Journal of Clinical Nursing

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0962-1067 / 1365-2702
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1111)
Total articles ≅ 8,902
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
MEDLINE
PUBMED
SCIE
SSCI
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

Ming Chan, , Cheuk Yiu Charlotte Lee, , Jun Yi Claire Teo, Chuen Wei Alvin Seah, Yanjun Lin,
Published: 20 January 2022
Journal of Clinical Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16212

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 18 January 2022
Journal of Clinical Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16202

Abstract:
Aims/Objectives Examine the affective state (anxiety, depression), life satisfaction, stress and worry, media consumption and perceptions of pursuing a career in nursing amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Background Nursing students worldwide have reported increased stress, fear and anxiety amidst challenges and risks associated with COVID-19. It remains unclear what impact COVID-19 will have on nursing students in the United States (US) as they prepare to enter the workforce. Design Cross-sectional study of undergraduate nursing students at one university in the Northeastern United States. Methods Students (N = 161) completed an online survey (July 2020) about health and life satisfaction, affective state (depression, anxiety), stress and interest in pursuing nursing. Descriptive statistical analysis described sample and quantitative data. Linear regression was used to examine whether media consumption, stress, affective states predicted interest in pursuing a nursing career. Qualitative thematic analysis was applied to the open-ended question, ‘How has COVID-19 influenced your interest in pursuing a nursing career?’. The Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research (SRQR) checklist was used to evaluate methodological quality. Results Mean stress score was 56.6 (range 0–100), 55.6% of respondents felt unsettled about the future, and 68.2% reported feeling overwhelmed. 18.7% of students reported moderate to severe anxiety, 19.8% reported moderate to severe depression and 54.4% reported that COVID-19 influenced their interest in nursing. Six themes emerged from qualitative analysis: no change, reaffirming/confirmatory, importance of nursing, reality check, positive influence and negative influence. Conclusions Universities/colleges and nursing faculty should prioritise universal mental health assessment for nursing students and enhance mental health services to support and monitor this population. Relevance to clinical practice Mental health services to support nursing students are warranted in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Reduction in nursing workforce may have significant impacts on staffing ratios, patient outcomes, nurse burn-out and other aspects of clinical care.
Jing Wang, Ketao Mu, Yanhong Gong, Jianxiong Wu, Zhenyuan Chen, Nan Jiang, Guopeng Zhang, Chuanzhu Lv,
Published: 17 January 2022
Journal of Clinical Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16200

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Susan E. Schutz, , Jane V. Appleton
Published: 17 January 2022
Journal of Clinical Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16220

Abstract:
Aim To synthesise what is known from current international evidence about how parents are supported by significant others when they are faced with making decisions about their child's cancer care. Background Parents are faced with making challenging decisions when their child has cancer and may benefit from support. Whilst previous research has comprehensively explored how healthcare professionals can offer support, little attention has been given to how support may be informally provided from a parent's network of significant others. Method An integrative literature review was undertaken and reported following the ENTREQ framework. Literature was identified from comprehensive database searching across four relevant databases (CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO and British Nursing Database) and hand-searching reference lists of retrieved studies. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were critically appraised and then analysed using the Constant Comparative Analysis method. Results Twenty-six articles were included in the review. Two overarching themes were identified. Theme 1—Dimensions of Decision-Making support—included three sub-themes: informational, emotional and instrumental mechanisms of support. Theme 2—Expectations of Decision-Making support—identified that parents’ expectations of their own role, and the role of their significant others, affected how decision-making was supported. Conclusions Parents may seek and receive support from various significant members of their network, but there is a fine line between supportive and unsupportive behaviours. Relevance to clinical practice Each family's unique personal, social and cultural context strongly impacts on their support needs, and nurses and other healthcare professionals should be mindful of how parents may access support from their significant others. Further in-depth research around this area would contribute important knowledge around parents’ support needs.
Tony Ryan, , Steven Robertson
Published: 17 January 2022
Journal of Clinical Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16203

Abstract:
Objective To synthesise the evidence relating to the contribution nurses make during respiratory infectious disease pandemics. Background Pandemics are known for their abrupt and contagious nature, as well as their impact on individuals and society. Nurses are more likely to work closely with patients experiencing illness and disease during pandemics, and studies on the role of the profession have mainly focused on the challenges, barriers and shortfalls in nursing care provision. The nursing role in service delivery and their contribution in improving patient well-being has received far less attention. Methods In May 2020, three review registers, grey literature and the following databases were searched: Medline via Ovid, Web of Science, CINAHL via EBSCO and Cochrane Library. The specific focus was on qualitative literature that considered the experiences and perceptions of nurses providing care during several respiratory pandemics. Selected papers were appraised using CASP checklist. ENTREQ checklist was used to inform stages associated with the synthesis of selected papers. Results From 5553 retrieved citations, the analysis of 24 eligible papers resulted in three key themes: the implications of working during pandemics on nurses’ personal and family life, nursing contribution in challenging conditions, and working above and beyond. Considering nurses’ role in healthcare system, research on their contribution found to have received little appreciation in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions This review pertains to nurses’ work in global context and highlights the huge contribution made by the profession in the context of respiratory pandemics. It confirms that nurses’ experiences outweighed economic, social and psychological implications of providing care during the pandemic crisis. Acknowledging nurses’ resilience and professional motivations, we also argue that the nurse contribution during pandemics can be enhanced when resources, support and training are provided. Further research on contexts and conditions which mitigate nurses the potential for sustained contribution is needed.
Back to Top Top