P = 0.008). Moreover, the posttest mean scores of pain, fatigue, nausea, depression, anxiety, and drowsiness in the intervention group were significantly less than the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Massage therapy is effective in significantly reducing symptoms among female cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.
Kian Norouzi Tabrizi, Moloud Farmahini-Farahani, Hamid Reza Khankeh, Mohammadali Hosseini, Asghar Dalvandi
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_102_19

Abstract:
Background: Transition of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) from hospital to home often involves a shift in caregiving responsibility from health-care providers to family caregivers. Poor care transition may lead to poor care-related outcomes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore experiences of care transition from hospital to home among the family caregivers of patients with SCI. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in 2018–2019. Participants were 17 family caregivers of patients with SCI who were purposively recruited from two specialty SCI care centers in Iran. In-depth semi-structured interviews were held for data collection. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results: The following four main categories were developed during data analysis: lack of knowledge (with two subcategories), excruciating care (with two subcategories), emotional burden of caregiving (with three subcategories), and need for support (with two subcategories). The nine subcategories of these main categories were lack of medical and care-related information, seeking for information, heavy burden of daily caregiving, need for providing professional care at home, feelings of sadness and sorrow, feeling of insufficiency, restriction of life, limited support by family members and relatives, and limited financial support by the government. Conclusion: Family caregivers of patients with SCI experience many challenges and problems during care transition from hospital to home, which can affect the quality of their care services for their patients. Therefore, they need ongoing support throughout the process of care.
Bahareh Akbarzadeh, Leila Valizadeh, Shahrzad Ghiyasvandiyan, Zahra KuchakiNejad, Vahid Zamanzadeh, Parvaneh Aghajari, Faranak Jabbarzadeh, Maureen Crowley
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_94_18

Abstract:
Background: The short course of baccalaureate nursing program and overcrowding of clinical settings restrict the development of pediatric peripheral venous catheter (PVC) insertion skill among nursing students. Therefore, better teaching strategies are needed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of role play simulation and demonstration on pediatric PVC insertion skill among nursing students. Methods: In this three-group experimental study, 46 nursing students were selected from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, randomly allocated to a control, a role play simulation, or a demonstration group. Initially, all students received information about pediatric PVC insertion through lecture. Then, their skill was assessed using a child mannequin in a skill lab by a thirty-item rating scale. Then, participants in the simulation and the demonstration groups received training about this skill through simulation or demonstration teaching methods. After 3 weeks, their skill was reassessed. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Results: The baseline total scores of PVC insertion skill were 17.66 ± 7.46, 14.93 ± 6.64, and 16.92 ± 10.38 and after intervention changed to 20.66 ± 5.65, 33.81 ± 6.86, and 41.14 ± 7.67 in the control, role play simulation, and demonstration groups, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase of skill in simulation and demonstration groups (P < 0.001), whereas the increase in the control group was insignificant (P = 0.09). There was no significant difference between role play simulation and demonstration groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Both role play simulation and demonstration significantly improve pediatric PVC insertion skill among nursing students. These teaching methods are recommended for developing nursing skills.
Zahra Fotokian, Shahrbanoo Nasresabetghadam, Mehri Jahanshahi, Mahboobeh Nasiri, Mahmoud Hajiahmadi
Published: 1 January 2021
Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4103/nms.nms_9_20

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