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, Takeyuki Nakamura, Daichi Kato,
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e58009

Abstract:
Holorusia Loew, 1863 (Diptera: Tipulidae) is a relatively large crane fly genus with a wide distribution in the Afrotropic, Australasian–Oceanian, Eastern Palearctic, Oriental and Nearctic Regions. Although the genus is well known to include the largest crane fly species, the immature stages are, thus far, only described for the larva and pupa of the North American Holorusia hesperea Arnaud & Byers, 1990. In this study, we describe for the first time the egg, larva and pupae of the Japanese Holorusia mikado (Westwood, 1876). Larvae were collected from semi-aquatic habitats, from slow flowing areas of streams and small waterfalls where leaf litter accumulates; the larvae are detritivores and feed on wet, decomposing leaves. The larvae were reared to adults in the laboratory. Morphological characters of immature stages discussed with comparison with the North American H. hespera. Male and female genitalia are illustrated and described in detail for the first time.
Zuxian Zeng, Da Wang, Wanjuan Song, Hao Yu,
Published: 29 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e66260

Abstract:
The Clubiona zilla-group is a relatively small species group, distributed exclusively in East Asia, with only three species clearly documented so far. Clubiona hooda Dong & Zhang, 2016, which was previously placed in the C. trivialis-group, is assigned to the C. zilla-group in the present paper. A new spider of the C. zilla-group from Jiugong Mountain in China is described under the name of C. jiugong sp. nov. Detailed descriptions and photographs of the new species are provided.
, , Desmond Conlong, Norbert Delahaye, Elizabeth Grobbelaar, Laure Benoit, , Julien Haran
Published: 28 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64499

Abstract:
DNA barcoding has been succesfully used for bio-surveillance of forest and agricultural pests in temperate areas, but has few applications in the tropics and particulary in Africa. Cacosceles newmannii (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a Prioninae species that is locally causing extensive damage in commercially-grown sugarcane in the KwaZulu-Natal Province in South Africa. Due to the risk of spread of this species to the rest of southern Africa and to other sugarcane growing regions, clear and easy identification of this pest is critical for monitoring and for phytosanitary services. The genus Cacosceles Newman, 1838 includes four species, most being very similar in morphology. The damaging stage of the species is the larva, which is inherently difficult to distinguish morphologically from other Cerambycidae species. A tool for rapid and reliable identification of this species was needed by plant protection and quarantine agencies to monitor its potential abundance and spread. Here, we provide newly-generated barcodes for C. newmannii that can be used to reliably identify any life stage, even by non-trained taxonomists. In addition, we compiled a curated DNA barcoding reference library for 70 specimens of 20 named species of Afrotropical Prioninae to evaluate DNA barcoding as a valid tool to identify them. We also assessed the level of deeply conspecific mitochondrial lineages. Sequences were assigned to 42 different Barcode Index Numbers (BINs), 28 of which were new to BOLD. Out of the 20 named species barcoded, 11 (52.4%) had their own unique Barcode Index Number (BIN). Eight species (38.1%) showed multiple BINs with no morphological differentiation. Amongst them, C. newmannii showed two highly divergent genetic clusters which co-occur sympatrically, but further investigation is required to test whether they could represent new cryptic species.
Published: 27 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64115

Abstract:
Cousinia knorringiae Bornm. (Asteraceae) belongs to C. sect. Subappendiculatae Tscherneva, a group of the species-rich and taxonomically difficult genus Cousinia Cass. This species is narrowly distributed in the Western Tian-Shan and has been known as endemic to Kyrgyzstan. It inhabits bare rocks and screes at elevations of 1200–1500 m above sea level. This species is of conservation interest because of its small population size and limited distribution. Cousinia knorringiae is reported for the first time from eastern Uzbekistan on the basis of specimens collected on Ungur-Tepa Mt., a south-western outlier of the Bozbu-Too Mts. (Western Tian-Shan). The conservation status of the species is assessed as Endangered (EN), based on criterion D (estimated population size 200-250 mature individuals), according to the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria (version 3.1). A new distribution map and a line drawing for C. knorringiae are provided and its type locality is clarified. The new knowledge suggests that the species is endemic to the East Fergana botanical hotspot, which includes a transborder territory shared between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan and should, therefore, be subjected to international conservation measures. The southern extension of Ungur-Tepa Mt. harbours important plant species, which cannot be found elsewhere in Uzbekistan and may, therefore, be proposed for legal protection.
Published: 27 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63188

Abstract:
The lace bug genus Eritingis Drake and Ruhoff, 1962 is widely distributed in the Australian and Oriental Regions, whereas only a single species, E. recentis (Drake and Poor, 1937), has been recorded from the Oriental Region. To date, E. recentis is known to occur in Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Singapore and Vietnam, but has not been recorded from Japan and Thailand. Eritingis and E. recentis are recorded from Japan and Thailand for the first time.
Published: 26 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62878

