British Journal of Cancer

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ISSN / EISSN : 0007-0920 / 1532-1827
Published by: Springer Nature (10.1038)
Total articles ≅ 25,689
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Yuma Wada, Mitsuo Shimada, Yuji Morine, Tetsuya Ikemoto, Yu Saito, , Masaki Mori,
Published: 25 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01710-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Susanne Singer, Leopold Hentschel, Stephan Richter, Peter Hohenberger, Bernd Kasper, , Daniel Pink, Jens Jakob, Robert Grützmann, et al.
Published: 20 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01702-z

Abstract:
Background: Sarcomas are rare cancers of high heterogeneity. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) has been shown to be a prognostic factor for survival in other cancer entities but it is unclear whether this applies to sarcoma patients. Patients and methods: HRQoL was prospectively assessed in adult sarcoma patients from 2017 to 2020 in 39 German recruiting sites using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Vital status was ascertained over the course of 1 year. HRQoL domains were analysed by multivariable cox-regressions including clinical and socio-economic risk factors. Results: Of 1102 patients, 126 (11.4%) died during follow-up. The hazard ratio (HR) for global health was 0.73 per 10-point increase (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64–0.85). HR for the HRQoL-summary score was 0.74 (CI 0.64–0.85) and for physical functioning 0.82 (CI 0.74–0.89). There was also evidence that fatigue (HR 1.17, CI 1.10–1.25), appetite loss (HR 1.15, CI 1.09–1.21) and pain (HR 1.14, CI 1.08–1.20) are prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Our study adds sarcoma-specific evidence to the existing data about cancer survival in general. Clinicians and care-givers should be aware of the relations between HRQoL and survival probability and include HRQoL in routine assessment.
, Tor Åge Myklebust, , Bjørn Møller, Melina Arnold, Isabelle Soerjomataram, Freddie Bray, D. Maxwell Parkin, Paul C. Lambert
Published: 20 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01701-0

Abstract:
Background: Comparisons of population-based cancer survival between countries are important to benchmark the overall effectiveness of cancer management. The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) Survmark-2 study aims to compare survival in seven high-income countries across eight cancer sites and explore reasons for the observed differences. A critical aspect in ensuring comparability in the reported survival estimates are similarities in practice across cancer registries. While ICBP Survmark-2 has shown these differences are unlikely to explain the observed differences in cancer-specific survival between countries, it is important to keep in mind potential biases linked to registry practice and understand their likely impact. Methods: Based on experiences gained within ICBP Survmark-2, we have developed a set of recommendations that seek to optimally harmonise cancer registry datasets to improve future benchmarking exercises. Results: Our recommendations stem from considering the impact on cancer survival estimates in five key areas: (1) the completeness of the registry and the availability of registration sources; (2) the inclusion of death certification as a source of identifying cases; (3) the specification of the date of incidence; (4) the approach to handling multiple primary tumours and (5) the quality of linkage of cases to the deaths register. Conclusion: These recommendations seek to improve comparability whilst maintaining the opportunity to understand and act upon international variations in outcomes among cancer patients.
, Lars Pedersen, Rune Erichsen, Timothy L. Lash, Henrik T. Sørensen, Ellen M. Mikkelsen
Published: 20 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01709-6

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Amy K. Kim, James P. Hamilton, Selena Y. Lin, Ting-Tsung Chang, Hie-Won Hann, Chi-Tan Hu, Yue Lou, Yih-Jyh Lin, Terence P. Gade, Grace Park, et al.
Published: 19 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01706-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kyrillus S. Shohdy, Dario M. Villamar, Yen Cao, Janson Trieu, Kristin S. Price, Rebecca Nagy, , Ana M. Molina, Cora N. Sternberg, David M. Nanus, et al.
Published: 19 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-021-01648-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Lauri Jouhi, Timo Atula, Caj Haglund, , Jaana Hagström, Ilmo Leivo
Published: 18 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01708-7

Abstract:
Background: The evaluation of immune response can aid in prediction of cancer behaviour. Here, we assessed the prognostic significance of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods: A total of 182 patients treated for OPSCC were included in this study. Assessment of TILs was conducted on tumour sections stained with standard haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. We used the scoring criteria proposed by the International Immuno-Oncology Biomarker Working Group. Results: The multivariable analysis showed that TILs associated with disease-specific survival with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.13 (95% CI 1.14–3.96; P = 0.017). Similarly, TILs associated significantly with overall survival with HR of 1.87 (95% CI 1.11–3.13; P = 0.018). In a sub-analysis of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases separately, TILs showed a significant prognostic value in both groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: The evaluation of TILs as proposed by the International Immuno-Oncology Biomarker Working Group is a simple and promising method in prediction of survival of OPSCC. It is easily applicable and after further validation can be implemented in the routine pathological report as a basic immune parameter.
, , Minn E Ng, , Simon James Alexander Buczacki
Published: 18 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01700-1

