Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie

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ISSN : 0008-4255
Total articles ≅ 1,981
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Peter de Graef, Andreas de Troy, Géry D'Ydewalle
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 489-508; https://doi.org/10.1037/h0084324

Abstract:
Objects likely to appear in a given real-world scene are frequently found to be easier to recognize. Two different sources of contextual information have been proposed as the basis for this effect: global scene background and individual companion objects. The present paper examines the relative importance of these two elements in explaining the context-sensitivity of object identification in full scenes. Specific sequences of object fixations were elicited during free scene exploration, while fixation times on designated target objects were recorded as a measure of ease of target identification. Episodic consistency between the target, the global scene background, and the object fixated just prior to the target (the prime), were manipulated orthogonally. Target fixation times were examined for effects of prime and background. Analyses show effects of both factors, which are modulated by the chronology and spatial extent of scene exploration. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for a model of visual object recognition in the context of real-world scenes.
Peter De Graef, Pierre Jolicoeur, Géry D'Ydewalle
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 317-318; https://doi.org/10.1037/h0084368

G Benoît, L Fortin, S Lemelin, L Laplante, J Thomas, J Everett
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46

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R Demerval
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 53-64

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S Normandeau
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 117-37

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Karl Verfaillie
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 215-235; https://doi.org/10.1037/h0084322

Abstract:
In order to recognize an object, the visual system must make abstraction of proximal stimulus variations concomitant with the incidental vantage point. Theoretical models can be distinguished according to the degree to which they require the achievement of viewpoint independence prior to matching a stored object model. Recognition-by-components is one theory which incorporates the realization of general viewpoint invariance as one of its hallmarks. Some aspects of this theory, especially the orientation independence of the represented relations between object parts, are scrutinized. Next, an alternative approach is sketched in which object recognition is accomplished on the basis of a stimulus description which is dependent on the object's orientation, but which makes abstraction of other stimulus variations. Relevant neurophysiological findings are discussed, as well as behavioural evidence from experiments investigating orientation-dependent priming effects in the perception of biological motion.
Gordon Winocur
Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie, Volume 46, pp 509-509; https://doi.org/10.1037/h0084369

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