Journal of Nursing Education and Practice

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1925-4040 / 1925-4059
Published by: Sciedu Press (10.5430)
Total articles ≅ 1,785
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Natalie Busath, , Melissa Chao,
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n11p28

Abstract:
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a lack of consistent guidance despite pressing questions from health professionals regarding how to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2 while also providing optimal maternal and child health care. In response, the “COVID-19, Maternal and Child Health, and Nutrition” literature repository was assembled, mobilizing a team of graduate students to provide concise summaries of emerging peer-reviewed publications. What began as a small trickle of evidence from China quickly grew into an overwhelming amount of information – roughly 120-150 publications per week pertaining to maternal and child health in the context of COVID-19. The authors present their experiences constructing, staffing, maintaining, and disseminating this literature repository while also providing opportunities for growth and learning for the graduate student volunteers who made it possible. Many of these students also served on the frontlines of the pandemic as healthcare providers, often sharing how helpful it was for their work with patients to stay up to date with emerging research. This case study is intended to serve as a blueprint for current and future repositories, particularly those that aim to incorporate service learning into graduate education.
Thomas R. Mikkelsen, Camilla B. Breer, Kari K. Nissen, Karin Christiansen
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n11p9

Abstract:
Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of genetics/genomics (G/G) knowledge and competencies in a Danish nursing context. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, thirteen Danish nurses representing different parts of the Danish health care system were interviewed about their experiences with G/G in daily practice. One focus group interview was conducted face to face, and nine individual semi-structured interviews were conducted partly face to face, partly online due to Covid-19 restrictions. Data were analyzed through systematic text condensation using the NVIVO13 tool (QSR International). Results: We identified five themes: 1) The nature of genetics; 2) Knowledge about genetics; 3) The roles of the nurse; 4) Nurses’ engagement with patients and relatives; 5) Patient pathways. Ethics was a recurrent theme in all five themes. Conclusions: The Danish nurses interviewed generally hold a narrow understanding of genetics i.e. defining it as heredity. They are involved in G/G aspects of care, although the extent and nature of this involvement varies considerably between different care settings. Hence, it seems unlikely that all nurses will require the same G/G knowledge and competencies. Nevertheless, the nurses share the belief that they should possess some basic knowledge about G/G to perform adequate nursing care. Their current knowledge about G/G is typically informed by practice and to a very small degree by their formal education. They agree that G/G literacy will be a general requirement in future nursing. Some of the nurses consider personalized medicine to be the golden road to better patient treatment and care. Some request more knowledge about G/G topics and a vocabulary to communicate adequately with doctors, patients and relatives on these issues. The importance of ethics is emphasized throughout the interviews.
Suthida Intaraphet, Pranee Saedkong, Srisuda Lunput, Sayan Kaewboonruang, Rathiporn Leethongdee, Wacharee Amornrojanavaravutti
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n11p35

Abstract:
Background and objective: Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important step in advancing the education of health professionals. This study aimed to evaluate IPE learning outcomes and satisfaction of students that participated in a school-health program. The program was delivered as a joint collaborative topic among nursing, dental public health, and public health students. We also sought to examine students’ understanding of roles and teamwork, as well as their satisfaction with IPE. Methods: This study had a quasi-experimental design. Third-year nursing students were randomly divided into 2 groups, the IPE and non-IPE groups. All third-year dental public health students and public health students were enrolled in the IPE group. All IPE students were stratified and randomized into interprofessional teams of ten or eleven students. The program included 3 modules: 1) foundational workshops for IPE role clarification in the school-health program and situation analysis of school-health problems, 2) project planning and implementation, and 3) evaluation and sharing. Non-IPE nursing students also received the same 3 modules of the school-health learning program without working in the interprofessional team. A pretest and posttest on school-health theoretical content were completed by both groups of nursing students. In the IPE group, we collected data regarding the understanding of students’ roles within their teams before and after the course. Satisfaction with IPE learning was only asked after the course. Results: The IPE group (n = 164) consisted of 60 nursing, 59 dental public health, and 45 public health students. There were 63 nursing students in the non-IPE group. For knowledge on school health, the nursing students in the non-IPE group had a significantly higher pretest score compared to the IPE group; while there was no significant difference in post-test scores between both groups. All aspects of the interprofessional collaboration among the three health professional student groups in the IPE group increased, with a significant difference for 4 out of 6 aspects. Students were satisfied with the IPE program and wished to extend their time spent in the program. Conclusions: IPE learning provides a better understanding of different healthcare roles and enhanced teamwork between multidisciplinary teams. Incorporating IPE as a learning strategy is recommended for health professional students.
Daniel Terry, Blake Peck, Alicia J. Perkins, Wendy Burgener
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n11p18

