Journal of Heat Transfer

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0022-1481 / 1528-8943
Published by: ASME International (10.1115)
Total articles ≅ 10,723
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
SCIE
COMPENDEX
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 10 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4052198

Abstract:
Mechanistic models developed to predict partial nucleate boiling are not adequate for fully developed nucleate boiling due to differences in the prevailing heat transfer governing mechanisms. In place of the mechanistic model, several empirical correlations and semimechanistic models have been proposed over the years for the prediction of fully developed nucleate boiling as presented in this study but they are unsuitable for use in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Recently, the simulation of fully developed nucleate boiling has become much more practical because of advancement in a computational method that involves the coupling of the interface capturing method (for slug bubbles) with the Eulerian multifluid model (for dispersed spherical bubbles). Nonetheless, there is a need for a mechanistic closure law for the fully developed nucleate boiling phenomenon that would complement this advancement in CFD. Toward this end, a mechanistic wall heat flux partitioning model for fully developed nucleate boiling is proposed in this study. This model is predicated on the hypothesis that a high heat flux nucleate boiling is distinguished by the existence of a liquid macrolayer between the heated wall and the slug or elongated bubbles, and that the macrolayer is interspersed with numerous high frequency nucleate small bubbles. With this hypothesis, the heat flux generated on the heated wall is partitioned into two parts: conduction heat transfer across the macrolayer liquid film thickness and evaporation heat flux of the microlayer of the nucleating small bubbles. The proposed model is validated against experimental data.
Published: 10 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051882

Abstract:
Lasers and laser heating have a wide variety of applications such as spectroscopy, laser welding, laser cutting, and even biological applications like tumor irradiation and surgery. Theoretical modeling of laser heating has proven to be quite difficult, and classical heating equations have shown to be inaccurate due to the large temperature gradients created by the laser heating. Furthermore, the commonly used Fourier's Law assumed the speed for a thermal wave to propagate as infinite; this is unrealistic in any medium and especially in domains with slow propagation speeds such as biological media and in fast nano/microscale heating applications. This study helps fill some of the gaps in accurate model of laser heating by presenting unique 1D and 2D models of the analytically solved Dual-Phase-Lag heating equations which can much more accurately describe the temperature of such interactions in both the temporal and spatial domains.
, W. H. Azmi
Published: 10 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051763

Abstract:
The dispersion of nanoparticles in conventional heat transfer fluids has been proven to improve the performance of the fluids. However, the study on the heat transfer performance of hybrid nanofluids in the mixture of water and green bioglycol (BG) is limited in the literature. This paper presents the heat transfer performance and friction factor of green BG-based TiO2–SiO2 nanofluids. The TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the mixture of 60:40 water: bioglycol (W/BG) and prepared at various concentrations up to 2.5% and composition ratios of 20:80. The experimental study on forced convection heat transfer was done under turbulent flow at constant heat flux for operating temperature of 70 °C. The heat transfer enhancement increased significantly with volume concentrations. The maximum heat transfer enhancements of the TiO2–SiO2 nanofluids at bulk temperature of 70 °C were observed to be up to 67.81% for 2.5% volume concentration. A slight friction factor escalation of the nanofluids was observed with 12% maximum increment. New correlations were developed to estimate the Nusselt number, and friction factor with average deviations of less than 4.3%. As a conclusion, the employment of the ecofriendly coolant nanofluids in improving thermal performance is proven and applicable for turbulent forced convection heat transfer applications.
Published: 10 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051764

Abstract:
This paper considers the three-phase lag (TPL) bioheat model to study the phase change phenomena in skin tissue during cryosurgery. The considered TPL model is based on the model of thermo-elasticity, i.e., the combination of the rate of thermal conductivity and new phase lag (τv) due to thermal displacement. An effective heat capacity-based numerical algorithm is established to solve the nonlinear governing equation for biological tissue freezing. Space and time derivatives appearing in the mathematical model are approximated using the radial basis function (RBF) and finite difference method (FDM), respectively. The impact of three nonclassical models, single-phase lag (SPL), dual-phase lag (DPL), and TPL, on the freezing process is studied. The effects of phase lags involved in the models on freezing are also part of this study.
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051672

