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Natasha Jenkins
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.459

Abstract:
The academic library’s role in teaching and learning on campus is vital to institutional initiatives. Melissa N. Mallon drives this point home by addressing the role of the library instruction program and the instruction coordinator in nine skillfully crafted chapters. Each chapter highlights the library’s agenda for teaching and learning within the greater context of its institution. Partners in Teaching and Learning is the eighth title to be published in the Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series, which publishes titles that contribute significantly to library and information sciences. The book is written in a way that offers practical resources and strategies for a multitude of instruction programs.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.6.808

Abstract:
Women library professionals are greatly underrepresented in key leadership positions, especially in the developing countries. This study explored the women academic library leadership in Pakistan and investigated the major challenges faced by women leaders during their ascending to the top, the key indicator of their success, as well as the community services and professional contributions made by them during the course of their careers. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected by conducting in-depth interviews of 16 senior woman library leaders in Pakistan. The findings indicated that organizational challenges, family responsibilities, and gender discrimination were the major barriers that hindered the women leaders during their career progression. The key indicators of their success were effective use of technology, professional commitment, academic contributions, community services, family support, international exposure, and continuous learning. The implications of the study highlight the various areas of improvement for women library leadership.
Kathia Ibacache
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.6.927

Abstract:
In The Academic Teaching Librarian’s Handbook, Claire McGuinness, faculty in the School of Information and Communication Studies at the University College Dublin, offers comprehensive insights into different topics that are relevant to instruction librarians. These topics include the changing context of information literacy, social media and the rise of “fake news,” digital learning, and professional identity. The author also discusses the value of an articulated personal teaching philosophy, the importance of self-analysis and self-reflection, developing a teaching role as a new instruction librarian, and leadership and advocacy skills. McGuinness’ academic narrative style, set to small black font, is supported by a wide array of citations and data from reports and surveys. In addition, each topic offers “personal reflection points” along with figures and tables that highlight important details. The chapters conclude with exercises inviting readers to reflect on the content covered through different hypothetical scenarios.
Nora Almeida
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.455

Abstract:
When I started reading Anna Watkins Fisher’s The Play in the System: The Art of Parasitical Resistance, I was already in the middle of reading Olivia Laing’s Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency, a very different book that is also about intersections of art and sociopolitical reality. I mention Laing’s book here because she and Fisher both introduce “hospitality” as an important conceptual frame. To Laing, who borrows the term from John Berger, hospitality is about the potential for art to create critical openings that can help us connect and be free. For Fisher, hospitality, like everything else in the neoliberal, technocratic system(s) the title of the book references, has already been co-opted and redeployed as a tool for coercion.
Max Thorn
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.464

Abstract:
In Get the Job: Academic Library Hiring for the New Librarian, Meggan Press, the Undergraduate Education Librarian at Indiana University–Bloomington, has prepared a guidebook to the hiring process of the “strange and wonderful beast” (1) called academia. This slim volume covers everything from tips for deciding whether graduate school in library science is right for you to dealing with imposter syndrome as a new academic librarian. In between, Press, part Dante’s Virgil and part Emily Post, both demystifies the peculiar traditions and rules that govern the academic job search and instructs readers in the etiquette that the system expects.
Amy Wickner
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.466

Abstract:
Mutual Aid: Building Solidarity During This Crisis (and the Next) by Dean Spade is about creating and maintaining relationships, organizations, and projects that help people survive in crises, processes that together are known as “mutual aid.” Mutual aid helps people refuse to be disposed of and refuse to dispose of one another. In doing so, it offers the means to develop a better analysis of the conditions of people’s lives and builds capacity for sustained action to improve those conditions. Tending to one another through mutual aid opens doors to other forms of organizing. Among library workers, this book may be most useful to those who are fighting for better conditions in both workplaces and communities. Sustaining mutual aid, Spade argues, is a twofold matter. First, it involves a sense of being in struggle with: understanding one’s survival and liberation as being tied to others’ survival and liberation. Second, mutual aid expands the landscape of struggle by showing that empty stomachs, living unhoused, precarious and invisible labor, and institutionalization (in prisons, long-term care, and “digital poorhouses”) are each political and therefore sites of struggle.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.474