Abstract:
Recent fieldwork by the author in Tenerife, mostly between 2014 and 2019, yielded new records of alien vascular plants. Fifteen taxa (Acacia decurrens, A. mearnsii, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Ensete ventricosum, Eucalyptus camaldulensis subsp. arida, E. cladocalyx, Euryops chrysanthemoides, Ficus elastica, Lippia alba, Pavonia sepioides, Pittosporum tobira, Populus × canadensis, Pyrostegia venusta, Ruellia dipteracanthus and Wigandia kunthii) are reported for the first time from the Canary Islands. All were initially introduced on purpose, mostly as ornamentals, and recently started to escape from cultivation. Most of them are ephemerals or only locally established, but nearly all have the potential to naturalise in the future. Thirteen additional species are reported for the first time from Tenerife: Atriplex nummularia, Bellis perennis, Chenopodium probstii, Coccoloba uvifera, Commelina benghalensis, Cuphea hyssopifolia, Eragrostis virescens, Lemna minuta, Malvastrum corchorifolium, Plerandra elegantissima, Psidium guajava, Thunbergia alata and Urochloa subquadripara. Finally, some miscellaneous notes are provided on the presence of Balanites aegyptiaca, Callistemon viminalis, Grevillea robusta and Passiflora caerulea in Tenerife.
, Panagiotis Damianidis, , , , , Wanda Plaitis, Dimitra Mavraki, Stamatina Nikolopoulou, Christos Arvanitidis
Published: 26 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e66420

Abstract:
Mediterranean ports are sources of significant economic activity and at the same time they act as recipients of considerable anthropogenic disturbance and pollution. Polluted and low-in-oxygen sediments can negatively impact benthic biodiversity and favour recruitment of opportunistic or invasive species. Macrobenthic communities are an important component of the port biota and can be used as environmental quality indicators. However, a baseline database for benthic biodiversity in Mediterranean ports has not yet been widely established. Macrobenthic assemblages were recorded in three Mediterranean touristic ports under the framework of the ENPI CBC MED project MAPMED (MAnagement of Port Areas in the MEDiterranean Sea Basin). Samples were collected from Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy), Heraklion (Crete, Greece) and El Kantaoui (Tunisia) ports during February, May and September 2012. The sampling stations were selected according to the different sectors within each port (i.e. leisure, fishing, passenger/cargo vessels and shipyard). A total of 277 taxa belonging to 12 phyla were found, of which the 96 taxa were present in all three ports. El Kantaoui port hosted the highest number of macrobenthic taxa. Mollusca were the most abundant group (34%) in all ports. The highest percentage of opportunistic taxa per station was found before the touristic period in the shipyard of Heraklion port (89.3%).
Haoran Sun, Liang Ding, , , Dong Zhang
Published: 23 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64558

Abstract:
The bat fly genus Ascodipteron Adensamer, 1896 currently contains 15 species, all of which occur in tropical and subtropical areas of the Eastern Hemisphere. A new species of endoparasitic bat fly, Ascodipteron sanmingensis sp. nov., was collected from the Great Himalayan Leaf-nosed Bat, Hipposideros armiger (Hodgson, 1853), during ecological studies on bats in Fujian, China. A new species, Ascodipteron sanmingensis sp. nov., is described, based on dealate neosomic females and is supported by molecular data from a 368 bp fragment of the cytochrome B (Cytb) gene. Habitus and diagnostic details, as well as the attachment sites on the host, are documented with photographs. A detailed comparison of the new species with related species is provided and the new species is accommodated in the most recent key to the world species of Ascodipteron.
, Jozef Lukáš, Martin Šlachta, , Peter Šima, Jan Erhart,
Published: 23 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e66112

Abstract:
Colletes hederae Schmidt & Westrich, 1993 is a cryptic bee species from the C. succinctus species-group. The previous occurrence and spreading of this species were predominantly in south-western Europe. To determine if the species was spreading in Slovak territory, Hedera helix was monitored from autumn 2015. The ivy-bee was first recorded in Slovakia during autumn 2017. This species is widespread inside and around Bratislava; however, it was not recorded under this study in any sites located eastwards. In the Czech Republic, it was not recorded in the south-east part of the country in 2017–2019. In 2020, the occurrence of this species was confirmed in many localities in the south of the country and strong populations were discovered, especially in the towns Znojmo and Mikulov. The populations likely originated from neighbouring Austria, where this species was discovered in 2006 and the localities are usually less than 100 km away from Czech and Slovak localities. A further survey could map a route of the northwards spread of this species.
Jia-Jia Chen, Hui Feng, Jian Yu, Wenwu Ye, Xiaobo Zheng
Published: 22 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e65227