Abstract:
Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used manufacturing process for obtaining thin films of materials like silicon, silicon carbide, graphene, and gallium nitride that are employed in the fabrication of electronic and optical devices. Gallium nitride (GaN) thin films are attractive materials for manufacturing optoelectronic device applications due to their wide band gap and superb optoelectronic performance. The reliability and durability of the devices depend on the quality of the thin films. The metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, which uses compounds that contain metals and organic ligands as precursors in a CVD reactor, is a common technique used to fabricate high-quality GaN thin films. The deposition rate and uniformity of thin films are critical to a successful and useful process. These are determined by the thermal transport processes and chemical reactions occurring in the reactor, and are manipulated by controlling the operating conditions and the reactor geometrical configuration. In this study, the epitaxial growth of GaN thin films on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates is carried out in two commercial MOCVD systems: a vertical rotating disk MOCVD reactor and a close-coupled showerhead MOCVD reactor. The surface morphology and crystal quality of GaN thin films have been examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). This paper focuses on the composition of the precursor and the carrier gases since earlier studies have shown the importance of precursor composition. The results show that the flow rate of trimethylgallium (TMG), which is the main ingredient in the process, has a significant effect on the deposition rate and uniformity of the films. Also, the carrier gas plays an important role in deposition rate and uniformity. Using hydrogen as a carrier gas enhances the quality of the thin film but a lower deposition rate occurs on the wafer surface. On the other hand, a high flow rate of pure nitrogen gas improves the growth rate of the film. However, it decreases the uniformity of the film and promotes carbon contamination on the wafer surface. Thus, the use of an appropriate mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen as the carrier gas can improve the deposition rate and quality of GaN thin films.
, , Portonovo S. Ayyaswamy
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4050923

Abstract:
Vascular gas embolism—bubble entry into the blood circulation - is pervasive in medicine, including over 340,000 cardiac surgery patients in the U.S. annually. The gas–liquid interface interacts directly with constituents in blood, including cells and proteins, and with the endothelial cells lining blood vessels to provoke a variety of undesired biological reactions. Surfactant therapy, a potential preventative approach, is based on fluid dynamics and transport mechanics. Herein we review literature relevant to the understanding the key gas–liquid interface interactions inciting injury at the molecular, organelle, cellular, and tissue levels. These include clot formation, cellular activation, and adhesion events. We review the fluid physics and transport dynamics of surfactant-based interventions to reduce tissue injury from gas embolism. In particular, we focus on experimental research and computational and numerical approaches involving how surface-active chemical-based intervention. This is based on surfactant competition with blood-borne or cell surface-borne macromolecules for surface occupancy of gas–liquid interfaces to alter cellular mechanics, mechanosensing, and signaling coupled to fluid stress exposures occurring in gas embolism. We include a new analytical approach for which an asymptotic solution to the Navier–Stokes equations coupled to the convection-diffusion interaction for a soluble surfactant provides additional insight regarding surfactant transport with a bubble in non-Newtonian fluid.
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051320

Abstract:
We develop a two-dimensional model for the transient diffusion of gas from the cavities in ridge-type structured surfaces to a quiescent liquid suspended above them in the Cassie state to predict the location of the liquid vapor-interface (meniscus) as a function of time. The transient diffusion equation is numerically solved by a Chebyshev collocation (spectral) method coupled to the Young–Laplace equation and the ideal gas law. We capture the effects of variable meniscus curvature and, subsequently, when applicable, movement of triple contact lines. Results are presented for the evolution of the dissolved gas concentration field in the liquid and, when applicable, the time it takes for a meniscus to depin and that for longevity, i.e., the onset of the Cassie to Wenzel state transition. Two configurations are examined; viz., one where an impermeable membrane pressurizes the liquid above the ridges and one where hydrostatic pressure is considered and the top of the liquid is exposed to noncondensible gas.
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051323