Abstract:
A content analysis of 62 job postings for East Asian studies librarians in the United States and Canada during 2008–2019 demonstrates that major job responsibilities have expanded to include collection development and management, reference and research assistance, instruction, liaison work, and outreach; relationship building and collaboration are emerging roles; skills and abilities have been progressively occupying a larger proportion than knowledge and experience in the required qualifications; top frequently required abilities and skills are generic and behavioral; and professional experiences are often preferred rather than required. The results of this research are of practical relevance to subject specialists in other areas.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.513

Abstract:
How do the personal epistemological beliefs of instruction librarians inform their teaching practices? By learning about their personal beliefs about knowledge acquisition, are librarians better equipped to create an environment more conducive to student learning? These questions informed a mixed-methods research study. Using the Approaches to Teaching Inventory, 283 teaching librarians answered 22 questions about their teaching practices and how they believe students learn. We interviewed 12 of these librarians to learn more about their teaching practices and epistemological beliefs. Seven themes emerged as influences on the instructional practices of librarians that ranged from learning biases to classroom tensions.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.182

Abstract:
The revitalization of Latin American Indigenous languages started many years ago, but only some university libraries in the United States have taken steps to advocate for preservation, access, inclusion, and diversity through collection building covering these languages and cultures. This study examines holdings of Quechua, Nahuatl, Guaraní, Zapotec, Maya, Mapudungun, and Aymara materials in 87 university libraries in the United States. This study seeks to answer the question: are university libraries in the United States supporting inclusion and diversity through the purchase of Latin American Indigenous language materials? In addition, the author explores what initiatives university libraries could take to further the revitalization and advancement of these Indigenous languages.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.199

Abstract:
With the advent of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in 2015, librarians everywhere have tried to adapt their existing information literacy sessions to incorporate the revised concepts. This article discusses how the librarian responsible for a series of four labs in a first-year course reformed the lab content around the six ACRL Frames. Student reflections from three semesters’ worth of classes were analyzed for content related to each of the six Frames, as well as for areas of enlightened understanding (evidence of crossing a threshold into higher understanding, as first outlined by Meyer and Land, 2003) and continued confusion, with applicability for all instructors trying to incorporate the Frames.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.219

Abstract:
Drawing on an original methodology using citations, downloads, and survey data, this paper analyzes journal usage patterns across 28 Canadian universities. Results show that usage levels vary across disciplines and that different academic platforms varied in their importance to different institutions, with for-profit platforms generally exhibiting lower usage. These results suggest economic inefficiencies exist in “big deal” academic journal subscriptions for universities, as most journals in such bundles are seldom or never used. We recommend that universities coordinate resource sharing and negotiate strategies with academic journal expenditures based on shared interests and usage trends.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.237

Abstract:
In the first study measuring sexual harassment experiences of academic library employees at a single institution, we conducted a census of 1,610 nonstudent employees at the 10-campus University of California Libraries system. This anonymous online survey measured how sexual harassment was experienced and observed in terms of behaviors, exhibitors, reporting and disclosure, institutional support and betrayal, and recommendations for future actions. Out of 579 respondents, 54% experienced and/or observed sexual harassment at work. Respondents recommended training, workplace culture change, support from leadership, and clear reporting processes in order to address sexual harassment at University of California Libraries.
Nimisha Bhat
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.286

Abstract:
In Reflections of Practitioner Research: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals, the authors acknowledge that conducting research is often at odds with the service orientation of the library and information science field. Not every library professional who conducts research has had formal training in conducting and publishing research, and so this book aims to serve the practitioner-researcher who is doing this research while working in a public service, whether that work is paid or voluntary, informal or formal. It is refreshing to see this book immediately widen the scope of who is considered a researcher: everyone working in a library setting regardless of type or experience who is pursuing a project can add that title to their list of professional identities. As the editors say in their introduction, the book “celebrates and tries to draw insights from the messiness of applying research methods” (x) in the face of all the limitations that library professionals experience, including juggling responsibilities, time, and institutional expectations. The chapters are written by a blend of novice and experienced practitioner-researchers from many different types of libraries who were encouraged to write in a first-person perspective “to promote the feeling of having a conversation with a colleague.” (xi) The book is thematically organized into three sections that are not designed to be read in a linear progression but rather allow the reader to freely navigate throughout to find guidance relevant for their own research journey. Every chapter describes a research project or technique from start to finish, often describing setbacks or barriers and how the author found a solution. Each chapter ends with a reflection section where the author/s acknowledge/s how the process went, providing recommendations for fellow practitioner-researchers who may be pursuing a similar project or method.
Meaghan Alston
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.287

