Nursing Open

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ISSN / EISSN : 2054-1058 / 2054-1058
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1002)
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Total articles ≅ 850
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, Marta Fernández Batalla, Javier Díaz‐Tendero Rodríguez, Juan Antonio Sarrión Bravo, Blanca Gonzalo de Diego, José María Santamaría García
Published: 6 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.900

Abstract:
Aim Validate a manual of care plans for people hospitalized for coronavirus disease, COVID‐19. Design Validation study with a mixed‐method design. Methods Design and validation of a care plans manual for people hospitalized by COVID‐19. Care plans used standardized languages: NANDA‐I, Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) and Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC). The design included external and internal validation with quantitative and qualitative analysis. Data collection was between March and June 2020. The study methods were compliant with the Good Reporting of a Mixed Methods Study (GRAMMS) checklist. Results The manual integrated 24 NANDA‐I diagnoses, 34 NOC and 47 NIC different criteria. It was validated by experts of Scientific‐Technical Commission, who recommended linking the diagnoses to an assessment. The internal validation validated 17 of 24 diagnoses, 56 of 65 NOC and 86 of the 104 NIC. During the discussion group, 6 new diagnoses proposed were validated and the non‐validated diagnoses were linked to the baseline condition of the person.
Laurence Chandebois, Erika Nogue, Catherine Bouschbacher, Sabine Durand, Florence Masson, Renaud Mesnage, Nicolas Nagot,
Published: 6 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.904

Abstract:
Aim To assess nurses’ ability to observe newborn behaviour after in situ training provided by caregivers with advanced practice certification in the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP). Design Prospective observational study. Methods Twelve nurses viewed 20‐min films showing the behaviour of 10 premature newborns before, during and after the usual caregiving. The behaviour was rated on an observation sheet with 88 items distributed into six systems. The responses were compared to the reference ratings established by two professionals certified for this programme. Results Despite less accurate observations during care and for some components, the nurses generally showed a satisfactory ability to observe newborn behaviour after training by NIDCAP expert professionals. The dissemination of observation skills among caregivers may result in an improved quality of patient care and better communication among professionals in a department of neonatology.
Cecilia Cuzco, , Raquel Marín Pérez, Ana Isabel Núñez Delgado, , M. Antonia Martínez Momblan, Dolors Estrada Reventós, Gemma Martínez Estalella,
Published: 6 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.894

Abstract:
Aim (a) To understand patients’ lived experience at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge and (b) to evaluate the impact of a nursing empowerment intervention (NEI) on patients’ anxiety and depression levels at ICU discharge. Design A mixed‐methods approach will be applied. Methods In the qualitative phase, the hermeneutic phenomenological method will be used. Participants will be patients from three university hospitals who will be selected by purposive sampling. Data will be gathered through in‐depth interviews and analysed using content analysis. The qualitative data obtained will be employed to develop the nursing intervention. Subsequently, a multicenter, parallel‐group, experimental pre‐test/post‐test design with a control group will be used to measure the effectiveness of the nursing empowerment intervention in the quantitative phase by means of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Simple random probabilistic sampling will include 172 patients in this phase.
Ralph C. Villar, , Rejo G. Mathew, Ahmed S. Mohamed, Sathish Munirathinam, Ahmad A. Abujaber, Mahmood M. Al‐Jabry, Mujahed Shraim
Published: 5 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.901

Abstract:
Aim This study aims to explore the lived experiences of frontline nurses providing nursing care for COVID‐19 patients in Qatar. Design Qualitative, Phenomenological. Methods Nurses were recruited from a designated COVID‐19 facility using purposive and snowball sampling. The participants were interviewed face‐to‐face using semi‐structured interview questions from 6 September–10 October 2020. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Result A total of 30 nurses were interviewed; (76.7%) were deployed for >6 months. Three major themes were drawn from the analysis: (a) Challenges of working in a COVID‐19 facility (subthemes: working in a new context and new working environment, worn out by the workload, the struggle of wearing protective gear, fear of COVID‐19, witnessing suffering); (b) Surviving COVID‐19 (subthemes: keeping it safe with extra measures, change in eating habits, teamwork and camaraderie, social support); and (c) Resilience of Nurses (subthemes: a true calling, a sense of purpose).
Margarita García‐Carmona, , , Ángel Gómez Solís, , , María José Moreno‐Díaz,
Published: 5 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.887

Abstract:
Aim Caregivers of cancer patients are at high risk of experiencing impairments in terms of anxiety, depression and quality of life. This study examines the mediation capacity that perceived emotional support can have after diagnosis and six months later between depression and anxiety after diagnosis and quality of life in informal caregivers of cancer patients. Design A sample of 67 informal caregivers of cancer patients was used. This study is longitudinal, ex post facto prospective, with convenience sampling. Methods Participants completed the Medical Outcomes Study 36‐Item Short Form (SF‐36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Berlin Social Support Scale (BSSS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Data were collected between March 2017 and November 2018. Results Spearman's correlation analysis showed that anxiety, depression and perceived emotional support were related to quality of life. The mediation analysis showed that the relationship between depression after diagnosis and quality of life six months later was mediated by perceived emotional support.
, Matthias Sehlbrede, Boris A. Brühmann, Erik Farin‐Glattacker
Published: 5 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.912