Abstract:
Nanobubbles are typically classified as gas/vapor phase cavities in an aqueous solution with a characteristic length of approximately 100 nanometers (nm). The theoretical lifetime of these nanobubbles has been estimated to be less than ∼1 μs at a diameter of 100 nm based upon the Young-Laplace pressure, but experimental observations have been reported that indicate that they may exist for many hours, or even days. These nanobubbles can be generated by a number of different methods, such as solvent exchange, pressure and/or temperature variations, chemical reactions, or through the electron beam radiolysis of water. The imaging methods utilized to observe these nanobubbles have evolved from low temporal resolution/high spatial resolution, using atomic force microscopy (AFM); or low spatial resolution/high temporal resolution, using optical microscopy (X-rays); or finally, high spatial/high temporal resolution using more recent electron microscopy techniques. A review of the various methods utilized in the nucleation of nanobubbles and the different imaging technologies utilized, along with a summary of the most recent experimental and theoretical investigations of the dynamic behavior and processes of these nanobubbles, including nanobubble growth, nanobubble collapse, and nanobubble coalescence, are presented, discussed and summarized.
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051321

Abstract:
An experimental study of bubble growth from submerged orifice plates in pools of water is carried out to scale and correlate the effects of surface wettability and orifice diameter D0 on ebullience. Measurements of bubble growth on surfaces with nine different contact angles (38 deg ≤ θ ≤ 128 deg) and varying air flow rates (1–300 ml/min) were made using high speed videography and image processing. In the static or constant-volume regime, below a critical contact angle θc, the bubble base remains attached to the orifice, and the equivalent departure diameter Db is independent of θ. On the other hand, above the critical contact angle, the bubble base spreads on the surface resulting in larger Db. For θ > θc, Db is strongly dependent on θ and increases with it. Using minimum energy method, it is shown that the wettability effects can be scaled and correlated by a modified capillary length, defined as a function of the Laplace length and contact angle. The proposed correlation provides predictions of Db that agree with experimental data of this study as well as those available in the literature to within ±15%. Moreover, for a hydrophobic surface when D0 > twice the modified capillary length, the bubble grows inside the orifice; for a hydrophilic surface, this scales with twice the capillary length, and effect of θ is not seen.
Published: 8 September 2021
Journal of Heat Transfer, Volume 143; https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4051056

Abstract:
Boiling heat transfer suffers deteriorations under subatmospheric conditions, which can be attributed to a shortage of viable nucleation sites at declining pressures. In this work, the possibility of enhancing low-pressure saturated boiling of water using a combination of wettability patterning and structural modifications was experimentally explored. The copper test surface, comprised of an array of circular “dimples” (0.3 mm in depth, 0.5 mm in diameter, and 3.0 mm in pitch), was spray-coated by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coatings so as to form a matching biphilic pattern with the surface cavities. The resulting dimpled biphilic surface showed appreciable heat transfer enhancement—with a maximum 60% increase of the average heat transfer coefficient of nucleate boiling compared with a flat biphilic surface—down to about 9.5 kPa. Further lowering the pressure to 7.8 kPa, however, was found to lead to diminished performance gains. The visualization study of the bubble departure dynamics revealed signs of additional vapor trapping of the hydrophobic-coated cavities, which can induce uninterrupted bubble regeneration with zero waiting time and explain the qualified enhancement of subatmospheric boiling. Thanks to a potential secondary pinning of contact line inside the hydrophobic cavities, incomplete bubble detachment could prevail at somewhat lower pressures than was otherwise possible without the dimple structure, leaving behind significantly more vapor residues. However, the vapor-trapping capacity was found to decrease with pressure, which provided clues with regard to the reduced efficacy of the surface at even lower pressures.
Back to Top Top