Abstract:
Objective: Nursing shortages have led to an increased student nurse education and a greater need for work integrated learning among limited health services. A Communities of Practice student placement model was developed to address this deficit, while facilitating greater peer-to-peer learning, and incidental, yet essential, support and learning between junior and senior students. An exploratory study was undertaken to examine the experiences of key stakeholders, students and clinical staff regarding the Communities of Practice model. Methods: After implementation interviews were conducted with six (n = 6) students and three (n = 3) nursing staff, two (n = 2) nurse managers, and one (n = 1) clinical educator. Interviews examined the benefits and challenges of the new model, while further guiding its refinement. Interview data were analysed thematically. Results: The Communities of Practice student placement model, although met with initial hesitancy, was indicated to be a positive learning experience for all participants. Specifically, five key themes emerged, including increased support for junior students, extended learning among senior students, unexpected discoveries for staff and students, workload decision-making and implications for staff, followed by the need for adaptability and further insights to modify the model. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the capacity to increase student placement numbers, while effectively increasing the level of support, mentorship, and learning among students, and assisting nurses in their roles. Overall, the model has also been suggested to offer the near-peer support desperately needed for junior students, while at the same time, offering more senior students the foundation upon which to develop their leadership skills.
Kelley L. Jackson, Sareen S. Gropper, Deborah D’Avolio, Dennis Hunt, David Newman
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n11p1

Abstract:
Background and objective: An adequate dietary protein intake is critical to preventing sarcopenia, a condition characterized by reductions in muscle mass, strength, and function. The objectives of this investigation were to determine the effectiveness and how telephone-based diet coaching by a nurse practitioner contributed to improving dietary protein intakes in middle-aged women. Methods: Middle-aged women were recruited, and those randomized to receive nutrition education (including a protein prescription) and weekly diet coaching (focused on improving protein intake) provided weekly responses to three semi-structured interview questions. Qualitative content analysis was used to examine the responses to these questions. Dietary protein intake was analyzed at baseline and the end of the 12-week study from three 24-hour diet recalls at each time point using diet-analysis software and repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Coached participants (n = 25) significantly increased dietary protein intake (55.3 ± 10.3 g at baseline to 83.7 ± 14.5 g/day at the end of the study); 19 of the 25 participants (76%) met their recommended dietary protein prescription by the study’s end. Three themes “Identifying Opportunities for Behavior Change”, “Beneficial Behavior Changes”, and “Tailoring Individual Interventions” were identified as a result of the coaching and led to the overarching theme “Empowered by Knowledge, Successful by Support” depicting how coaching contributed to the behavior changes. Conclusions: Nurse-led coaching is an effective approach enabling middle-aged women to improve dietary protein intake. These improvements are especially important in reducing the risk for the development of sarcopenia.
Lisa Roberts, Kelvin Cy Leung, Carmelle Peisah
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n10p7

Abstract:
Background and objective: The neglect of older people at the end of life in residential care documented in the Australian Royal Commission into Aged Care and Quality and Safety mandates urgent solutions to improve care. This integrative literature review aimed to explore the potential role of the palliative care nurse practitioner (PC-NP) in promoting quality end of life in residential care. Methods: Databases Medline, Emcare, PsychINFO and CINAHL were searched from January 2010 to April 2022. Full text of primary articles meeting inclusion criteria encompassing residents living in residential care settings, the role of the PC-NP in supporting quality dying were obtained and independently screened to determine final studies for review. Findings were thematically analysed. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed level of evidence and quality ratings for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Results: Of 12 articles meeting eligibility criteria, four specifically focused on the PC-NP or the palliative care nurse in residential care, seven examined the generic nurse practitioner role, and one the aged care nurse role in supporting palliative care. Themes common to all roles including positive patient outcomes, advance care planning, hospital avoidance, staff education and enhanced communication with families. Themes specific to the PC-NP included meeting end-of-life needs, end-of-life prescribing, and enhancing the role of the General Practitioner. Conclusions: Although reflected in only a handful of studies, this integrative review has provided preliminary insights into potential contributions of the PC-NP to quality end-of-life care for residential care residents.
Alena Grewal, Angela Silvestri-Elmore
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n10p24

