Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0966-0879 / 1468-5973
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1111)
Total articles ≅ 972
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SCOPUS
GEOBASE
SSCI
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SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

, Ivar S. Holand, Peter Mozelius, Olof Stjernström
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12389

Abstract:
Emergencies sometimes cross the borders of nations making information sharing over national borders essential in emergency management. This type of information sharing is often mediated by some kind of technology. However, appropriate and efficient cross-border communication is more than providing technology to mediate information exchange. This study note focuses on emergency services experience of terrestrial trunked radio (TETRA)-mediated cross-border communication across the Norwegian–Swedish border. We applied the theory of dialect continua to analyse how people from different dialect areas understood each other. The study was based upon data gathered from semi-structured interviews. The findings show that indeed the technological solutions had opened up new opportunities for cross-border communication but that during stressful conditions, the language differences between Norwegian and Swedish could lead to misunderstandings.
Michael Humann, , Kaye Bright, Janne Thomsen, Phil Crook
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12388

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Sofia Persson
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12387

Abstract:
Private companies often actively engage in disaster response. In recent years, disaster resilience, including public–private partnerships, has been identified as an ideational cornerstone of crisis management policy. This study offers insights into how these international policy trends in disaster management manifest in practice. Based on an empirical study of a large wildfire in the Swedish province of Västmanland in 2014, we investigate how market opportunities and principles influenced the rescue efforts and cooperation between public disaster responders and private actors. The findings illustrate the flip side of public–private disaster cooperation, in relation to three perils: (1) uncertain costs of private disaster support owing to the ambivalent roles of private actors as either disaster entrepreneurs or volunteers; (2) a dangerous work environment for private actors involved in public disaster response and (3) e-volunteers' provision of business donation details around the public response by naming and shaming ‘ungenerous’ private companies.
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12386

Abstract:
The resilience of critical infrastructures in cities is key to being prepared for future crises. The challenge of enhancing critical infrastructure resilience addresses a multitude of actors. However, we lack conceptual, as well as empirical, understanding of how these different actors are coordinated. Therefore, this contribution asks how the different actors involved in critical infrastructure governance are coordinated at the local level. With the help of a typology of network governance coordination (political leadership, mutual exchange, and positive coordination), we look at the critical infrastructure crisis management in major German cities based on survey data with the scenario of a long-lasting, supraregional power outage. The results show that political leadership coordination, as a unilateral and information-based way of addressing public and private actors, is the dominant type. Only a quarter of the cities have chosen measures of mutual exchange coordination based on the consultation in an ad hoc manner. Measures of positive coordination where institutionalized joint planning is central are taken up only by a minority of German cities. Assuming that positive coordination is particularly important in dealing with unexpected events, positive coordination emerges as the missing piece of the resilience puzzle for many German cities.
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, Volume 29, pp 341-341; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12384

Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12382

Abstract:
On Monday morning March 18, 2019 a terrorist opened fire inside a tram in the middle of the city of Utrecht. A key challenge in the Utrecht attack was making sense of the situation and organizing a coherent response in a distributed command and control structure. This is a recurrent challenge in crisis management. As command structures expand, sensemaking becomes distributed when groups at different locations develop partial images of a complex environment. While most sensemaking studies focus on how specific groups attempt to collectively construct a plausible representation of the situation, few accounts of distributed sensemaking have appeared. This study explains how crisis managers made sense of the volatile situation across different command structures. Twenty-five crisis managers from different teams were interviewed by making use of the critical decision methodology. The analysis points to five factors that influence the quality of distributed sensemaking: type of interdependence, sensitivity to operations, plausibility, hierarchy, and identity. It signals that updating one's sensemaking does not only require noticing discrepant cues but is especially related to key social-cognitive and organisational processes that stimulate doubt, questioning, and a plurality of perspectives.
Sally Carlton, , Jennifer H. K. Wong
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management; https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12381

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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