Journal of the American College of Surgeons

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1072-7515 / 1879-1190
Current Publisher: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 19,654
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Latest articles in this journal

Christopher J. Coroneos, Yu-Li Lin, Chris Sidey-Gibbons, Malke Asaad, Brian Chin, Stefanos Boukovalas, Margaret S. Roubaud, Makesha Miggins, Donald P. Baumann,
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 253-263; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.10.023

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Katrin Schwameis, , Ping Zheng, Andrew D. Grubic, Madison Salvitti, Toshitaka Hoppo, Blair A. Jobe
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 288-297; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.11.012

Abstract:
Background The performance and durability of various types of fundoplication are variable when stratified by disease severity. To date, magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) has not been evaluated in this context. We designed this study to determine the efficacy of MSA in the treatment of severe GERD. Study design Guided by previous studies, a DeMeester score (DMS) ≥ 50 was used as a cutoff point to define severe reflux disease. Subjects were divided into 2 groups using this cutoff, and outcomes of severe cases were compared with those with less severe disease (DMS < 50). Results A total of 334 patients underwent MSA. Patients with severe disease had a higher mean preoperative DMS compared with those with mild to moderate GERD (79.2 [53.2] vs 22.8 [13.7], p < 0.0001). At a mean postoperative follow-up of 13.6 (10.4) months, there was no difference between the mean GERD Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) total scores in patients with severe disease compared with those with less severe GERD (8.8 [10] vs 9.2 [10.8], p = 0.9204). Postoperative mean DMS was not different between groups (17.3[23.0] vs 14.1[33.9], p = 0.71), and there was no difference in the prevalence of esophagitis (p = 0.52). Patients with severe disease were less likely to be free from use of proton pump inhibitors after surgery (85% vs 93.1%, p = 0.041). There were similar rates of postoperative dysphagia (10% vs 14%, p = 0.42) and need for device removal (3% vs 5%, p = 0.7463). Conclusions MSA is an effective treatment in patients with severe GERD and leads to significant clinical improvement across the spectrum of disease severity, with few objective outcomes being superior in patients with mild-to-moderate reflux disease.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 231-240; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.11.033

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Mary Kathryn Roccato, Jason B. Samarasena, Jennifer M. Kolb, David P. Lee, Robert H. Lee, Shaun Daly, Marcelo W. Hinojosa, Brian R. Smith, Ninh T. Nguyen, et al.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 309-318; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.11.021

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Melina R. Kibbe
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.12.012

Anthony Cyr, Yanjun Zhong, Steven E. Reis, Rami A. Namas, Andrew Amoscato, Brian Zuckerbraun, Jason Sperry, Ruben Zamora, Yoram Vodovotz,
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 276-287.e1; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.12.022

Abstract:
Background Trauma is the leading cause of death and disability for individuals under age 55. Many severely injured trauma patients experience complicated clinical courses despite appropriate initial therapy. We sought to identify novel circulating metabolomic signatures associated with clinical outcomes following trauma. Study design Untargeted metabolomics and circulating plasma immune mediator analysis was performed on plasma collected during 3 post-injury time periods ( Results Eighty-six patients were included for analysis. Sphingolipids were enriched significantly (chi-square, p < 10-6) among the top 50 metabolites. Clustering of sphingolipid patterns identified 3 patient subclasses: nonresponders (no time-dependent change in sphingolipids, n = 41), sphingosine/sphinganine-enhanced (n = 24), and glycosphingolipid-enhanced (n = 21). Compared with the sphingolipid-enhanced subclasses, nonresponders had longer mean length of stay, more ventilator days, higher MOD scores, and higher circulating levels of proinflammatory immune mediators IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP1/CCL2, IP10/CXCL10, and MIG/CXCL9 (all p < 0.05), despite similar Injury Severity Scores (p = 0.12). Conclusions Metabolomic analysis identified broad alterations in circulating plasma sphingolipids after blunt trauma. Circulating sphingolipid signatures and their association with both clinical outcomes and circulating inflammatory mediators suggest a possible link between sphingolipid metabolism and the immune response to trauma.
Erratum
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.12.004

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Yurie Sekigami, Sydney Char, Cate Mullen, Kathryn Huber, Yu Cao, Rachel Buchsbaum, Roger Graham, Salvatore Nardello, Dhruv Singhal,
Journal of the American College of Surgeons; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2021.02.013

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kyle A. Perry
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 318-319; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2021.01.001

Elizabeth D. Krebs, Adishesh K. Narahari, J Hunter Mehaffey, Shayna L. Showalter
Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Volume 232, pp 339-340; doi:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.12.011

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