Abstract:
Shelter in a Time of Storm by Jelani M. Favors explores the story of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and how they fostered student activism. In some ways this critical, but often overlooked, aspect of HBCU history has been part of my own understanding of the schools since childhood. I attended preschool and elementary school on the campus of South Carolina State University (SCSU), an HBCU in Orangeburg, South Carolina. My school lay in sight of Smith-Hammond-Middleton Memorial Center, which was named in honor of three students—Henry Smith (19), Samuel Hammond Jr. (18), and Delano Middleton (17)—shot and killed by South Carolina Highway Patrolmen during a 1968 student protest of a segregated bowling alley. The “Orangeburg Massacre,” as it came to be known, also resulted in injuries to 28 other protesters, all students from SCSU. While the sit-ins staged by the Greensboro Four or organizations like Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) might be the most well-known example of HBCU student activism, the truth is that the tradition of protest goes back much further. For those familiar with HBCUs or those with no prior knowledge of Black colleges, Shelter provides a powerful, insightful examination of the critical role HBCUs have played in fostering generations of foot soldiers in the struggle for freedom.
Scarlet Galvan
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.290

Abstract:
When should the government require information disclosure? Cass Sunstein attempts to answer this by offering a framework in his latest book, Too Much Information: Understanding What You Don’t Want to Know.
Jaime Taylor
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.294

Abstract:
While focus on the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic means that parts of this book will, we hope, soon feel dated, Can’t Pay Won’t Pay captures the economic zeitgeist of the early 21st century. A mere five chapters and just over 150 pages, the brevity of the book makes it an accessible introduction to the reasons so many individuals, communities, and even countries have found themselves deeply in debt. While fewer words are spent on remedies to the problem than describing it, the authors recommend the formation of debtors’ unions, modeled on labor unions. Through such unions, they suggest, collective power can force the abolition, or at least renegotiation, of debts. Can’t Pay Won’t Pay will help higher education librarians understand the conditions under which their students are laboring, as well as illuminating both the personal and systemic positions of librarians themselves.
Carrie Wade
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.296

Abstract:
A co-worker and I have a saying among ourselves: There ought to be a booklet about this stuff. Gillian “Gus” Andrews has attempted to write a booklet on a hot version of this stuff: the whole internet. It is an admirable attempt, but a gut instinct is to roll one’s eyes at the attempt. Can one write a (368-page) booklet on emotionally, technologically, socially, and politically navigating the quagmire that the modern web has become?
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.44

Abstract:
First-generation college students have a profound impact both inside and outside the classroom on the strategic goals of universities, yet in-depth, firsthand information about their experiences are difficult for researchers and university administrators to find. Oral histories are a data-rich method of collecting narratives that legitimize the perspectives of underrepresented communities whose stories are often absent from the written record. This article provides a brief overview of first-generation populations, a review of literature relating to the increasing involvement of libraries and archives in capturing and preserving the stories of underdocumented communities in the twenty-first century, and shares three case studies of first-generation initiatives at public universities in California, Colorado, and Nebraska.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.59

Abstract:
This study measured the relative academic impact of articles by LIS practitioners by analyzing library and information science articles published between 2005 and 2014. The results revealed that, although practitioners were not the main knowledge contributors, the academic impact of articles by practitioners was not significantly lower than that of articles by academics. No significant differences in academic impact were present between any two types of coauthored articles. Articles from academic–practitioner collaboration were cited earlier than articles from practitioner–practitioner and academic–academic collaborations. This study suggests that LIS practitioners appear to benefit from collaborative scholarship with LIS researchers through more citations and higher impact.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.19

Abstract:
Academic libraries around the world are cancelling big deal journal subscriptions at an increasing rate. This is primarily due to budgetary challenges, the unsustainable hyperinflationary pricing of these packages, and a need to move toward new open access models. It is a complex situation with many vested interests and stakeholders. Some libraries have been the target of angry backlash from faculty after such cancellations. The purpose of this qualitative study is to discover strategies for communicating to the campus community about collections cancellations so that they will better understand and support the library in making these difficult decisions.
Jeffrey Delgado
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.130

