SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2581-2904 / 2581-2912
Total articles ≅ 113
Current Coverage
DOAJ
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

David Umoru, Janet A Onimawo
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 139-160; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.139-160

Abstract:
This paper attempted to estimate optimal size of public sector that prompts positive output growth in Nigeria based on Monte Carlo simulation of estimated parameters of an error correction model having controlled for regime effect. Our motivation derives from economic theory that absence of government could be injurious to output growth culminating in unavailability of contracts and public goods. Using different policy scenarios of public sector share in GDP, the study validates and supports the tenets of Rahn Curve that economy shrinks when government grows enormous as we found 40% public sector spending as proportion of GDP as optimal public sector size that stimulates positive growth rate of about 0.095% having controlled for regime effect. By implication, our original contribution in this study is amplified on our empirics that public sector role in Nigerian economy is less than or equal to 40%. Consequently, any size of public sector beyond forty percent is economically destructive as it capable of stimulating negative spill overs on the economy due to growing taxes and public debt repayment. Hence, public sector spending should be significantly less than forty percent or at most forty percent for purpose of economic growth. This indeed translates to enforcing responsible fiscal policy centred on forty percent public sector size.
Ambya Ambya
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 119-128; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.119-128

Abstract:
Human development index (HDI) is one of the benchmarks used to see the quality of human life as measured by looking at the level of human life quality of education, health and economy. This study aims to determine the effect of government spending from the education, health and capital expenditure sectors as well as income on the human development index. The data used is a secondary data in 7 districts in Lampung Province period of 2013-2018 which was obtained from the Directorate General of Fiscal Balance (DGFB Ministry of Finance) and the Central Statistics Agency (CSA) in Lampung province. The results of the analysis show that the government spending in the education sector and capital expenditure have a positive and significant effect on the human development index while the health sector spending as well as income have a negative and significant effect on the human development index.
Gusni Gusni, Nugraha Nugraha
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 95-102; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.95-102

Abstract:
Portfolio asset allocation decisions are not passive as mention in the modern portfolio theory, because many factors that can influence it. The purpose of this study is to explain the portfolio asset allocation decisions based on the results of previous research studies by using a meta-analysis approach. The meta-analysis was carried out from a systematic review of the literature review. This study uses secondary data gathered from the various reputable journal by using 14 relevance research that has been published for the period of 2005 – 2019. The result explains that various empirical evidence of many studies on portfolio asset allocation decisions systematically can provide an overview of research trends and types of research conducted by researchers. Most of the studies are quantitative research, use a more behavioral approach, and provide new insights related to factors that can influence investors in making portfolio asset allocation decisions
Netty Herawaty, Riski Hernando
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 103-118; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.103-118

Abstract:
This study aims to analyze whether there is an influence of internal control on fraud prevention and Good Corporate Governance, and to analyze whether there is an effect of Good Corporate Governance on fraud prevention, and to analyze internal control against fraud prevention with Good Corporate Governance as intervening variable (Study at the Regional Government of Jambi City). This research method uses primary data by distributing questionnaires to all SKPDs of the Jambi City government with 49 respondents using purposive sampling and returning 47 questionnaires. Methods of data analysis using SEM-PLS analysis (Structural Equation Modeling-Partial Least Square). The results of the study show that internal control does not affect fraud prevention, internal control does not affect Good Corporate Governance and Good Corporate Governance does not affect fraud prevention.
Agil Novriansa, Ahmad Subeki, Aryanto Aryanto
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 87-94; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.87-94

Abstract:
Previous research has mostly examined the phenomenon of escalation of commitment in the context of decision making by managers in an investment project. However, in the capital budgeting process, before making investment decisions managers tend to consider information produced by accountants. This study examines the phenomenon of escalation of commitment using the perspective of supporting role of accountants as the party that provides information for investment decision making by managers, especially in the presence of sunk costs. This study uses a laboratory experimental method. The sample in this study are 156 undergraduate students majoring in Accounting who had passed Financial Accounting and Management Accounting courses. Based on the results of the independent sample t-test, it shows that accountants who experienced sunk cost conditions tend to provide reports that directed managers towards escalation of commitment behavior compared to accountants who do not experience sunk cost conditions. The presence of sunk cost makes accountants have better mind frame to get the possibility of profit compared with a definite loss so that the decisions they make tend to provide reports that lead to the escalation of commitment behavior.
Tertiarto Wahyudi, Yusnaini Yusnaini, Agil Novriansa
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 4, pp 129-138; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v4i2.129-138

