Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2572-7923 / 2572-7931
Published by: EnPress Publisher (10.24294)
Total articles ≅ 99
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John Thompson Okpa, Bassey Ballantyne Ikpeme, Nwosu Uchechukwu Wilson, Ude Bassey Obeten, Ngozi Christiana Nwadike
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i2.1448

Abstract:
The study examined the socio-demographic factors affecting access to and utilization of social welfare services in Yenagoa Local Government Area of Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were adopted to select 570 respondents from the study area. Probability and non-probability sampling techniques were adopted in the selection of communities, and respondents. The quantitative data were analyzed using frequency distribution tables and percentages, while chi-square statistic was used to determine the relationship between socio-demographic variables and access to and utilization of social welfare services. The qualitative data were analyzed in themes as a complement to the quantitative data. This study reveals that although all the respondents reported knowing available social welfare services, 44.3% reported not having access to existing social services due to factors connected to serendipity variables, such as terrain condition, ethnicity and knowing someone in government. Therefore, the study recommends that the government and other stakeholders should push for the massive delivery of much-needed social welfare services to address the issue of welfare service deficit across the nation, irrespective of the ethnic group and whether the community is connected to the government of the day or not, primarily in rural areas.
Raffaello Furlan, Michael Grosvald, Aamna Azad
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i2.1496

Abstract:
In the past decade, the capital city of Doha of the State of Qatar has experienced rapid urban expansion and other changes due to globalization, which has caused (i) the loss of a compact urban pattern, (ii) landscape fragmentation, and (iii) deficiency of green spaces. Therefore, as envisioned by Qatar National Vision 2030 (QNV-2030), the State of Qatar plans to invest substantial funds into the urban regeneration of the built environment, along with the development of large areas of public parks as a means of promoting more sustainable urban development and enhancing city residents’ well-being. Accessibility contributes to the usability of public facilities on the part of the neighborhood community, thus enhancing city dwellers’ well-being. Nonetheless, the authors argue, the urban network along Doha’s Corniche promenade, the dominant open public space and the spine of the city, lacks connectivity at various scales of space. Therefore, this research study aimed to assess the existing conditions of Doha’s Corniche and recommend strategies for implementing its integration into the newly emerging city’s urban fabric. The findings, revealed through a network-analysis investigation based on graph theory, allowed us to generate a framework for shaping open public spaces, promoting higher living standards through a green network system planned at the city scale. The proposed framework addresses social-ecological challenges of distinctive open public spaces and helps define an approach for (i) tailoring the accessibility of open public spaces to their surroundings, and (ii) enhancing city dwellers’ well-being.
Bunmi Isaiah Omodan, Samuel O. Abejide
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i2.1483

Abstract:
This article focuses on Maslow’s theory of hierarchy of needs, which has been criticized for lacking scientific evidence towards an effective municipal infrastructure management system. To ameliorate this, we contend that 21st-century management is not limited to the cardinal direction of motivation from the bottom hierarchy to the top hierarchy, as indicated by Maslow. We also argue that Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory did not take cognizance of innovations and situational advancements embedded in societal dynamism. Our argument is located within the principles of the interpretive paradigm. This paradigm enables us to analyze the deficiencies inherent in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs within the 21st-century needs assessment perspective and re-establish the necessity for the novel motivation needs theory to cater for the changing world. In doing this, we engaged conceptual analysis as a method of analyzing or making sense of perceived complex concepts towards meaning-making. We conclude that an inclusive infrastructure needs assessment must be geared towards a reformed approach of people’s satisfaction, which informs the necessity to reconstruct Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory. The needs satisfaction of the populace or community should be of prime importance, in addition to ensuring that people’s satisfaction is met towards enhancing and promoting socio-economic growth and development.
, Niguisse Solomon
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i2.1466

Abstract:
Inequity in infrastructure distribution and social injustice’s effects on Ethiopia’s efforts to build a democratic society are examined in this essay. By ensuring fair access to infrastructure, justice, and economic opportunity, those who strive for social justice aim to redistribute resources in order to increase the well-being of individuals, communities, and the nine regional states. The effects that social inequity and injustice of access to infrastructure have on Ethiopia’s efforts to develop a democratic society were the focus of the study. Time series analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) and composite infrastructure index (CII), as well as structural equation modeling–partial least squares (SEM-PLS), were necessary to investigate this issue scientifically. This study also used in-depth interviews and focus group discussions to support the quantitative approach. The research study finds that public infrastructure investments have failed or have been disrupted, negatively impacting state- and nation-building processes of Ethiopia. The findings of this research also offer theories of coordination, equity, and infrastructure equity that would enable equitable infrastructure access as a just and significant component of nation-building processes using democratic federalism. Furthermore, this contributes to both knowledge and methodology. As a result, indigenous state capability is required to assure infrastructure equity and social justice, as well as to implement the state-nation nested set of policies that should almost always be a precondition for effective state- and nation-building processes across Ethiopia’s regional states.
Dikshya Thapa, Muhammad Noor Farid, Christophe Prevost
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1380