Abstract:
Soybean (Glycine max) is a major source of edible oil and protein. A novel species of the genus Pythium, Pythium huanghuaiense, isolated from soybean seedlings in China, is described and illustrated on the basis of morphological characters and molecular evidence. Pythium huanghuaiense sp. nov. is closely related to species of the genus Pythium in clade F, as evidenced by the presence of hyphal swellings and its relatively rapid morphological growth. However, it differs by having relatively small sporangia and plerotic or nearly plerotic and thin-walled oospores. A pathogenicity test confirmed the newly-identified species as a pathogen of soybean.
Enrique González-Soriano, Felipe Noguera, , Santiago Zaragoza-Caballero, Leonardo González-Valencia
Published: 22 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e60980

Abstract:
A study on the patterns of richness, diversity and abundance of the Odonata from Santiago Dominguillo, Oaxaca is presented here. A total of 1601 specimens from six families, 26 genera and 50 species were obtained through monthly samplings of five days each. Libellulidae was the most diverse family (21 species), followed by Coenagrionidae (19), Gomphidae (4) and Calopterygidae (3). The Lestidae, Platystictidae and Aeshnidae families were the less diverse, with only one species each. Argia was the most speciose genus with 11 species, followed by Enallagma, Hetaerina, Erythrodiplax and Macrothemis with three species each and Phyllogomphoides, Brechmorhoga, Dythemis, Erythemis and Orthemis with two species each. The remaining 17 genera had one species each. Argia pipila Calvert, 1907 and Leptobasis vacillans Hagen in Selys, 1877 were recorded for the first time for the state of Oaxaca. We also analysed the temporal patterns of taxonomic and phylogenetic divergence for the Santiago Dominguillo Odonata assemblage: the Shannon diversity value throughout the year was 21.07 effective species, while the Simpson diversity was 13.17. In general, the monthly phylogenetic divergence was higher than expected for taxonomic distinctness, and lesser for average taxonomic distinctness. Monthly diversity, evenness and taxonomic divergence showed significant positive correlations (from moderate to strong) with monthly precipitation values. The analysis of our results, however, indicates that an increase in rainfall not only influences the temporal diversity of species, but also the identity of supraspecific taxa that constitute those temporal assemblages, i.e. there is an increase in temporal phylogenetic divergence.
Published: 21 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e65023

Abstract:
The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) is Australia’s national biodiversity database, delivering data and related services to more than 80,000 Australian and international users annually. Established under the Australian Government’s National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy to provide trusted biodiversity data to support the research sector, its utility now extends to government, higher education, non-government organisations and community groups. These partners provide data to the ALA and leverage its data and related services. The ALA has also played an important leadership role internationally in the biodiversity informatics and infrastructure space, both through its partnership with the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and through support for the international Living Atlases programmes which has now delivered 24 instances of ALA software to deliver sovereign biodiversity data capability around the world. This paper begins with a historical overview of the genesis of the ALA from the collections, museums and herbaria community in Australia. It details the biodiversity and related data and services delivered to users with a primary focus on species occurrence records which represent the ALA's primary data type. Finally, the paper explores the ALA's future directions by referencing results from a recently completed national consultation process.
Domingos Sandramo, , Silvio Cianciullo, Bernardo Muatinte, Almeida Guissamulo
Published: 21 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64461

Abstract:
The collections of the Natural History Museum of Maputo have a crucial role in the safeguarding of Mozambique's biodiversity, representing an important repository of data and materials regarding the natural heritage of the country. In this paper, a dataset is described, based on the Museum’s Entomological Collection recording 409 species belonging to seven orders and 48 families. Each specimen’s available data, such as geographical coordinates and taxonomic information, have been digitised to build the dataset. The specimens included in the dataset were obtained between 1914–2018 by collectors and researchers from the Natural History Museum of Maputo (once known as “Museu Alváro de Castro”) in all the country’s provinces, with the exception of Cabo Delgado Province. This paper adds data to the Biodiversity Network of Mozambique and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility, within the objectives of the SECOSUD II Project and the Biodiversity Information for Development Programme. The aforementioned insect dataset is available on the GBIF Engine data portal (https://doi.org/10.15468/j8ikhb). Data were also shared on the Mozambican national portal of biodiversity data BioNoMo (https://bionomo.openscidata.org), developed by SECOSUD II Project.
, Rusko Petrov, Yana Andonova, Ivaylo Klisurov, Andrew Dixon
Published: 20 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63729

