World Journal of English Language

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1925-0703 / 1925-0711
Published by: Sciedu Press (10.5430)
Total articles ≅ 384
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Latest articles in this journal

Suliman Mohammed Alnasser, Mohammad Almoaily
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p66

Abstract:
Both English and Arabic are used in Saudi higher education institutions. Research on English language policies (ELPs) in the Saudi context is limited, highlighting the need for further examination of their implementation and nature. This study investigates the need to introduce a top-down ELP in the Saudi higher education context and the best way to apply this policy from the perspectives of instructors and administrators. A mixed-method approach to data collection was employed: official documentation was analyzed and an online survey, with an open-ended section for faculty members affiliated with Saudi higher education English departments across the country (n=210), was employed. Thereafter, semi-structured interviews were conducted with chairpersons and vice-chairs of university English departments (n=8). The findings suggest that although the majority of English departments recognize the importance of using ELPs, they have either not introduced them or have practiced them implicitly, with a high degree of flexibility that has led to these policies playing a marginal role in academia. The study concludes by encouraging policymakers to design a unified framework for ELPs with the involvement of representatives from university English departments. Other implications are also discussed.
Dalal S. Almubayei, Hanan Taqi
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p11

Abstract:
This paper explored whether accent as a single facet of a speaker’s identity is the determining rationale behind evaluating someone’s personal and national identity. Two auditory clips were recorded by a single speaker: one in General American and one in Kuwaiti accented English. It was distributed alongside a survey to both male and female English major students in two governmental colleges in Kuwait. The survey implemented Osgood’s semantic differential scale and Lambert’s matched guise and results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results revealed the significant superiority of inner circle English varieties over outer circle varieties with a twist, where many students had favorable attitudes towards the local accented English expressing some national pride.
Abdullah N. Alqahtani,
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p160

Abstract:
This paper focuses on the new policy of introducing English alongside Arabic from grade one in Saudi primary schools. This qualitative descriptive study aims to understand the parents' attitudes and teachers' perspectives towards implementing English in grade one. The present study used two methods to collect data: A questionnaire to gather the data from parents, and semi-interviews to collect data from teachers. The samples of the study were 160 parents and 20 teachers. The results revealed that both parents and teachers have positive attitudes towards the new policy. They assured that English will not have a negative impact on Saudi pupils' performance in Arabic. However, the findings also indicated that designing a suitable curriculum, stimulating environment, and having more lessons per week are essential.
Issam Mostafa Ta'Amneh, Abeer Al-Ghazo
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p275

Abstract:
The paper aims at presenting a critical study of five translations of Poe's poems by the students of Translation Department at Isra University. To conduct the study, the researchers chose five of Poe’s well-known poems and divided the sample of the study into five groups. Thirty students participated in this study. The researchers asked the participants to translate the given poems expressing the difficulties they faced as well as the solutions and the strategies that they followed to overcome these difficulties. The study took place in the first semester of the academic year 2021/2022. The results showed that the presence of odd and old words as well as the difficulty of guessing the intended meanings, were the most difficulties that the students faced. As for the strategies, the analysis showed that using different dictionaries to get the intended meaning and depending on the context to guess the meanings of odd words were the most common strategies that the participants followed in their translation tasks. It is expected from this paper to provide some recommendations for the students who study translation in different universities and the lecturers who teach translation to students at different academic levels on how to deal with such difficulties and the best methods to overcome such problems.
Rovena Vora, Anila Çepani
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p263

Abstract:
This paper focuses on the use of body-part terms in verbal phraseological units in English and Albanian. By using parallel texts from two different languages, we are going to recognize the structural, semantic, and stylistic properties of body-part terms as well as their cultural context. By comparing structures involving body terms in one language and their equivalents in another, we aim at showing the differences between these languages in the conceptual patterns and grammaticalization, which seem to be widely certified for this part of the lexicon. 18 items representing the terms for body parts (head, face, eye, brow, ear, nose, tongue, mouth, lip, neck, tooth, hand, leg, knee, heel, shoulder, finger, back) were checked in both English and Albanian and compared semantically based on a corpus of verbal phraseological units retrieved and later selected from 8 literary works in English and 12 in Albanian and 3 idiomatic dictionaries. In the course of our findings, we discovered important similarities and differences between the two languages in the use of body-part terms. In this study, both quantitative and qualitative criteria were taken into account and some cultural nuances were drawn from the interpretation of data.
Apisak Sukying, Worakrit Nontasee
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p306

Abstract:
The present study explored vocabulary knowledge as a multi-aspect construct by examining the acquisition order of different vocabulary aspects and the relationships between these aspects. A battery test of receptive and productive vocabulary aspects, based on Nation’s (2013) framework, was administered to 156 Thai EFL learners in tenth (n = 84) and twelfth (n = 72) grades. Two different grades of Thai EFL learners were used to better describe the vocabulary acquisition process. The results indicated that scores on the tests assessing receptive knowledge of an aspect were higher than scores on the productive knowledge tests, for both grades. However, overall, the twelfth-grade learners performed better than the tenth-grade learners. The findings also revealed significant correlations between knowledge of the different aspects. Furthermore, the Implicational Scaling (IS) analysis revealed that the two grades had distinct implicational patterns of vocabulary aspects. These results provide empirical evidence for the vocabulary acquisition pattern. The results also suggest that vocabulary knowledge is an incremental learning process and that exposure to vocabulary knowledge has positive effects on vocabulary acquisition.
Zahraa Muharam Salman, Ali Hussein Hazem, Dina Fahmi Kamil, Muhammad Hamza Kanaan
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p298