Abstract:
This paper contributes to a long-standing debate in development practice: under what conditions can externally established participatory groups engage in the collective management of services beyond the life of a project? Using 10 years of panel data on water point functionality from Indonesia’s rural water program, the Program for Community-Based Water Supply and Sanitation, the paper explored the determinants of subnational variation in infrastructure sustainability. It then investigated positive and negative deviance cases to answer why some communities successfully engaged in system management despite being located in difficult conditions as per quantitative findings and vice versa. The findings show that differences in the implementation of community participation, driven by local social relations between frontline service providers, that is, village authorities and water user groups, explain sustainable management. This initial condition of state-society relations influences how the project is initiated, kicking off negative or positive reinforcing pathways, leading to community collective action or exit. The paper concludes that the relationships between frontline government representatives and community actors are important and are an underexamined aspect of the ability of external projects to generate successful community-led management of public goods.
Ambaw Desalegn
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1319

Abstract:
The purpose of this article is to determine the equitability of airport and university allocations throughout Ethiopian regional states based on the number of airports and institutions per 1 million people. According to the sample, the majority of respondents believed that university allocation in Ethiopia is equitable. In contrast, the majority of respondents who were asked about airports stated that there is an uneven distribution of airports across Ethiopia’s regional states. Hence, both interviewees and focus group discussants stated that there is a lack of equitable distribution of universities and airports across Ethiopia’s regional states. This paper contributes a lesson on how to create a comprehensive set of determining factors for equitable infrastructure allocation. It also provides a methodological improvement for assessing infrastructure equity and other broader implications across Ethiopian regional states.
Anwesha Mahanta, Parijat Borgohain
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1395

Abstract:
The frenetic pace of urban growth in India has caused major concerns regarding the quality of urban livability. Thus, constructing livable cities has become a major goal for new urbanization in India. But urban livability as a behavioral function of the interaction between urban environment and individual characteristics is still understudied. Therefore, to enhance urban livability and construct people-oriented livable cities, this research study aimed to understand the perception of the residents of Guwahati, India, on urban livability and its determinants. Following the notion of uncertain geographic context problem (UGCoP), the current study developed an appropriate conceptual and methodological framework that evaluated the residents’ satisfaction with urban livability and the effect of its dimensions using statistical methods, which were exploratory factor analysis, structural equation modeling and Spearman’s rank correlation. The empirical results of the study indicate that residents’ mean satisfaction with the city’s livable condition is above dissatisfaction level (2.735) and the four examined dimensions have a positive influence upon residents’ satisfaction with urban livability. Additionally, different socio-economic attributes also exert significant effects on the overall satisfaction with urban livability. Therefore, this study is a practical example and model reference for enhancing urban livability in India, particularly for fast-growing cities.
Mekonnen Kumlachew Yitayaw, Habtamu Legese Feyisa, Wondmagegn Biru Mamo, Yohannes Kefale Mogess
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1421

Abstract:
The ultimate objective of the study was to investigate the effects of being landlocked on the living standards in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries from 1991 to 2019. Adopting the two-step estimation technique of System GMM (generalized method of moments), the study found that being landlocked has a negative and significant effect on the living standards in SSA countries when using GDP per capita as the living standard measure. Moreover, the historical living standard experiences of SSA countries have a positive and significant influence on the current living standard level. In addition, the population growth rate has a positive and significant effect on the living standards in SSA countries. On the other hand, the official exchange rate, broad money as a percentage of GDP, and inflation have a negative and significant effect on the living standards in SSA countries. Generally, the estimated result reveals the existence of a significant variation in the living standards in landlocked and coastal SSA countries. This study suggests that regional integration between landlocked and transit countries should be improved to minimize entry costs and increase access to global markets for landlocked countries. We argue that this study is of interest to landlocked and coastal countries to increase trade integration and promote the development of both groups, and it will contribute to the scarce empirical evidence.
An Zhou
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1397

Abstract:
China’s economic structure has made subtle changes with the development of digital economy. Along with the marginal diminishing effect of Chinese monetary policies and the increase of the overall leverage ratio, the Chinese economic growth mode of relying on real estate, trade and infrastructure construction in the past will not be sustainable in the next decade. This paper makes a theoretical analysis on the reduction of the search cost in digital economy. Also, this paper used empirical methods to study the relationship between China’s economic growth and digital infrastructure construction. In conclusion, the digital economy has reduced the search cost for people, and big data will become a product factor participating in labor distribution. In addition, this paper proposes for the first time that digital economy can effectively restrain inflation. The Chinese government needs to attach importance to the issue that current internet enterprise oligarchs will probably monopolize the usage of big data in the development of digital economy in the future and become the obstacle to effective economic growth. In addition, close attention should be paid to the vulnerabilities of financial and taxation systems for digital economic entities to avoid continuous disguised tax subsidies to internet oligarchs, thus preventing industrial monopoly.
Sonia Phalatse
Journal of Infrastructure, Policy and Development, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24294/jipd.v6i1.1391

Abstract:
This paper assesses South Africa’s massive infrastructure drive to revive growth and increase employment. After years of stagnant growth, this is now facing a deep economic crisis, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This drive also comes after years of weak infrastructure investment, widening the infrastructure deficit. The plan outlines a R1 trillion investment drive, primarily from the private sector through the Infrastructure Fund over the next 10 years (Government of South Africa, 2020). This paper argues that while infrastructure development in South Africa is much-needed, the emphasis on de-risking for private sector buy-in overshadows the key role the state must play in leading on structurally transforming the economy.
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