Abstract:
Objective: A primary goal in clinical learning is to apply nursing knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to clinical. While benefits to learning in clinical are evident, this experience is not without challenges, which often relate to coordination of the learning experience. The AM/PM model, an innovative clinical learning model, was developed in response to scheduling challenges that impacted learning. Methods: A Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at a state university in the western region of the United States was using a 12-hour biweekly shift schedule for clinical rotations. This schedule negatively impacted learning. Thus, a 6-hour weekly (AM/PM) clinical learning model was developed and implemented to address barriers in clinical learning, using Lewin’s Theory of Change as the theoretical framework and as a guide to achieving the desired change. Standardized examination performance was used as a measure of success to evaluate summative learning. Results: Clinical learning was improved as a result of implementing the AM/PM model. Nursing students had more opportunity to develop critical thinking, clinical judgment, and communication skills. Learning outcomes measured by standardized exam scores increased for the AM/PM groups. Discussion and conclusions: The AM/PM model, in comparison to other traditional clinical models, was successful in providing experiences to support critical thinking, clinical judgment, and improved learning outcomes. Using Lewin’s Theory of Change as a theoretical framework to guide implementation of the AM/PM model supported all key stakeholders in adapting to the change, ultimately supporting nursing student learning.
Natana De Morais Ramos, Italo Lennon Sales de Almeida, Ismael Brioso Bastos, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de Carvalho
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n10p31

Abstract:
Objective: To identify scientific evidence about the main technologies used to prevent falls in hospitalized patients. Methods: A scoping review was carried out. Studies available in English, Portuguese, or Spanish, aiming to identify technologies to reduce the risk of falls in hospital settings in the adult and elderly population, were included. No time limit was applied. Results: Thirty articles were included in the review. The countries with the highest number of studies on the subject were the United States and Brazil. The technological solutions found include mobile applications, protocols, and software. From this list, the main technological solutions were mobile applications. Conclusions: Technologies such as mobile applications offer portability and ease in transmitting information, becoming a tool to enhance the quality of healthcare practices. The use of technological solutions to provide medical care for the elderly population is promising as such tools assist in critical training and guide patients to achieve healthy living. Technology helps in interpersonal and professional relationships. Further studies exploring new solutions or technologies are needed to build upon the existing knowledge of strategies to improve healthcare quality.
Majda Hameed Almasoodi, Hala Yehia Sayed Ali
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n10p45

Abstract:
Background: Role transition involves concerted efforts to optimize the transformation of the nursing students into practice nurses with an outstanding experience. Nursing students have different expectations and perceptions towards the role transition process. Graduate nurses lack the competence and sufficient preparation for the ever-changing professional nursing practice. The study purposed to assess the role transition of baccalaureate nursing students from the Umm Al Qura University. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to gather insights from a simple random sample (n = 102) of baccalaureate nursing students from Umm Al Qura University. Data were collected using an electronic self-administered questionnaire from year four and interns nursing students at Umm Al Qura University. Results: Results indicate that baccalaureate nursing students define role transition as role preparation, role competence, support, and organization. The three elements reveal different personal and organizational factors contributing to the assumption of new roles as registered nurses. Role preparation entails the provision of course content, management skills, teamwork, and multidisciplinary care. Role competence comprised the attainment of fundamental skills while nursing students expected to receive support from the healthcare organizations and the university. Conclusions: Role transition encompasses role preparation, role competence, support, and organization for the nursing students. Future studies should investigate the contributing factors to the feedback process between the nursing interns or final year students and the RNs or CNMs in the clinical practice during role transition.
Cynthia M. Thomas, Constance E. McIntosh, Ruthie LaMar
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v12n10p16

Abstract:
Background: Nursing students are prone to inadequate sleep but not fully aware of personal health risks, potential safety and quailty of care issues. Poor sleep hygiene can impact cognition, aleartness, cognitive speed, and accuracy of tasks completion, lower grades, fatigue and depression. Methods: This descriptive study addressed quantitative data from a 4-point Likert scale and open-ended questions. Nursing students from the National Student Nurse Association enrolled in an associate or baccalaureate program and having had at least one clinical experience were invited to particiate in the study. Results: Results indicate the amount of sleep needed is not being achieved. Participants reported ingesting substances to stay awake and to induce sleep. Nineteen percent of students reported making an error during a clinical experience. Conclusions: Students may be naive in thinking short- and long-term use of sleep-inducing aides and stimulants for wakefulness pose no risks to personal safety and safety of patients. By identifying and addressing systemic causes of nursing students lack of sleep using a comprehensive approach to educate, impose consequences, and promote sleep hygiene at the local and national levels, students will have fewer reasons and justifications for not achieving adequate sleep.
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