Bioinspiration & Biomimetics

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ISSN / EISSN : 1748-3182 / 1748-3190
Published by: IOP Publishing (10.1088)
Total articles ≅ 1,239
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, Viktor Walter, Pavel Petráček, , Martin Saska
Published: 15 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac3060

Abstract:
A novel approach for achieving fast evasion in self-localized swarms of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) threatened by an intruding moving object is presented in this paper. Motivated by natural self-organizing systems, the presented approach of fast and collective evasion enables the UAV swarm to avoid dynamic objects (interferers) that are actively approaching the group. The main objective of the proposed technique is the fast and safe escape of the swarm from an interferer discovered in proximity. This method is inspired by the collective behavior of groups of certain animals, such as schools of fish or flocks of birds. These animals use the limited information of their sensing organs and decentralized control to achieve reliable and effective group motion. The system presented in this paper is intended to execute the safe coordination of UAV swarms with a large number of agents. Similar to natural swarms, this system propagates a fast shock of information about detected interferes throughout the group to achieve dynamic and collective evasion. The proposed system is fully decentralized using only onboard sensors to mutually localize swarm agents and interferers, similar to how animals accomplish this behavior. As a result, the communication structure between swarm agents is not overwhelmed by information about the state (position and velocity) of each individual and it is reliable to communication dropouts. The proposed system and theory were numerically evaluated and verified in real-world experiments.
Xiaobo Bi,
Published: 15 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac3061

Abstract:
An axisymmetric fluid-structure interaction model based on the immersed-boundary approach is developed to study the self-propelled locomotion of a squid-inspired swimmer in relatively low Reynolds numbers (O(1-10^6)). Through cyclic deformation, the swimmer generates intermittent jet flow, which, together with the added-mass effect associated with the body deformation, provides thrust. Through a control volume analysis we are able to determine the jet-related thrust. By adding it to the added-mass-related thrust we separate the net thrust on the body from the drag effect due to forward motion, so that the propulsion efficiency in free swimming is found. This numerical algorithm and thrust-drag decomposition method are used to study the dynamics of the bio-inspired locomotion system in different conditions, whereby the performance is characterized by the aforementioned propulsion efficiency as well as the conventionally defined cost of transport.
, , Kitty Kumar, Martin Bechthold, Donald E. Ingber, Joanna Aizenberg
Published: 13 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2f55

Abstract:
In this work, we report a paradigmatic shift in bioinspired microchannel heat exchanger design towards its integration into thin film wearable devices, thermally active surfaces in buildings, photovoltaic devices, and other thermoregulating devices whose typical cooling fluxes are below 1 kW/m2. The transparent thermoregulation device is fabricated by bonding a thin corrugated elastomeric film to the surface of a substrate to form a microchannel water-circuit with bioinspired unit cell geometry. Inspired by the dynamic scaling of flow systems in nature, empirically derived sizing rules and a novel numerical optimization method implemented in MATLAB® with COMSOL Multiphysics® are used to maximize the thermoregulation performance of the microchannel network by enhancing the uniformity of flow distribution. The optimized network design results in a 25% to 37% increase in the heat flux compared to non-optimized designs. The study demonstrates the versatility of the presented device design and architecture by fabricating and testing a scaled-up numerically optimized heat exchanger design for building-scale and wearable applications.
, Thomas Engels, Henja Wehmann, , Fritz-Olaf Lehmann, Kai Schneider
Published: 13 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2f56

Abstract:
Insect wings can undergo significant deformation during flapping motion owing to inertial, elastic and aerodynamic forces. Changes in shape then alter aerodynamic forces, resulting in a fully coupled Fluid–Structure Interaction (FSI) problem. Here, we present detailed three-dimensional FSI simulations of deformable blowfly (Calliphora vomitoria) wings in flapping flight. A wing model is proposed using a multi-parameter mass-spring approach chosen for its implementation simplicity and computational efficiency. We train the model to reproduce static elasticity measurements by optimizing its parameters using a genetic algorithm with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES). Wing models trained with experimental data are then coupled to a high-performance flow solver run on massively parallel supercomputers. Different features of the modeling approach and the intra-species variability of elastic properties are discussed. We found that individuals with different wing stiffness exhibit similar aerodynamic properties characterized by dimensionless forces and power at the same Reynolds number. We further study the influence of wing flexibility by comparing between the flexible wings and their rigid counterparts. Under equal prescribed kinematic conditions for rigid and flexible wings, wing flexibility improves lift-to-drag ratio as well as lift-to-power ratio and reduces peak force observed during wing rotation.
Luca Ciarella, Katherine E Wilson, A Richter, I A Anderson,
Published: 12 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2786

Sun Wenguang, Wang Gang, Yuan Feiyang, Wang Siqi, Zheng Qiao, Wang Kuang, Fei Pan, Junzhi Yu,
Published: 12 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac220f

Alexander E. Beasley, Mohammed-Salah Abdelouahab, , , Anna Powell, Andrew Adamatzky
Published: 8 October 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2e0c

Abstract:
Memristors close the loop for I-V characteristics of the traditional, passive, semi-conductor devices. A memristor is a physical realisation of the material implication and thus is a universal logical element. Memristors are getting particular interest in the field of bioelectronics. Electrical properties of living substrates are not binary and there is nearly a continuous transitions from being non-memristive to mem-fractive (exhibiting a combination of passive memory) to ideally memristive. In laboratory experiments we show that living oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus exhibit mem-fractive properties. We offer a piece-wise polynomial approximation of the I-V behaviour of the oyster mushrooms. We also report spiking activity, oscillations in conduced current of the oyster mushrooms.
, Dipan Deb, Haithem E Taha
Published: 29 September 2021
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics; https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2b00

Abstract:
In this paper, we perform experimental investigations of the aerodynamic characteristics due to wing clapping in bio-inspired flying robots; i.e., micro-air-vehicles (MAVs) that fly by flapping their wings. For this purpose, four flapping MAV models with different levels of clapping (from no clapping at all to full clapping) are developed. The aerodynamic performance of each model is then tested in terms of the average thrust and power consumption at various flapping frequencies. The results show that clapping enhance both thrust and efficiency. To gain some physical insight into the underlying physics behind this clapping-thrust-enhancement, we perform a smoke flow visualization over the wings of the four models at different instants during the flapping cycle.
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