Abstract:
Several empirical studies have shown that decision makers tend to experience an escalation of commitment bias, namely a tendency to continue investment projects that are less profitable, even though there is information of the less profitable project performance and that other available alternative investment opportunities are more profitable in the future. This study aims to improve the manager's decision making behavior model by considering the ethical environment as one of the factors that influence investment project evaluation decisions. More specifically, this study empirically examines the ethical environment as a strategy to reduce the tendency for escalation of commitment behavior. This study uses a laboratory experimental method with a 2 x 2 factorial experimental design between subject with adverse selection (present / absent) and ethical environment (strong / weak). The research sample consisted of 246 undergraduate and postgraduate students in Accounting and Management who acted as investment project managers. Based on ANOVA analysis results, it shows that managers who experience adverse selection conditions tend to continue unfavorable projects (conduct escalation of commitment). In addition, the results of this study also show that the tendency of managers to end investment projects that are not profitable for managers who are in a condition of a strong ethical environment will be greater when they experience adverse selection conditions compared to when they do not experience it.
Maryam Ma'Aruf Yakubu, Umar Ibrahim Abbas, Umaru Zubairu
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 1, pp 157-172; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v1i2.157-172

Abstract:
This paper conducted a systematic review of organizational ethics (OE) articles published over the last two decades, 2000-2020. This paper utilized the Systematic Quantitative Assessment Technique to identify 58 OE articles published by six of the most popular academic publishers in the world: Emerald, Elsevier, Sage, Springer, Taylor and Francis, and Wiley. The review covered five key issues: 1) Time distribution, 2) Geographic distribution, 3) Article type, 4) Data collection methods, and 5) Themes explored. The findings of the systematic review revealed that interest in OE waxed and waned over the two decades covered by this review, and that Africa and South America. The spread between conceptual and empirical OE articles were quite balanced, and survey was the most popular data collection method. Nine themes were identified, with the most striking findings being that having a strong and positive ethical climate had a positive impact on employee and organizational outcomes.
Emmanuel Busuyi Oguntomi, Sunday Osahon Igbinedion
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 1, pp 111-130; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v1i2.111-130

Abstract:
For the past three decades the world has witnessed an unprecedented rise in remittance. This upsurge has necessitated researches in its potential impacts on the various facets of development. In spite of the surging interest on the impact of remittance, there has been paucity of researches on the impact of remittance volatility on health outcomes. This study therefore seeks to investigate the nexus between remittance volatility and life expectancy at birth within the Nigeria context, utilizing the Fully Modified Ordinary Least Squares (FMOLS) and Error Correction Model (ECM) for the period 1981 to 2018. Findings suggest that while remittance volatility has statistically significant negative impact on life expectancy in the long-run, it was however positive but insignificant in the short-run. Other factors such as income, education status and public health expenditure were also found to be major determinants of life expectancy in Nigeria. Given that remittances are largely susceptible to external shocks, and are beyond the control of policy makers in the recipient countries, relevant measures should be put in place in the home front to significantly cushion the negative impact of such fluctuations on life expectancy in the long-run.
Lia Febria Lina
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 1, pp 147-156; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v1i2.147-156

Abstract:
One of the characteristics of industry 4.0 is that consumers increasingly want products to be made just for themselves. This can be supported by the presence of big data, which of course cannot be separated from the use of information, the more complete the data, the more precise and accurate the targeting will be. However, the use of information for some people can also be considered a violation of privacy. Various research about personalized advertising been tested and have yielded mixed results both positive and negative on perceptions and behaviour, and provide directions for next research to testing various consumer factors as moderating variable. This study aims to fill the gaps in previous research by examining the role of consumer privacy concerns as a moderating variable that affects the relationship of personalized advertising on the perceived advertising value of consumers using a survey method on 131 respondents who are active users of Instagram in Indonesia. The findings of this study that advertising personalization have a positive effect on advertising value and purchase intention and privacy concerns do not moderate the effect of personalized advertising on advertising value. This is influenced by the factor of respondents aged 17-25 years, where they can be said to be the Tech Savvy generation. Further research suggestions are also discussed in this study.
Aderopo Adediyan, Osayuwamen Lillian Omorenuwa
SRIWIJAYA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS, Volume 1, pp 131-146; https://doi.org/10.29259/sijdeb.v1i2.131-146

Abstract:
This paper is on the analysis of human capital investment and labour productivity in a situation of a rising incidence of poverty in Nigeria on a sectoral basis between 1986 and 2019. Adopting the Autoregressive Distributive Lag (ARDL) technique, three sectors were considered in the analysis: the agricultural, industrial and service sectors. Key in the results of the study is in two folds. In the first case, there is a direct positive effect of human capital investment on labour productivity, and a direct negative impact of poverty on labour productivity across the three sectors. In the second case, poverty decreases the contribution of human capital investment to labour productivity growth in the agricultural and industrial sectors in the short run only. But there is insufficient evidence on this in the service sector.
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