Abstract:
Aims To assess inter‐professional collaboration between nurses and physicians in long‐term care facilities and to determine if there are differences between subgroups of nurses. Design A cross‐sectional questionnaire survey was carried out between January 2018 and January 2020. Methods 408 health professionals (345 nurses, 63 physicians) from 37 nursing homes in Baden‐Wuerttemberg (Germany) participated in the survey. For data collection, the “Team‐Scale” and “Work Situation Questionnaire for nurses/physicians” instruments were used. Furthermore, five self‐generated items were employed assessing how ward rounds and documentation are implemented. For the evaluation, descriptive analyses, one‐way variance analyses (ANOVAs) and a multilevel analysis were performed. Results Inter‐professional teamwork was rated positively overall. However, the nursing staff usually gave more critical assessments than the physicians (for example, regarding mutual appreciation). Critical assessments could be used to initiate constructive change processes.
Published: 5 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.892

Abstract:
Aim To investigate the association between the nurses’ perception of the public image (PI) of nursing and the quality of nursing work life (QNWL). Design A descriptive correlational study. Methods 250 nurses of 12 hospitals affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were sampled using a proportionate stratified sampling technique. Porter Nursing Image Scale and Brooks QNWL Scale were used for collecting data. Results There was a significant positive correlation between nurses’ perception of their public image and QNWL (r = .158, p = .012). Nurses’ perception of their PI along with other significant predictors including gender, age, position, work shifts, residency, financial status, level of family support, spouse's education and spouse's job significantly explained 15.2% of the predictability of QNWL (F(10,175) = 3.017, p = .001). Findings imply that enhancement of nurses' psychological status (nurses' perception of the public image of their profession) may improve their functional status (quality of nursing work life).
, Irene Yuen Fung Wong
Published: 5 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.893

Abstract:
Aim Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a prevalent mental disorder among children worldwide. The parents of children with ADHD experience great burden. However, burden and coping styles of these parents are seldom explored. The present study aimed to illustrate the burden and coping strategies of parents of children with Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Design A descriptive qualitative study design was employed. Methods Samples were recruited from a general primary school in Hong Kong using convenience sampling. An information sheet was provided to participants, and written informed consent was obtained. Content analysis was conducted after the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. COREQ reporting guidelines were used. Results Individual, face‐to‐face interviews were conducted, using a semi‐structured interview guide with 12 parents of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Four themes (academic burden, children's social dependence, uncertainty regarding parenting strategies before diagnosis and emotional hardship) and three themes (acting according to situation, employing problemfocused coping methods and acceptance) emerged for burden and coping strategies, respectively. Coping strategies processes were also found. Medical diagnosis was reported to be a critical point for parents to shift their coping strategies. Timely interventions, such as early assessment and diagnosis, are recommended during or after medical diagnosis.
Published: 4 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.873

Abstract:
Aims Increased patient activation levels can improve health outcomes. Hence, this study aims to examine the relationships between sociodemographic variables and domain‐specific health literacies with patient activation. Design A cross‐sectional design. Methods 200 outpatient adults with chronic diseases completed a survey that assessed their domain‐specific health literacy and patient activation levels. Univariate and multivariate analysis of the variables were conducted on patient activation with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Multiple linear regression analyses observed a positive linear relationship between the following domain‐specific health literacy variables—“actively manage my health” (p < .0001, 95% CI: 0.89–2.29), “understanding health information” (p = .008, 95% CI: 0.28–1.85), and “finding good health information” (p = .02, 95% CI 0.13–1.51) with patient activation. The other sociodemographic and clinical variables were not statistically significant. Increased focus from healthcare professionals is needed on helping patients better find and understand health information and encouraging them to actively manage their health; elements which would raise their activation levels.
Masoud Khodaveisi, Khodayar Oshvandi, Saeid Bashirian, Salman Khazaei, Mark Gillespie, Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi,
Published: 4 May 2021
by Wiley
Nursing Open; doi:10.1002/nop2.903

Abstract:
Aim Evaluation the moral courage, moral sensitivity and safe nursing care in nurses caring of infected patients by the COVID‐19. Design This study employed cross‐sectional research. Methods 520 nurses caring for COVID‐19 patients in 5 hospitals were selected via convenience sampling. They completed questionnaires online. Data were analysed by SPSS software version 22. Results Findings showed that moral courage has a strong and direct correlation with moral sensitivity (p < .001, r = 0–.70) and safe nursing care (p < .001, r = 0–.74). Variables of moral sensitivity, safe nursing care, work experience, age and employment status can predict 64.76% of the variance in moral courage in these nurses. Nursing care of patients with COVID‐19 have reported high moral courage in recent months, and in spite of the numerous tensions and stresses in terms of caring these patients during this relative long period, they are still diligent in providing safe and high sensitive care to these patients.
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