Journal Information
EISSN : 1544-4740
Current Publisher: Walden University (10.5590)
Total articles ≅ 9
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Marquay Marquay Edmondson, Capitol Technology University, Walter R. Walter R. McCollum, Walden University, Mary-Margaret Mary-Margaret Chantre, Capitol Technology University, Gregory Gregory Campbell, Walden University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.01

Abstract:
Agencies from various disciplines supporting law enforcement functions and processes have integrated, shared, and communicated data through ad hoc methods to address crime, terrorism, and many other threats in the United States. Data integration in law enforcement plays a critical role in the technical, business, and intelligence processes created by users to combine data from various sources and domains to transform them into valuable information. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore the current conditions of data integration frameworks through user and system interactions among law enforcement organizational processes. Further exploration of critical success factors used to integrate data more efficiently among systems of systems and user interactions may improve crime and intelligence analysis through modern applications and novel frameworks.
Navneet Kaur Navneet Kaur Bajwa, Thapar University, Harjot Harjot Singh, Thapar University, Kalyan Kumar Kalyan Kumar De, Amity University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.08

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Tom Tom Coughlan, Mercy College, David J Fogarty, Sara R Fogarty
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.03

Abstract:
Given the dramatic increase in the number of expatriates living and working abroad, there is a need to advance the research into how to make sure these employees achieve success on their assignments. Often, these expatriates assume managerial roles and are intended to be the gatekeepers of information. Typically, this information is necessary for the success of their colleagues, in both their home country and their host country. The expatriate’s role is to facilitate the integration of organizational knowledge from both their home and host countries, as well as key sources in their host country’s local environment. However, historically, there has been an exceptionally high failure rate in expatriate engagements. There are various factors discussed in the literature related to this failure rate including the stress of cultural integration and isolation from family. This often interferes with the expatriate being able to perform of their key responsibilities, which is to innovate. This research will launch pilot studies to investigate the use of social media, and computer mediated communications, to develop virtual proximity, its effects on cultural integration, the maintenance of professional relationships on a global scale, and its effect on the reduction of stress and the innovation process.
Irbha Irbha Magotra, Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, Jyoti Sharma, Supran Kumar Sharma, Follow, Jyoti Sharma, Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, Supran Kumar Sharma, Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.05

Abstract:
The introduction of self-service technologies (SSTs) in the banking industry has been emerging as one of the significant business drivers that facilitate customers in operating their bank accounts. Considering this, the present study has made an attempt to pierce the existing literature with reference to the adoption of SSTs among banking customers. Particularly, the intent of the present article is to explore various personal (e.g., optimism, socioeconomic characteristics) and technology characteristics (e.g., perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use) that affect the acceptance of SSTs among the banking customers. Based on a review of the literature, a conceptual model for SST adoption has been proposed, thereby suggesting a roadmap for future research based on the gaps identified in the research concerning this area.
Susan A. Susan A. Dean, Walden University, Julia I. Julia I. East, Walden University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.02

Abstract:
Technical skills are no longer enough for workers to compete in this highly competitive global work environment. Soft skills are of paramount importance. A multiple-case-study design through the lens of emotional intelligence formed the basis of the research study. The focus of the research was identification of the successful soft skills training strategies in the logistics industry. Three logistics organization leaders in the counties of Burlington, Middlesex, and Somerset, New Jersey, were participants in the study. Data were collected through semistructured interviews and the review of company documents Four themes emerged through data analysis of converging multiple data sources: (a) the use of a combination of group and individual training, (b) the identification of training needs by individual, (c) the use of a systematic method to resolve emotional behaviors at work, and (d) the importance of effective communication.
William Joseph William Joseph Henkel, Park University, Southern New Hampshire University, Al C Al C. Endres, Walden University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.06

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Independent Researcher Serkan Bayraktaroglu, Vasfi Vasfi Kahya, Dumlupinar University, Erhan Erhan Atay, Monash University Malaysia, Independent Researcher Habibe Ilhan
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.04

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lyndon Lyndon Augustine, Capitol Technology University, Walter Walter McCollum, Walden University, Richard Richard Brown, Capitol Technology University, Phoenix Phoenix Mourning-Star, The George Washington University
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2019.18.1.09

Abstract:
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are infections that occur in patients during their time of care in a hospital. Considerable emphasis is currently placed on reducing HAIs through improving hand-hygiene (HH) compliance among healthcare professionals because HAIs are a critical challenge to public health in the United States. By focusing on meeting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HH standards, the purpose of this qualitative research was to explore how noncompliance with these standards and lack of technology usage affect HAIs in the intensive care unit. Additionally, the goal of this research was to explore behavioral factors and best practices that influence compliance rates in intensive care units. Thereafter, the researcher provided recommendations for healthcare leadership to address the phenomenon of HAIs
Dattatraya V Dattatraya V. Bhise, Dronacharya Group of Institutions, Vivek K Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Lokmanya Tilak College of Engineering
Published: 1 January 2019
IJAMT, Volume 18; doi:10.5590/ijamt.2018.18.1.07

Abstract:
Intense competition, demanding customers, and shortening product life cycles are prompting small- and medium-sized enterprises to invest in advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). Small manufacturers often depend on large manufacturers for orders and so require design as well as manufacturing flexibility on their part. One way of achieving the flexibility is through adoption of AMTs. The decision to invest in AMT is a major decision and thus requires proper consideration to all the aspects of the implementation process before a final commitment is made. Although the technical capabilities of AMTs are well proven, neither practitioner nor academics agree upon a framework for its successful implementation. Using Churchill’s model (Steps 1 and 2) and drawing a link from the available literature, a theoretical framework is developed for the successful implementation of AMTs in small- and medium-sized enterprises. Three implementation phases—namely, planning, preimplementation, and postimplementation—with 14 major issues have been developed; 52 constituent factors have been identified from these issues through literature review and interviews with industry professionals.
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