Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy

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ISSN / EISSN : 1341-321X / 1437-7780
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 3,253
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, Akari Komeya, Yuki Enoki, Kazuaki Taguchi, Shunsuke Uno, Yoshifumi Uwamino, , Junko Kizu, Naoki Hasegawa
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.10.003

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Bill Tak Hing Wong, Stanley Chi Fai Kan, Alex Hak Keung Lo, Lap Yin Ho, , Christopher Lai
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.10.010

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Po-Yu Su, Boon Fatt Tan, Chun-Min Fu, Chi-Nien Chen, An-Kuo Chou, Po-Jung Kung, Ling-Chun Liao,
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.10.002

Abstract:
Imatinib is a crucial therapeutic strategy against chronic myeloid leukemia. Though superficial edema is a common adverse effect of imatinib, massive fluid retention is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of an adolescent who had tolerated imatinib for a long time, and then presented with massive pleural/pericardial effusion during an episode of Campylobacter jejuni bacteremia. A stepwise and comprehensive survey excluded all other plausible causes of disease. The Naranjo scale was used to assess the probability of an adverse effect of medication, and the score turned out to be 9, indicating severe fluid retention to be a definite reaction to imatinib. Drug discontinuation, antibiotic administration, and invasive procedures improved this condition. After this episode, the patient could tolerate imatinib again, illustrating the transient and reversible nature of this reaction. Since prolonged imatinib usage is crucial for chronic myeloid leukemia control, alertness to drug-related adverse effects is recommended, even if the subject has previously shown a good tolerance to the drug due to various physical conditions, especially physiological stressors, like infection or inflammation.
Yoshiki Katada, Shunsaku Nakagawa, Miki Nagao, Yuko Yoshida, Yuya Matsuda, Yuki Yamamoto, Kotaro Itohara, Satoshi Imai, , Takayuki Nakagawa, et al.
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.09.020

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Hisataka Goda, Haruyuki Nakayama-Imaohji, Hitoshi Yamaoka, Ayano Tada, Tamiko Nagao, Tomohiko Fujisawa, ,
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.10.001

Abstract:
Introduction Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of infectious gastroenteritis. Since HuNoV shows resistance to alcohol, chlorine-based sanitizers are applied to decontaminate the virus on environmental surfaces. Chlorous acid water (CA) has been recently approved as a novel chlorine-based disinfectant categorized as a Type 2 OTC medicine in Japan. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the capability of CA to inactivate HuNoV. Methods HuNoV (genogroups GII.2 and GII.4) was exposed to the test disinfectants including CA and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and the residual RNA copy was measured by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) after pretreatment with RNase. In addition, the log10 reduction of HuNoV RNA copy number by CA and NaClO was compared in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), sheep red blood cells (SRBC), polypeptone, meat extract or amino acids to evaluate the stability of these disinfectants under organic-matter-rich conditions. Results In the absence of organic substances, CA with 200 ppm free available chlorine provided >3.0 log10 reduction in the HuNoV RNA copy number within 5 min. Even under high organic matter load (0.3% each of BSA and SRBC or 0.5% polypeptone), 200 ppm CA achieved >3.0 log10 reduction in HuNoV RNA copy number while less than 1.0 log10 reduction was observed with 1,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in the presence of 0.5% polypeptone. CA reacted with only cysteine, histidine and glutathione while NaClO reacted with all of the amino acids tested. Conclusions CA is an effective disinfectant to inactivate HuNoV under organic-matter-rich conditions.
Hidetoshi Nomoto, , Sangnim Lee, Nobuhiro Komiya, , Tamano Matsui, Kouichi Morita, Hitoshi Oshitani, Masayuki Saijo, , et al.
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2021.09.015

Abstract:
Introduction In response to global outbreaks of infectious diseases, the need for support from organizations such as the World Health Organization Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) is increasing. Identifying the obstacles and support needs for applicants could increase GOARN deployments from Japan. Methods This cross-sectional study involved a web-based, self-administered questionnaire survey targeting Japanese participants in the GOARN Tier 1.5 training workshop, held in Tokyo in December 2019. Results All 47 Japanese participants in the workshop responded to the survey. Most responders were male and in their 30s and 40s. Participants specialized in case management (42.6%), infection prevention and control (25.6%), epidemiology and surveillance (19.1%). Only two participants (4.6%) had experienced a GOARN deployment. Their motivations for joining the GOARN training workshop were "Desire to be part of an international emerging infectious disease response team" (44.6%), "Interest in making an international contribution" (19.1%), and "Interest in working for the Japanese government in the field of international infectious diseases" (14.9%). Obstacles to GOARN deployments were "Making time for deployments" (45.7%) and "Lack of required professional skills and knowledge" (40.4%). The support needs for GOARN deployments constituted "Periodic simulation training" (51.1%), "Financial support during deployments" (44.7%), and "Technical support for deployments" (40.4%). Conclusions Our study revealed the obstacles and support needs of Japanese candidates for GOARN deployment. Making time and upskilling for GOARN deployment were the main obstacles. More practical training (like GOARN Tier 2.0) with other supports are needed. The national framework is desirable to realize these supports.
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