Abstract:
Xan Arch and Isaac Gilman create a necessary, at times difficult to discuss, piece of writing that should be used by academic libraries across the nation. Academic Library Services for First Generation Students brings forth the question of how to address best librarian practices for first-generation students. They argue that current practices cater to middle-class white students. The academic setting is shaped in such a way that first-generation students are viewed as needing “assistance” when the actual problem lies within the institution and its support systems. This book’s structure facilitates a rich understanding of the problems within these institutions while also offering concrete examples for academic libraries that want to do better. The book begins by describing the social context of first-generation students in higher education generally and then addresses academic libraries in particular. It finishes with examples of how to adapt institutions to better support these students.
Robin E. Brown
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.129

Abstract:
Jessica Schomberg and Wendy Highby begin with a very broad and thought-provoking discussion of the demographics of disability. Diagnosed “behavioral disorders and mental illness are on the rise while diagnosed physical impairments are decreasing” (15). Disablement is defined very broadly, as occurring where there is a mismatch between the environment and ability. Their review of the evolution of disability theory is effective.
Ginger H. Williams
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.135

Abstract:
This collection brings together research from the library and student affairs fields to present a thorough look at methods for increasing student success among populations with distinct needs and characteristics: international, transfer, first-generation, and re-entry students, with international and first-generation populations receiving the most attention. It is a welcome addition to the academic library literature. The theories of well-established student affairs scholars, such as George Kuh and Vincent Tinto, are highlighted in many chapters’ literature reviews and appear in the bibliographies of nearly all chapters. Familiarity with this literature is key in engaging outside units within the academy and building the kinds of partnerships suggested by many authors in this work. Common themes include robust partnerships with academic writing centers, collaborating with graduate programs to increase ESL students’ research and writing skills, and deliberately structuring assignments to aid student comprehension and skill development.
Richelle L. Witherspoon,
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.113

Abstract:
With attendance rates at library workshops and events in decline, the authors looked to data from practice to help the field move forward. Using survey responses from providers of 161 library workshops across Canada and the United States, the authors examined 10 key variables that are widely believed to impact attendance rates (topic, month, time, duration, advertising, location, target audience, series status, buy-in, and incentives). Analysis of the responses highlights several trends in attendance and offers a better understanding of what students are looking for from extracurricular educational opportunities like those provided by libraries.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.662

Abstract:
This study aims to examine information literacy (IL) and the use of mobile technologies in the educational sphere by a sample of social sciences undergraduate students (N = 1,390). The study used the MOBILE-APPS questionnaire, which is a scale for measuring students’ perceptions regarding information literacy (both the institutional and as a personal dimension), the threshold concepts of the ACRL Framework and the use of ICT and mobile technologies in learning contexts. The survey was distributed to a sample of four universities and eight Social Sciences degrees in Spain. A descriptive, inferential, and multivariate study is performed, regarding age, course, gender, and degree. The results show that student perception is higher concerning the personal dimension of IL; most of the students are unaware of the threshold concepts of the ACRL Framework, and responses are very heterogeneous in relation to the use of ICT and mobile technologies. An MDS-clustering strategy regarding the diverse degrees that participate in the study is also provided, to grasp a disciplinary view. From the diagnosis developed in this research, some recommendations for teaching activity in IL as well as implications for academic libraries are provided.
Nandi Prince
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.781

Abstract:
Editors Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby have assembled a work that contributes to many perspectives on service in the library. The collection presents 19 chapters of diverse individual experiences from library workers—most of whom are academics, with a few from public libraries. These perspectives deal with important issues of service in the profession as seen through the lenses of workers with specific group identities. These identities as presented by the authors include but are not limited to the disabled, gender identity and sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and stigmatization of fat bodies (terms used by the contributors).
Emily Drabinski
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.620

