Biological Psychiatry

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ISSN / EISSN : 0006-3223 / 1873-2402
Current Publisher: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 25,192
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, , Slavina B. Goleva, , Michela Traglia, Raymond K. Walters, Christopher Hübel, Jonathan R.I. Coleman, Gerome Breen, Anders D. Børglum, et al.
Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89, pp 1127-1137; doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2020.12.024

Abstract:
Background The origin of sex differences in prevalence and presentation of neuropsychiatric and behavioral traits is largely unknown. Given established genetic contributions and correlations, we tested for a sex-differentiated genetic architecture within and between traits. Methods Using European ancestry genome-wide association summary statistics for 20 neuropsychiatric and behavioral traits, we tested for sex differences in SNP-based heritability (SNP-h2) and genetic correlation (rg<1). For each trait, we computed per-SNP z-scores from sex-stratified regression coefficients and identified genes with sex-differentiated effects using a gene-based approach. We calculated correlation coefficients between z-scores, to test for shared sex-differentiated effects. Finally, we tested for sex differences in across-trait genetic correlations. Results We observed no consistent sex differences in SNP- h2. Between-sex, within-trait genetic correlations were high, although <1 for educational attainment and risk-taking behavior. We identified four genes with significant sex-differentiated effects across three traits. Several trait pairs shared sex-differentiated effects. The top genes with sex-differentiated effects were enriched for multiple gene sets, including neuron- and synapse-related sets. Most between-trait genetic correlation estimates were not significantly different between sexes, with exceptions (educational attainment and risk-taking behavior). Conclusions Sex differences in the common autosomal genetic architecture of neuropsychiatric and behavioral phenotypes are small and polygenic, and unlikely to fully account for observed sex-differentiated attributes. Larger sample sizes are needed to identify sex-differentiated effects for most traits. For well-powered studies, we identified genes with sex-differentiated effects that were enriched for neuron-related and other biological functions. This work motivates further investigation of genetic and environmental influences on sex differences.
Raozhou Lin, Lisa N. Learman, Chan-Hyun Na, Santosh Renuse, Kevin T. Chen, Po Yu Chen, Gum-Hwa Lee, , Susan M. Resnick, Juan C. Troncoso, et al.
Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89, pp 1058-1072; doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2020.10.012

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Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.04.014

Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/s0006-3223(21)01276-2

Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/s0006-3223(21)01229-4

Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/s0006-3223(21)01228-2

Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/s0006-3223(21)01232-4

, Robert M. Sapolsky
Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89; doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2020.12.014

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Sofia Leal Santos, Michelle Stackmann, Andrea Muñoz Zamora, Alessia Mastrodonato, Allegra V. De Landri, Nick Vaughan, Briana K. Chen, Marcos Lanio,
Published: 1 June 2021
Biological Psychiatry, Volume 89, pp 1150-1161; doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.01.005

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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