Annals of Oncology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 09237534 / 15698041
Current Publisher: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Former Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC (10.1023) , Oxford University Press (OUP) (10.1093)
Total articles ≅ 36,193
Google Scholar h5-index: 122
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Latest articles in this journal

A. Oliver Sartor
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 165-166; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.12.005

Abstract:An alpha-emitter, radium-223 (223Ra), has been shown to prolong survival for patients with symptomatic bone metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The first evidence that 223Ra might prolong survival in this setting was derived from a randomized small placebo-controlled phase II trial using four doses of 223Ra at an intravenous (i.v.) dose every 4 weeks (q4w) of 50 kBq/kg.1x1Nilsson, S., Franzén, L., Parker, C. et al. Bone-targeted radium-223 in symptomatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer: a randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled phase II study. Lancet Oncol. 2007; 8: 587–594Google ScholarSee all References Based on that small trial, a phase III trial was designed (ALSYMPCA) using six doses of 50 kBq/kg 223Ra q4w.2x2Parker, C., Nilsson, S., Heinrich, D. et al. Alpha emitter radium-223 and survival in metastatic prostate cancer. N Engl J Med. 2013; 369: 213–223Google ScholarSee all References Why six doses? The randomized phase II trial had used four doses without undue toxicity. Reasoning that four doses were safe and potentially effective, the ALSYMPCA trial design committee surmised that giving more doses might be just as safe but even more effective. The rationale for six doses was logical but data to support the safety/efficacy for six doses were lacking. Thus, ALSYMPCA was one of the few phase III trials launched with no precedent for the dose and schedule actually implemented.
H. Zhai, D. Moore, M. Jamal-Hanjani
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 169-170; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.12.004

T. André, D. Vernerey, S.A. Im, G. Bodoky, R. Buzzoni, S. Reingold, F. Rivera, J. McKendrick, W. Scheithauer, G. Ravit, et al.
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 246-256; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.12.006

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
L. Ny, L.Y. Rizzo, V. Belgrano, J. Karlsson, H. Jespersen, L. Carstam, R.O. Bagge, L.M. Nilsson, J.A. Nilsson
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 266-273; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.11.002

Abstract:The mouse strains usually used to generate patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are immunocompromised, rendering them unsuitable for immunotherapy studies. Here we assessed the value of immune-PDX mouse models for predicting responses to anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor therapy in patients. Melanoma biopsies contained in a retrospective biobank were transplanted into NOG mice or NOG mice expressing interleukin 2 (hIL2-NOG mice). Tumor growth was monitored, and comparisons were made with clinical data, sequencing data, and current in silico predictive tools. Biopsies grew readily in NOG mice but growth was heterogeneous in hIL2-NOG mice. IL2 appears to activate T-cell immunity in the biopsies to block tumor growth. Biopsy growth in hIL2-NOG mice was negatively associated with survival in patients previously treated with PD-1 checkpoint blockade. In two cases, the prospective clinical decisions of anti-PD-1 therapy or targeted BRAF/MEK inhibitors were supported by the observed responses in mice. Immune-PDX models represent a promising addition to future biomarker discovery studies and for clinical decision making in patients receiving immunotherapy.
A. Guzek, A.S. Berghoff, J. Jasinska, E. Garner-Spitzer, A. Wagner, K. Stiasny, H. Holzmann, M. Kundi, C. Zielinski, U. Wiedermann
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 319-321; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.11.005

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
F. Lordick, K. Herrmann
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 163-164; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.11.008

I. Kalliala, A. Athanasiou, A.A. Veroniki, G. Salanti, O. Efthimiou, N. Raftis, S. Bowden, M. Paraskevaidi, K. Aro, M. Arbyn, et al.
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 213-227; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.11.004

E. Pros, M. Saigi, D. Alameda, G. Gomez-Mariano, B. Martinez-Delgado, J.J. Alburquerque-Bejar, J. Carretero, R. Tonda, A. Esteve-Codina, I. Catala, et al.
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 274-282; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.09.001

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
G. Curigliano, D. Lenihan, M. Fradley, S. Ganatra, A. Barac, A. Blaes, J. Herrmann, C. Porter, A.R. Lyon, P. Lancellotti, et al.
Published: 1 February 2020
Annals of Oncology, Volume 31, pp 171-190; doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.10.023

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.