Abstract:
At the time of this writing, like many of you I’m sure, I am largely consumed with planning for a safe return to our physical buildings this fall. Information changes daily if not hourly. Budgets swing wildly as infusions of cash from federal sources do and don’t trickle down to the library’s bottom line. Vaccine mandates come with asterisks and exceptions. In between going round and round about safe ventilation when I don’t know more than I can google about HVAC and thinking through how much sanitizer, plexiglass, and vaccines we’ll need on hand to check out books in the coming academic year, I am reading Hester Blum’s masterful history of polar print culture, The News at the Ends of the Earth. As the climate warms in response to human industrialization, dead letters floated by balloon, buried in cairns, and stuffed into frozen tundra by European and American men seeking a northwest passage and a science of the southern hemisphere emerge from the ice. Drawing from these bits and pieces of arctic and Antarctic communication and the newspapers, playbills, and other print culture explorers made for each other, Blum describes how knowledge is constructed and shared under extreme conditions. As editor of the book reviews section of College & Research Libraries here in the Anthropocene, I have been working through such questions myself.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.683

Abstract:
This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and potential utility of using machine learning and natural language processing techniques to develop models that can reliably predict the relative difficulty of incoming chat reference questions. Using a relatively large sample size of chat transcripts (N = 15,690), an empirical experimental design was used to test and evaluate 640 unique models. Results showed the predictive power of observed modeling processes to be highly statistically significant. These findings have implications for how library service managers may seek to develop and refine reference services using advanced analytical methods.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.642

Abstract:
In a follow-up to a pilot study published in 2019, the authors collected student research papers from English Composition II courses at three public comprehensive universities from different regions in the United States to classify and compare the sources selected by students at each institution. Working with a representative sample of 712 bibliographic references, the authors used a research-tested taxonomy called The WHY Method to classify each source by three key attributes—Who wrote each source, How it was edited, and whY it was published. The results of this cross-institutional study indicate that student source selection is affected most powerfully by the variables of which institution a student attends, student age, and whether the student is a first-generation university student. Student GPA, gender, class ranking (freshman, sophomore, and so on), and ethnicity were not statistically predictive factors. This study establishes the importance of institutional context in how students construct authority and provides librarians with a tool that enables them to better understand and describe that context.
Richelle Brown
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.771

Abstract:
Shaun Slifer had never heard of the Appalachian Movement Press (AMP) when he was handed one of its publications while attending a wedding at the Appalachian South Folklife Center (ASFC) in Pipestem, West Virginia, in 2016. Neither had almost anyone else, as its history had gone largely undocumented. Slifer, the creative director of the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum in Matewan, West Virginia, was already aware of the rich and complex ways that cultural production, social movements, and historical collections can interact. He put that knowledge to use in recovering the history of a press that played a key role during a crucial decade of organizing for justice in Appalachia. So Much to Be Angry About: Appalachian Movement Press and Radical DIY Publishing, 1969–1979 is the informative result.
Jordan Hale
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.778

Abstract:
“I thought you didn’t want to see another map again,” my partner joked as I held up the book I was sent to review. Indeed, that’s a sentiment I uttered more than a few times three years ago, when I graduated from library school and went on the job market after 10 years of working in a university map collection and on several historical mapping projects. It was in these roles that I learned the nuances of digitization, visualization, and time-series data structures using geographic information systems (GIS) software. Over my time in the library, I became disillusioned with a number of trends not isolated to my workplace, including the fetishization of rare materials, the elision of labor, the detached overtheorization of “the archive,” and the extensive intellectual gatekeeping meant to exclude those seen as lacking the appropriate credentials and occupational categories to produce scholarship. Indeed, I thought I’d be the right person to take on Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to our Digital Era, given my expertise in the production, distribution, and access of (historical) maps. However, the book’s explorations break little new ground outside the domain of histories of cartography. The digital era promised in the book’s subtitle is not a point of arrival, as suggested, but an insistence that even more study into a format and genre that has seen considerable scholarly attention for centuries is needed, with minimal ethical engagement with the conditions of the production and reproduction of paper maps.
Annie Pho
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.2.292

Abstract:
Within the literature for library and information science (LIS) practitioners, there are a number of books published about information literacy and library instruction ranging from practical instruction cookbooks with activities and lesson plans, to books more focused on critical information literacy. Practitioners and students who are interested in reading about library instruction and teaching information literacy have many choices, but those who are new to the topic may not know where to start. Laura Saunders, an associate professor at the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons University, and Melissa A. Wong, an adjunct instructor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, wrote Instruction in Libraries and Information Centers: An Introduction as an open access textbook that is designed to teach and prepare anyone interested in library instruction, particularly library school students taking coursework in this area. For those who feel shy or intimidated about learning theory, Sanders and Wong take great care in breaking down each theoretical concept and providing ample examples throughout the book. The authors include reflective exercises that allow readers to pause and reflect on the reading. They make learning theory much more accessible and digestible to students and those who are new to these concepts. Each chapter provides the key theories and cites foundational scholarship in education and LIS; so, if there are particular areas that one might want to learn more about, they can explore the further readings.
Wendi A. Kaspar
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.472