Abstract:
Background: The mechanism underlying improved survival in non-metastatic colon cancer with higher lymph node (LN) yield is unknown. This study aimed to identify whether molecular features in the primary tumour were predictive of LN yield. Methods: Clinical, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and methylation data of non-metastatic, colon cancers studied in The Cancer Genome Atlas were interrogated for associations with LN yield. Based on maximal survival effects, patients were segregated into high (>15) and low (≤15) LN yield. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed on transcriptomic changes to identify biological processes associated with LN yield. Correlations were validated in an independent set of Stage II colon cancers. Results: High LN yield was found predictive of overall and disease-free survival. There was no association of higher LN yield and increasing nodal positivity. High LN yield was strongly linked with gene expression changes associated with the adaptive and dendritic cell immune response. This association was most prominent in node-negative cancers. Analogous findings were reproduced in the validation dataset. Conclusion: The study shows a strong association of an activated immune response in tumours with a high LN yield. Immunogenic tumours have a better prognosis, likely explaining the survival benefit with higher LN yields.
Shuang Ye, Qin Li, Yutuan Wu, Wei Jiang, Shuling Zhou, Xiaoyan Zhou, Wentao Yang, Xiaoyu Tu, , , et al.
Published: 18 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-022-01705-w

Abstract:
Background: We performed an integrative genomic and transcriptomic profiling to identify molecular subtypes and prognostic markers with special focus on immune-related pathways. Methods: Totally, 50 Chinese patients were subjected to targeted next-generation sequencing and transcriptomic sequencing. Results: Two distinct subgroups were identified as immune (22.0%) and non-immune (78.0%) based on the immune-pathway related hierarchical clustering. Surprisingly, patients with immune subtype had a significantly worse survival. The prognostic capacity was validated in external cohorts. The immune group had higher expression of genes involved in pro-inflammation and checkpoints. PD-1 signalling pathway was enriched in the immune subtype. Besides, the immune cluster presented enriched expression of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis and PI3K-AKT-mTOR signalling, while the non-immune subtype had higher expression of metabolic pathways. The immune subtype had a higher mutation rate of PIK3CA though significance was not achieved. Lastly, we established a prognostic immune signature for overall survival. Interestingly, the immune signature could also be applied to renal clear cell carcinoma, but not to other histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Conclusions: An immune subtype of OCCC was identified with poor survival and enrichment of PD-1 and PI3K-AKT-mTOR signalling. We constructed and validated a robust prognostic immune signature of OCCC patients.
, Elnaz Naderi, , Leila Dorling, Craig Luccarini, Alison M. Dunning, Gill Barnett, Miguel Elías Aguado Barrera, Neil G. Burnet, Laura M. Calvo, et al.
Published: 17 January 2022
British Journal of Cancer pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-021-01670-w

Abstract:
Purpose: A two-stage genome-wide association study was carried out in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients aiming to identify genetic variants associated with either specific radiotherapy-induced (RT) toxicity endpoints or a general proneness to develop toxicity after RT. Materials and methods: The analysis included 1780 HNC patients treated with primary RT for laryngeal or oro/hypopharyngeal cancers. In a non-hypothesis-driven explorative discovery study, associations were tested in 1183 patients treated within The Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group. Significant associations were later tested in an independent Dutch cohort of 597 HNC patients and if replicated, summary data obtained from discovery and replication studies were meta-analysed. Further validation of significantly replicated findings was pursued in an Asian cohort of 235 HNC patients with nasopharynx as the primary tumour site. Results: We found and replicated a significant association between a locus on chromosome 5 and mucositis with a pooled OR for rs1131769*C in meta-analysis = 1.95 (95% CI 1.48–2.41; ppooled = 4.34 × 10−16). Conclusion: This first exploratory GWAS in European cohorts of HNC patients identified and replicated a risk locus for mucositis. A larger Meta-GWAS to identify further risk variants for RT-induced toxicity in HNC patients is warranted.
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