Contemporary Educational Psychology

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ISSN / EISSN : 0361-476X / 1090-2384
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 2,014
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, Katharina Scheiter, Xian Cheng, Kathleen Stürmer
Published: 14 January 2022
Contemporary Educational Psychology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2022.102042

Abstract:
Effort students put forth when learning (EFF) is paramount to high achievement in an academic context. However, EFF has been shown to decrease over the course of a student’s school career. Using technology (i.e., computer-based technologies including digital [smart] devices like tablet computers) in classroom teaching might be a powerful way to cushion this effect as technology has the potential to promote effort-related learning processes. However, it is yet unclear how technology should be integrated into classroom teaching to promote sustainable effects because long-term studies in natural classroom scenarios are scarce. In this study, we analyzed both short-term (across 4 months) and long-term (across 16 months) changes in students’ EFF in mathematics and German as a language in a context in which teachers had begun to integrate technology (i.e., tablet computers) into their teaching. We used data from N =1,363 seventh- to eighth-grade students in 28 schools. The schools were randomly assigned to either a tablet condition (teachers and students were given the opportunity to use tablet computers for one-to-one computing for teaching and learning) or a non-tablet condition. Changes in students’ EFF, assessed as cognitive engagement and academic effort, were analyzed with baseline latent change and multiple, multivariate linear regression models. In mathematics, short-term changes in EFF were more positive in the tablet than in the non-tablet condition and the higher the quality of technology integration in classrooms the more positive were long-term changes. In German, the more often tablet computers were used the more positive were short-term changes. The results underscore the importance of high-quality integration of technology in complex classroom environments but also demonstrate the need to examine domain-specific integration of technologies more intensively.
, Alireza Maghsoudlou, Chyna J. Miller, Peter McIlveen, Danette Barber, Rachel Part, Ana L. Reyes
Published: 23 December 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102041

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, Wendy S. Grolnick, Alessandra J. Caruso, Madeline R. Levitt
Published: 16 December 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 68; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102039

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Published: 7 December 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 68; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102038

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, A. Katrin Arens, Samuel Greiff, Antoine Fischbach, Christoph Niepel
Published: 22 November 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102037

Abstract:
Student motivation and affect play an important role in successful language learning. To investigate the formation of language learning motivation and affect, this study extended the generalized internal/external frame of reference (GI/E) model framework to multiple languages (German and French, along with math) and multiple motivational-affective outcomes (academic self-concept, interest, and anxiety). We examined whether social and dimensional comparisons play similar roles in the formation of students’ self-concepts, interests, and anxieties concerning different languages and whether dimensional comparisons result in contrast or assimilation effects. Moreover, we tested the generalizability of the GI/E model assumptions across students with different language backgrounds. Using a data set comprising virtually all ninth-grade students (N = 6,275; 48.0% female) from Luxembourg’s multilingual educational system, our findings indicated (1) clear contrast effects in the formation of self-concept and interest in math, German, and French, and (2) a combination of contrast, assimilation, and no effects in the formation of anxiety in math, German, and French. Using a subsample of 5,837 students with valid language information (48.0% female), invariance tests demonstrated that the GI/E achievement–outcome relations operated equivalently across students from different home language backgrounds.
, So Yeon Lee, Nathan C. Hall
Published: 15 November 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 68; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102030

Abstract:
Research indicates that teachers use coping strategies regularly to manage stress and negative emotions. However, previous studies have primarily adopted a variable-centered approach that examines the effects of specific coping strategies and does not address how teachers use different combinations of coping strategies. The present study used a person-centered, latent profile analytical approach to explore varied coping strategies among Canadian practicing teachers (N = 947) in relation to positive and negative emotions, job satisfaction, burnout, and quitting intentions. Results demonstrated three main coping profiles characterized by different combinations of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies. Whereas adaptive copers (high problem-solving and seeking social support, low disengagement) represented the most adaptive profile, problem-avoidant copers (low problem-solving and support seeking, high problem avoidance) and social-withdrawal copers (high disengagement and social withdrawal) demonstrated poorer outcomes.
, Ta-Yang Hsieh, Glona Lee, Su Jiang, Alessandra Pantano, Sandra D. Simpkins
Published: 13 November 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102028

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, Kira J. Carbonneau, Carolyn J. Hushman
Published: 13 November 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 68; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102029

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, Matthew L. Bernacki, Jeffrey A. Greene, Robert D. Plumley, Kelly A. Hogan, Kathleen M. Gates, Abigail T. Panter
Published: 10 November 2021
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 68; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2021.102027

Abstract:
Researchers and many educators agree that the ability to self-regulate learning is important for academic success. Yet, many students struggle to anticipate learning difficulties and adjust accordingly. Further, despite theorizing that self-regulated learning involves adaptation across learning cycles, few researchers have examined students’ evaluative judgments, their implications for students’ behavior in a subsequent learning cycle, or their effects on achievement. Utilizing data from a large, introductory college biology course, we examined how struggling students’ evaluative judgments made after a first unit exam predicted changes in learning behaviors as well as how those changes predicted performance on a subsequent exam. We used natural language processing to analyze data from a reflective essay written after a first unit exam, identifying language that reflected evaluation of prior studying and plans to adapt learning. Then, we utilized digital traces of learning behaviors to measure students’ actual adaptation of their use of learning resources. Results from a path analysis revealed students’ evaluations predicted how extensively they discussed plans to adapt their learning process. Plans to adapt described in written reflections predicted an increase in the frequency of desirable learning behaviors, which in turn predicted higher subsequent exam scores, after controlling for previous exam performance. These findings provide empirical evidence of multiple theorized self-regulated learning processes, including how evaluations of learning at the end of a learning cycle can inform planning and behavior changes in a subsequent learning cycle, and that increases in the enactment of effective learning strategies predict improved performance in complex learning tasks.
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