Abstract:
When I initially thought about this special issue on the evolving role of academic librarians, the idea was to demonstrate how librarians are moving forward, as though towards an ultimate goal or higher understanding. I wanted to show that librarians are getting smarter, more in tune with their patrons and more adept at reaching for that pinnacle. On reflection, more than a year after the pandemic started, I am convinced that this evolution is not toward some grandiose end of universal enlightenment—but rather it is, as Darwin would have it, a response to the environment. Librarians have weathered the pandemic in much the same ways they have weathered the growth of the Internet (and the doomsayers that it would replace libraries), seasons of austerity and accountability in higher education and other forces, external and internal.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.584

Abstract:
Through a survey of more than 200 US academic science librarians, we investigated the perceived value of subject specialization; looked for trends toward or away from science subject specialization; and analyzed predictions about the future of science liaison librarianship. Results showed that science librarians perceive subject specialization positively and predict it will continue to be necessary in the future. They also perceive that liaison relationships will remain crucial. While functional roles appear to be growing, they were not seen as replacing traditional subject responsibilities. Results suggest a shift toward a more generalist approach; however, additional research is needed before stating this conclusively.
Diane Dias De Fazio
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.609

Abstract:
Dark Archives: A Librarian’s Investigation into the Science and History of Books Bound in Human Skin begins with a flashback, transporting readers to the exhibit halls of the Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, legendary home of historical objects of medical oddity, scandal, and intrigue. It was here, author Megan Rosenbloom recalls, that she first encountered books donated by Dr. Joseph Leidy and Dr. John Stockton Hough, visually nondescript yet captivating, because their covers were purportedly made using human epidermis. In 2015, after scientists Dr. Richard Hark and Dr. Daniel Kirby sampled and tested tiny bits of Leidy’s and Hough’s books, the Museum announced they had incontrovertible proof: the bookbindings were anthropodermic—bound in human skin. Rosenbloom, a self-declared “death-positive” journalist and librarian, joined forces with Hark, Kirby, and Mütter Museum Curator Anna Dhody that same year to form the Anthropodermic Book Project (ABP), and their collective bibliographic quest drives the narrative of Dark Archives.
Hannah Scates Kettler
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.612

Abstract:
Emma Annette Wilson has pulled together a very approachable and packed resource for aspiring Master of Library Science (MLS) students and those new to digital humanities (DH). The book is as easy to follow as it is informative, providing a balance between the practicality of various digital humanities methodologies, the development of those methodologies, and approaches to engage with them. The author does, at times, assume that, while you may not have a traditional library degree from which to draw, you have a cursory understanding of MLS-specific disciplines (such as cataloging). Yet, there is still ample discussion of relevant areas like metadata and insights into other types of librarianship activities that will be useful to DH project leads who are new to academic librarianship.
Alexandra Wieland
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.616

Abstract:
Published as part of the University of Massachusetts Press series on Studies in Print Culture and History of the Book, Placing Papers: The American Literary Archives Market is a well-written and fascinating history of how various stakeholders—and their differing motivations—shaped the literary archives trade in the United States of America. Amy Hildreth Chen, who holds a PhD in English from Emory University, previously was an academic librarian at the University of Iowa and now is an independent scholar. She traces the largely overlooked history of the trade in literary papers from its post-World War II origins through to the mid-2010s. The book comprises an introduction, conclusion, and six chapters. After a brief first chapter on the various values implicated in archives (financial, scholarly, and public), Placing Papers examines the literary archives market from the perspective of several key stakeholder groups: authors and their families (chapter 2), agents and dealers (chapter 3), directors and curators (chapter 4), archivists and digital archivists (chapter 5), and, finally, scholars and members of the public (chapter 6).
Bethany McGowan, ,
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.548

