Journal of Career and Technical Education

Journal Information
EISSN : 1533-1830
Published by: Virginia Tech Libraries (10.21061)
Total articles ≅ 211
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Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 34; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v34i1.a1

Abstract:
This study examined students’ participation in college and career preparation activities in high school, and the relationship between participation in these activities and students’ education and work attainment within one year of high school graduation. This study used the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:2009) dataset and participants included 12,217 public school students with 6,046 (49.49%) boys and 6,171 (50.51%) girls. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression. Results indicate that socioeconomic status was the only significant predictor across all post-high school education and work outcomes. Significant predictors of post-high school education/work attainment were found but differed depending on which outcomes (i.e., education and/or work) were being considered.
Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 34; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v34i1.a2

Abstract:
One of the stated goals of career and technical education (CTE) is to improve the labor market outcomes of participants. One population of students for which concentration CTE may be particularly beneficial is those who determine they will not pursue postsecondary education. By exploring how occupational concentration—defined as earning three or more credits in a specific CTE cluster—relates to labor market outcomes for non-college participants, this study adds to a growing body of research on the benefits of CTE participation. In an effort to gain a more nuanced understanding of these labor market benefits, the current study further disaggregates these potential benefits across different CTE categories. Using a nationally representative dataset to explore the CTE concentration association with eventual earnings, results indicated that occupational concentration in general links to increased wages. However, these benefits are limited to a few specific CTE categories: health sciences, trades, and agriculture and natural resources. Implications for individual students, practitioners, and policymakers are discussed.
Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 33; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v33i1.a2

Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to examine the input factors and outcomes within the student motivational profile (SMP) that may affect the self-determination of students who elected to enroll in an agricultural education career academy was conducted. This study introduces the organismic socio-behavioral perspective (OSBP), which was developed to inform educational interventions on student motivation and engagement from a more holistic perspective. Among the 114 urban high school student respondents, those who reported having a choice in the decision to enroll in the comprehensive agriculture program were more likely to have self-determined types of academic motivation, academic satisfaction, and higher levels of perceived effort. Limitations within the SMP to measure moderate to strong associations with academic achievement were identified and recommendations on how to address these limitations were discussed. The study is intended to introduce a line of inquiry toward developing an inventory that identifies measurable factors that impact student engagement and achievement.
Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 33; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v33i1.a3

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the nation’s baccalaureate agriculture teacher education programs of study to synthesize current coursework requirements. Sixty-five baccalaureate programs of study were analyzed. The mean number of semester credit hours was 125.2, and the mean number of credit hours in the areas of professional knowledge, technical knowledge, and general knowledge were 37.8, 42.0, and 36.6, respectively. Great variability was found within these descriptive measures when observing the standard deviation, minimum and maximum values, and configuration of courses within each category. We recommend the profession engage in intense and deliberate conversations on how to best design programs of study at the national level. These conversations would provide the opportunity for the collective wisdom of the profession garnered through investigation of the literature and sharing of knowledge gained through personal experiences, which can be used to inform the decision making process at individual institutions.
Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 33; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v33i1.a1

Abstract:
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) recruitment programs are growing at post-secondary institutions in response to the national shortage of trained workers in STEM fields. Many programs prove effective in recruiting students into STEM majors with research indicating the benefits of experiential learning activities in program outcomes. This study qualitatively examined the experiences of first-year undergraduate students in a STEM-focused career planning class within a STEM recruitment program. Findings illuminated the importance of STEM faculty guest lectures and research lab visits in providing meaningful opportunities to learn more about specific STEM fields and to make career decisions. Recommendations for programmatic improvements are also made based on critical feedback on the structure and content of these experiential activities.
Journal of Career and Technical Education, Volume 32; https://doi.org/10.21061/jcte.v32i1.1590

Abstract:
Research has demonstrated career and technical education (CTE) programs have a strong positive influence on secondary students’ behavior, attendance, academic achievement, and college persistence. Critical success factors common to career academies, small schools, and CTE programs include socio-emotional support and community, along with a culture of high expectations and student engagement. Yet little research has been conducted on social and cultural factors involved in these programs’ success. This qualitative study focused on one high school healthcare education program in the Mid-Atlantic to identify the social and cultural critical success factors that contributed to successful student outcomes. Through classroom observations; interviews with administrators, teachers, partners, program graduates, and parents; surveys of graduates; and focus groups with current students, the following critical success factors emerged: learning environment and community, focused student support, engagement through a real-world context, and a culture of professionalism. These findings may help educators and districts focus their attention and efforts on the critical factors that impact student success as they seek to expand and improve CTE programs.
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