International Journal of Learning and Development

Journal Information
EISSN : 2164-4063
Current Publisher: Macrothink Institute, Inc. (10.5296)
Total articles ≅ 486
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

Vasiliki Polydorou, Zoe Karanikola, George Panagiotopoulos
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 17-31; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i2.18317

Abstract:
Following the guidelines of the Agenda 2020, the international Organisations and the European Union have laid the foundations of educational policy. Every person’s right to quality education is put forward to every international document, considering education as the means for the prosperity of all the people and the planet. Through qualitative analysis, with the use of thematic networks, three documents: of UNESCO, (2017) “E2030 education and skills for the 21st century”, of the OECD, (2019) “future of Education and skills 2030: OECD learning compass 2030” and of the European Commission, (2018). “Annex of the Recommendation for the establishment of a Council regarding the basic skills of lifelong learning”, the modern skills required of students as well as teachers are explored, since their acquisition is imperative, as well as the manner of this acquisition are being examined. Thus arose the necessity of acquiring digital and social skills, lifelong learning culture, citizenship and ecology learning. Additionally, the necessity of modification of education is put forward. Finally, it is important that educators receive proper education, so that they acquire new knowledge, attitudes, skills to be able to respond to their role as vehicles of change.
Li Sun
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 32-45; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i2.18580

Abstract:
This paper studies the relationship between minority college students’ English learning autonomy, English learning self-efficacy and English learning engagement, based on attribution theory and social cognitive theory. A questionnaire was first conducted on 570 ethnic minority non-English major college students in Yunnan province, Guizhou province, and Sichuan province, China. Then, statistical software is used to make regression analysis on the relationship between variables. Research results show that English learning autonomy has a significant positive impact on English learning engagement; English learning autonomy has a significant positive impact on English learning self-efficacy; English learning self-efficacy has a significant positive impact on English learning engagement; English learning self-efficacy has a partial mediating role in English learning autonomy and English learning engagement. Finally, some strategies are proposed to improve English learning engagement from motivation-driven perspective, involving learning evaluation, learning resources and learning guidance.
Maria Karadimou, Kostis Tsioumis
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 1-16; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i2.18363

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to examine whether there is a correlation between the leader's collaborative networks (teachers, students, and the community) and the civic education provided to students in their school unit. The survey was conducted in July 2020 using a closed questionnaire. The research involved 122 primary school teachers (kindergarten teachers, teachers, and expertise teachers) who were asked to choose from a five-point scale, or from multiple answers. The survey based on the assumption that the existence of a collective and democratic climate of school administration helps to encourage teachers to address issues of education in the capacity of citizen. The results of the survey lead us to confirm our initial thought, which was the springboard for conducting this research, that those teachers who work in an environment characterised with respect and collectivity, it makes sense to be them who embrace the principles of citizenship education and consider it important to convey them on to their students.
Adetunji Adeniyi
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 46-62; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i2.18612

Abstract:
Unemployment is a major macroeconomic malaise in Nigeria. It has been high and rising over the years across dictatorship, democratic, administrative, and economic regimes. In the process sectoral employment transitioned from the productive sectors of agriculture and manufacturing to services sectors of trade and services and administration sectors of the economy. This study examined the patterns of unemployment and the transitioning of sectoral employment during the economic growth period between 1981 and 2014.It concluded that, despite the fact that economic growth was a common factor, unemployment worsened during democracy, and more so under the Yar’Adua / Jonathan administration. Unemployment was best managed under the military, ironically, and better under the Obasanjo administration, respectively.
Adetunji Adeniyi
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 63-93; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i2.18613

Abstract:
The Nigerian economy was characterised with high levels of unemployment during the periods of substantial growth between 1981 and 2014. Various economists described the growth regime as “jobless”. Sectoral differences were, also, observed with regard to their job absorptive capacities. Time series secondary data covering 1981 to 2014 on the rebased Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and sectoral Gross Value Added (GVA) at 2010 constant basic prices, employment, wage rate, inflation rate and interest rate were collected from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) and Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN). The variables were extracted from statutory publications of the institutions, collated and summarised into a table of data. The unit root test was carried out to test for stationarity of variables. The data was analysed using VECM at α 0.05. The result shows that wage rate, inflation rate, and interest rate all affected employment negatively across sectors. Gross Value added affected employment positively in the non-agricultural sectors, but negatively in the agricultural sectors. Inter-sectoral linkages and dependences also peculiarly affected job creation positively or negatively.
Sakina Moraa Mogaka, Chrispus Wawire, Doyne Mugambi
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 1-38; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i1.18273

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Khaled Karim
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 121-130; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i1.18300

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Abdul Aziz Dakhil Al-Anzi
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 89-120; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i1.18379

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Ahmad Alfailakawi
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 62-88; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i1.18378

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Sumas Wongsunopparat, Pranee Jaroensuk
International Journal of Learning and Development, Volume 11, pp 39-61; doi:10.5296/ijld.v11i1.18144

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