Abstract:
Conference attendance can play an important role in supporting the professional development of subject librarians by offering opportunities that allow librarians to learn about new services, strategies, and technologies while growing and maintaining professional networks. However, barriers such as accessibility challenges, budgetary and resource restrictions, difficulty measuring learning gains, and difficulty measuring the value of professional development when applied to the job can restrict opportunities for many librarians. Specialized regional conferences have the potential to reduce many of these barriers. How can librarians, library administrators, and conference organizers quantify the value of regional conference attendance as an accessible means for fostering librarian professional development? This paper examines five years of assessment data and participant feedback from attendees of a specialized regional conference for STEM librarians and measures participant learning and participant motivation for conference attendance. We propose specialized regional conferences, such as the Great Lakes Science Boot Camp for Librarians, as accessible and affordable continuing education opportunities that support the professional development of subject librarians.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.4.567

Abstract:
While many LIS publications have focused on Wikipedia, no LIS study has used intersectional class analysis to consider the site as a transmitter and reproducer of hegemonic ideology. Using both Antonio Gramsci and LIS theorist Michael Harris as starting points, this paper argues that Wikipedia is predicated on a philosophy of pluralism that serves as a transmitter of hegemonic ideology, thereby upholding the oppressive status quo. To counter this issue, the paper encourages librarians to embrace “critical editing”—an approach to Wikipedia editing built around an awareness of power, a penchant for critical literacy, a focus on desocialization, and an emphasis on self-education. The paper concludes with an example of critical editing praxis (dubbed the “Library Repository-to-Wikipedia” method) that research librarians and information professionals can replicate to counteract aspects of Wikipedia that inherently support the status quo and, thus, hegemonic ideology.
Megan Duffy
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.776

Abstract:
Perhaps more than ever, the emotional and mental health of students is understood to be essential for academic success. In addition to providing counseling services, colleges and universities have begun to explore other options for promoting student wellness; and, as Sara Holder and Amber Lannon note in this volume, the academic library has become the “logical home for wellness initiatives.” [1] In Student Wellness & Academic Libraries: Case Studies and Activities for Promoting Health and Success, editors Holder and Lannon have gathered together an in-depth collection of current research studies and wellness programs developed and implemented by academic librarians and educators.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.730

Abstract:
Academic libraries, together with their colleges and universities, are increasingly identifying first-generation college students as an underserved population that is likely to experience barriers to library access and usage. Less is known, however, about the information literacy skills of first-generation students, particularly in comparison with their continuing-generation counterparts. This study assessed the information literacy skills of first-generation college students in general education courses at Texas A&M University to inform information literacy instructional efforts and to inform advocacy efforts for developing substantial and sustained information literacy support for first-generation students at that campus. Study results indicate that first-generation students experience significant information literacy gaps in comparison with continuing-generation students at the same institution and in the same courses.
Iyra S. Buenrostro
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.773

Abstract:
While the act of defining typically underscores features that establish limits and exclusivity, this book honoring Richard J. Cox, a celebrated scholar, educator, mentor, and contributor to the archival discipline in the United States, does the opposite. Instead, this volume offers expanded and more inclusive meanings and values to archival scholarship, praxis, and pedagogy through the insightful essays written by Cox’s former students and colleagues. The essays, according to Bastian and Yakel, “seek to carry his vision of an archival discipline and the transformational power of scholarship forward. At the same time, push this vision into new, related directions” (ix). Indeed, this book pushes beyond the limits of archiving traditions that for many years have defined the discipline and how archivists understand why they do what they do.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.708

Abstract:
The purpose of this research is to measure the impact of data literacy on psychological empowerment in workplace for newly employed graduates. Since data play an increasingly important role in our lives, including the work environment, it incites research on whether data literacy skills, those related to collecting, processing, analyzing, and effectively communicating information retrieved from data models have a significant role in the psychological empowerment of alumni in the labor market. Statistical analysis methods were used to measure the correlation between indicators of data literacy and the psychological empowerment of alumni in their work. Competencies in using data models affect the self-efficacy of newly employed alumni at the workplace, mostly in terms of data-driven communication. The findings were discussed in the context of the increasing significance of the data librarian role as a possible method of supporting students and alumni via librarians who are now more involved in creating the educational outcomes of a given college or university.
Jasmine Clark
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.775