Abstract:
During the fight against Covid-19, schools and universities in Iraq and many other countries have been closed and digital learning has begun to take place. In this paper, the researchers have tried to identify the difficulties which faced students through Electronic Learning (hereafter, E-learning) during Covid-19. Inadequate instruction, lack of internet and electricity, little experience and low attendance are just some of the problems that our student face in this type of learning. To assess the benefit of such learning in Iraq, it is hypothesized in this paper that online learning has a bad impact on students’ performance be it spoken or written. To test the validity of the hypothesis, an online questionnaire of (3) items was given to (30) 4th year students of English department to identify the problems and solutions to digital learning from their own perspective. Data was analyzed by using a mixed method (i:e both quantitative and qualtitative) because such method describes and interpretes statistical percentages. The results of the analysis show that the biggest problem for most of the students in particular in our country is that electricity and internet are not available all the time. Another conclusion is that some students personally are not interested in the subject of grammar. It has also been found that the best solution is to go back to classroom teaching or face to face communucation. The study provides some recommendations which can be of benefit to EFL teachers, students and probably to the teaching process in cases of emergency.
Shaswar Kamal Mahmud, Hanife Bensen Bostanci
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p410

Abstract:
The current study addresses the existing gap between English language programme of the secondary stage classes, and the English language testing method of the Ministry of Education in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), which is used to assess students’ outcomes in English language in the school leaving exams (known as Baccalaureate Exams).The study aims at exploring EFL teachers’ views about English language testing method acquired in the Baccalaureate exams in developing students’ communicative skills. It also aims at revealing their opinions regarding the introduction of a more communicative format for testing students’ outcomes in English in the Baccalaureate Exams of Grade 12. The data for the current study was collected through a questionnaire with a sample of 60 EFL teachers who teach English at Grade 12 in different secondary schools in the KRI. The main findings of the study showed that, the English language test, in the Baccalaureate exams, does not meet the communicative needs of the students. This study has implications for the Ministry of Education to introduce more communicative tests in assessing students’ levels of English at the end of their secondary education.
Abdulfattah Omar, Bader Deraan Aldawsari
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p419

Abstract:
Arabic is a diglossic language. Two variants of Arabic are widely used. H (the High variant) is Classical Arabic, now referred to as Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). The L (Low) variant is the colloquial dialects (DA), which are mostly spoken. The H variant is used in education, press, and other formal correspondence. The Low version is associated with informal contexts. Interestingly, the two versions are completely different from each other in terms of vocabulary, syntax, and even structure. Given the social and cognitive aspects of the language, children go to primary schools with almost no knowledge of MSA. Despite the prolific literature on the linguistic features of Arabic diglossia, very little has been done on the impact of diglossia on academic and educational achievement. In light of this argument, this paper seeks to investigate the teachers' perceived impact of diglossia on the language development and educational achievement of primary school students from a linguistic and anthropological perspective. Interviews were conducted with selected primary school teachers from the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia to elicit their opinions and perception on how diglossia should be tackled when students arrive in a classroom. The data collection tool was an interview comprising close and open-ended questions. The interview questions explored three areas: teachers’ perception of diglossia; perceived challenges that students faced with teaching and study material; and how teachers addressed these challenges. Findings indicate that diglossia poses serious sociolinguistic challenges to most young learners in Saudi schools. Both teachers and learners face difficulties in using only MSA in classrooms as the formal and official medium of instruction in Saudi schools. It is recommended thus the colloquial and vernacular dialects (L varieties) of Arabic should be integrated into the instruction mode to reflect the linguistic reality of the Arab countries.
Abderrazak Zaafour,
World Journal of English Language, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v12n5p425

Abstract:
Cooperative Project-Based Learning (CPBL) is a task-based approach to teaching and learning that enhances students’ motivation to learn cooperatively in groups, investigate and respond to engaging tasks to produce a final product when learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL). However, motivating teachers to implement CPBL in their classrooms is challenging. The present study explored challenges and difficulties teachers of English encounter in their attempt to implement CPBL and provided practical solutions to enhance teachers’ motivation to adopt it. The participating teachers’ perceptions regarding the influence of CPBL on students’ English learning were also considered. Significantly, this study applied quantitative and qualitative techniques, which provide the means to determine whether there are connections among the study’s variables and, if so, how each one may influence the other. As part of the research process, and to identify the perceptions, attitudes, and opinions of 84 educators, survey instruments were distributed, structured interviews were conducted, and classrooms were observed. The results of the study revealed that only 26% of teachers used this methodology. However, 68% demonstrated positive attitudes towards CPBL as a powerful constructional approach. Considerably, the findings indicate some important implications for course designers and teachers of English.
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