Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology

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ISSN / EISSN : 0023-852X / 1531-4995
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1002)
Total articles ≅ 36,174
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, Maxene Meier, Kaitlyn Tholen Bs, Renee Crowder, Regina Hoefner‐Notz, Thanh Nguyen, Sarah Derieg, Kristen Campbell Ms, Lisa McLeod
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29909

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Chaewon Hwang, ,
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lio2.668

Abstract:
Objective Increasing evidence suggests overlap in mechanisms of obstructive and central sleep apnea. Our objective was to compare the patient characteristics and polysomnographic findings of children with concurrent obstructive and central sleep apnea (obstructive sleep apnea + central sleep apnea [OSA + CSA]), to those with OSA only. Methods A retrospective case series of polysomnogram (PSG) from 30 June 2013 to 30 June 2018 of patients 18 years and younger was performed. PSG parameters were analyzed per standard protocol. There were two groups, OSA only group and OSA + CSA group. OSA + CSA was subdivided into groups of central apnea index (CAI) ≤5, and CAI >5. Differences in the age, sex, body mass index (BMI) percentile, prevalence of medical conditions, and PSG parameters between OSA only and OSA + CSA were assessed for statistical significance. Results The mean age of the OSA only group was 8.2 years, significantly higher than that of the OSA + CSA group, 5.0 years, P < .00001. The proportion of underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese patients according to BMI percentiles was not statistically significantly different between the two groups, P > .05. Most common comorbidity in the two groups was pulmonary conditions, which included asthma. Of the PSG parameters, arousals due to respiratory events and obstructive apnea hypopnea index of all OSA + CSA groups were significantly higher than those of the OSA only group, P < .05. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was significantly higher in total OSA + CSA group and OSA + CSA subgroup with CAI ≤5, P < .05, compared to OSA only. Conclusion Children with concurrent OSA + CSA are younger, but there appears to be no difference in BMI percentiles between OSA only and OSA + CSA. Compared to OSA only group, children with concurrent OSA + CSA have significantly different sleep architecture—higher REM %—and experience significantly higher respiratory arousals and obstructive events, especially in the subgroup with CAI >5. There appears to be overlap in mechanisms of CSA and OSA in this cohort. Level of Evidence 4.
, Chang Ho Lee, Dae Myoung Yoo Ms, Chanyang Min,
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29917

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Rabia Şemsi, Ayşe İriz, Aylin Sepici Dinçel
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lio2.683

Abstract:
Objectives This study aimed to compare serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurofilament light (NfL) chain in normal individuals and patients with mild and moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods We enrolled 81 subjects referred to Otorhinolaryngology (Ear-Nose-Throat), Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, between 2017 and 2019. Based on the severity of OSAS, patients were divided into three groups: group 1 with mild OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] 5-15; n = 26), group 2 with moderate-severe OSAS (AHI > 15; n = 32), and group 3 with normal individuals (AHI scores < 5; n = 23). Results Serum NfL and BDNF levels were evaluated together with the clinical data for all subjects. Significant differences were seen in the oxygen desaturation index (ODI), apnea index, hypopnea index, sleep efficiency, and NfL levels (P < .05) between the three groups. In the moderate-severe group, NfL levels showed a significant positive correlation with apnea index (P < .05, r = .389), hypopnea index (P < .05, r = .455), and ODI (P = .04; r = .362). Conclusions Our findings clarify the pathophysiology of OSAS in cases of repetitive hypoxia and chronic neuronal damage. Based on our results, we recommend that in addition to BDNF, NfL should also be evaluated in different and larger patient cohorts.
, Ku‐Hao Fang, Chun‐Wei Wang, Chun‐Ta Liao, Tzu‐Chen Yen, Taun‐Jen Fang, Shih‐Fan Lai, Hsiang‐Kuang Liang,
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lio2.679

Abstract:
Objective Whether to administer adjuvant treatment is a matter of great debate for oral cavity cancer harboring a single positive node without extranodal extension and positive margin (defined as low/intermediate risk pN1new in this study). Methods A total of 243 low/intermediate risk pN1new patients with oral cavity cancer who received curative surgery were included. Overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared between patients receiving adjuvant treatment and observation alone. Results For patients receiving adjuvant therapy vs observation, the differences in outcomes were not statistically significant in terms of 5-year OS, LRFS, RRFS, and DMFS. For subgroup analysis, in low/intermediate pN1new patients with one or more minor risk factors, adjuvant therapy was not significantly associated with OS, LRFS, RRFS, or DMFS in pN1new patients. Conclusion For low/intermediate risk pN1new patients with oral cavity cancer, adjuvant therapy might be omitted. Level of Evidence 4.
Zahrah M. Taufique, Paul J. Escher Ba, Tyler J. Gathman Bs, Amanda J. Nickel, Daniel B. Lee, ,
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29899

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Stephen F. Bansberg, , Brittany E. Howard, Andy M. Courson, Amar Miglani
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29901

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Wan Nur Anis Wan Draman, , Hazama Mohamad, Siti Asma Hassan, Normastura Abd Rahman
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lio2.682

Abstract:
Objective To determine the current microbiological profile of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), their antimicrobial sensitivity, their resistance pattern to locally available antibiotics and the appropriate antibiotic against isolated microorganisms causing CSOM. Methods This cross-sectional study involved 91 ear swab specimens obtained from patients clinically diagnosed with active CSOM. Swabs were cultured for microbial identification according to a standard protocol. We performed antibiotic susceptibility testing, using the modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, and the diameter of the inhibition zone was interpreted based Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results Microbial growth was seen in 85 (93.4%) samples, but 6 (6.6%) samples had no growth. Among the samples with growth, 63 (69.2%) were monomicrobial, 13 (14.3%) were polymicrobial, and 9 (9.9%) were of mixed growth with more than three microorganisms. The most common bacteria isolated was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32.6%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (16.9%) and Klebsiella spp. (5.6%). The most sensitive antibiotics against P aeruginosa were ceftazidime, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, and cefepime. S aureus showed the highest sensitivity toward rifampin, cefoxitin, and fusidic acid. Conclusions The bacteriological profile of CSOM showed a high prevalence of P aeruginosa, followed by S aureus and Klebsiella spp. with different distributions in different age groups. We observed a declining pattern of their antibiotic sensitivity. It is important to be aware of the current trend of the bacteriological profiles and to revise the antibiotic regime according to both the sensitivity and age groups. Level of Evidence: NA.
Kavya Pai, Carla Baaklini Bs, Claudia I. Cabrera, , Nicole Fowler, Nicole Maronian
Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology; https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29905

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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