Abstract:
In Artificial Whiteness: Politics and Ideology in Artificial Intelligence, Yarden Katz encourages the reader to step away from discourse that frames Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a purely technological development. Instead, the reader is guided through AI’s epistemological roots, the espoused values and priorities of its progenitors, its sources of research funding, and the marriage among academia, industry, and the American military that birthed it. By providing this context, Katz is able to more thoroughly examine and interrogate AI’s principal service to structural white supremacy and imperialism, as well as how that service has been masked by a “progressive veneer” in recent years.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.755

Abstract:
This project sought to study how much academic librarians who work with open educational resources (OERs) know about accessibility, as well as how they incorporate accessibility into the products of their work. A survey was sent out through email list services in spring 2020, and any librarian worldwide who works with OERs was invited to participate; 193 responded in full. Just under half of librarians said they always consider accessibility when working with faculty to create or adapt OERs, but fewer than a third said they consider accessibility a factor when adding OERs to their collections.
, Rebecca Kelley
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.310

Abstract:
This exploratory study analyzed the specific crisis communication methods of academic libraries. A survey was sent to library staff at Association of Research Libraries member colleges and universities to describe if, who, when, and how they communicated bad news to their stakeholders for major, minor, and emerging crises. The findings show that respondents used multiple communication strategies, which varied based on the crisis. The data show that libraries communicated journal and database cancellations and health and safety emergencies more slowly than access issues and were more likely not to communicate those crises at all. Respondents also more frequently chose to communicate journal and database cancellations only when asked as compared to other crises. While access issues and health and safety emergencies were primarily communicated through social media and the library’s website, stakeholders received communication about journal and database cancellations primarily through targeted emails from library liaisons, face-to-face meetings with faculty, and the library’s website. These findings suggest that respondents communicated more quickly for minor crises but were more hesitant for crises that may have presented the potential for reputational harm. The varied responses between crisis types often conflicted with best practices for whether to deliver bad news and, if so, when and by whom. These findings indicate a need for academic libraries to develop comprehensive crisis communication plans that emphasize timeliness and transparency.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.7

Abstract:
During a four-year period, librarians collected student data by card-swiping undergraduate students who attended one of the core English composition class-based one-shot instruction sessions provided at a large state-supported doctoral-granting university. Data for students who attended library instruction was anonymized and compared to the same data points for students who were enrolled in the English class but did not attend library instruction. The authors compared student success indicators for the control and treatment groups (GPA, pass or fail status in course, and retention) and found a positive correlation between attending library instruction and student success.
Amy E.G. Barker, Ashley T. Hoffman
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.75

Abstract:
In this mixed-methods study, librarians at Kennesaw State University Library System conducted a year-long design research project to create a flexible subject guide “blueprint” for undergraduate students using LibGuides. Methods included a card sorting study with 18 undergraduate students and usability testing with 40 undergraduate students. The study’s goals were to identify what content, aesthetic design, organization, and structure students preferred on a subject guide. This paper addresses the current literature on research guides usability, overviews the design and implementation of the study, and highlights practical results that will easily be transferrable to other libraries.
Danya Leebaw
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.132

Abstract:
Christine Bombaro’s edited volume, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Action: Planning, Leadership, and Programming, is thoughtful, useful, and timely. Bombaro, associate director at the Dickinson College library, introduces this compilation by framing as a moral problem the gap between academic librarianship’s stated goals around diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) and its actual record. She argues that we must move beyond “merely trying our best” to actually “getting it right” (xii). Bombaro’s introduction and the first chapter serve to ground the book with historical and theoretical context around DEI in academic libraries and argue persuasively that we must move past dialogue to taking action. The chapters that follow offer case studies by academic library practitioners who describe actions taken in their institutions. Each chapter follows a similar structure, with literature reviews, case details, discussion, and careful footnoting. This book covers topics that include organizational goals and plans around DEI, developing cultural competencies for library staff, barriers to workforce diversity, and the development of models for how libraries can better serve the diverse communities with whom we work.
Debbie Rabina
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.133

Abstract:
One of the tenets of a book review is a discussion of how well the book meets the needs of its intended audience, and, as far as target audience goes, this book was written for me. I teach a foundations course in a school of information and it is the likes of me that need to adopt this as our textbook as the final step in the production-consumption cycle. And so, it is in light of my needs that I set out to examine Richard E. Rubin and Rachel G. Rubin’s Foundations of Library and Information Science. The two questions I asked myself throughout were: Do I agree with the authors on what the foundations of the field are, and does their treatment of topics satisfy my teaching needs?
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