Abstract:
Considered extinct as breeding species in the early 2000s, the Saker Falcon was recovered when the first active nest from the new history of the species in Bulgaria was discovered in 2018, formed of two birds that were re-introduced back in 2015. Currently, there is only one confirmed wild breeding pair in the country - the male from 2015 with a female changed in 2020, released again as a part of the programme, in 2016. This is a report on the preliminary results and analysis of the ongoing establishment phase of the re-introduction of the Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) in Bulgaria - first ever performed for this species in the country and globally. The period studied is 2015-2020. Following the re-introduction activities started in 2011, the current phase is defined by standardised methodology and a unified approach. Analysed and presented are methods for captive breeding and hacking, the breeding performance of the falcons, the number of released individuals, data from the post-fledging dependence period and a model of population growth.
, , Zhiyu Jia, Feng Guo, Xiaolei Wang, Wei Wang, , Dingyong Huang,
Published: 19 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62395

Abstract:
Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence data have played a significant role in phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of scleractinian corals. In this study, the complete mitogenome of Psammocora profundacella Gardiner, 1898, collected from Guangdong Province, China, was sequenced by next-generation sequencing for the first time. Psammocora profundacella is the first species for which a mitogenome has been sequenced in the family Psammocoridae. The length of its assembled mitogenome sequence was 16,274 bp, including 13 protein-coding genes, two tRNAs and two rRNAs. Its gene content and gene order were consistent with the other Scleractinia species. All genes were encoded on the H strand and the GC content of the mitochondrial genome was 30.49%. Gene content and order were consistent with the other Scleractinia species. Based on 13 protein-coding genes, Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic analysis showed that P. profundacella belongs to the “Robust” clade. Mitochondrial genome data provide important molecular information for understanding the phylogeny of stony corals. More variable markers and additional species should be sequenced to confirm the evolutionary relationships of Scleractinia in the future.
, , Rafał Kowalczyk
Published: 19 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63747

Abstract:
Despite the widespread belief that an extensive body of knowledge exists for the sucking lice (Anoplura), some of their common, Eurasian or even cosmopolitan species still lack complete taxonomic descriptions, especially those for their nymphal stages. This applies especially to the most common rodent parasites: the lice of the genus Hoplopleura. In Europe, only two of the five most common Hoplopleura species have full taxonomic characteristics with a description of the nymphal stages. This study enriches the current state of knowledge for another species, Hoplopleura longula and presents the first description of its nymphal stages. The study includes five rare louse specimens (two nymphs I, one nymph II, two nymphs III) of H. longula collected from 63 Eurasian harvest mice Micromys minutus. The collected lice were fixed and preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol solution and then placed in polyvinyl-lactophenol to form total preparations. Only two of the five species found in Eurasia (H. acanthopus, H. affinis, H. captiosa, H. edentula and H. longula) have been given full taxonomic descriptions, including immature stages. This paper presents a description of the nymphal stages of H. longula (described for the first time).
, Ignacio Moreu, Edgar Rosas Alquicira, , , Andrea Botelho, , Ana Costa, Raul Neto, José Azevedo, et al.
Published: 16 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64969

Abstract:
The macroalgal flora of the Island of São Miguel (eastern group of the Azores Archipelago) has attracted the interest of many researchers in the past, the first publications going back to the nineteenth century. Initial studies were mainly taxonomic, resulting in the publication of a checklist of the Azorean benthic marine algae. Later, the establishment of the University of the Azores on the Island permitted the logistic conditions to develop both temporal studies and long-term research and this resulted in a significant increase on research directed at the benthic marine algae and littoral communities of the Island and consequent publications. Prior to the present paper, the known macroalgal flora of São Miguel Island comprised around 260 species. Despite this richness, a significant amount of the research was never made public, notably Masters and PhD theses encompassing information regarding presence data recorded at littoral and sublittoral levels down to a depth of approximately 40 m around the Island and the many collections made, which resulted in vouchers deposited in the AZB Herbarium Ruy Telles Palhinha and the LSM- Molecular Systematics Laboratory at the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of the University of the Azores. The present publication lists the macroalgal taxonomic records, together with information on their ecology and occurrence around São Miguel Island, improving the knowledge of the Azorean macroalgal flora at local and regional scales. A total of 12,781 specimens (including some identified only to genus) belonging to 431 taxa of macroalgae are registered, comprising 284 Rhodophyta, 59 Chlorophyta and 88 Ochrophyta (Phaeophyceae). Of these, 323 were identified to species level (212 Rhodophyta, 48 Chlorophyta and 63 Ochrophyta), of which 61 are new records for the Island (42 Rhodophyta, 9 Chlorophyta and 10 Ochrophyta), one an Azorean endemic (Predaea feldmannii subsp. azorica Gabriel), five are Macaronesian endemisms (the red algae Botryocladia macaronesica Afonso-Carrillo, Sobrino, Tittley & Neto, Laurencia viridis Gil-Rodríguez & Haroun, Millerella tinerfensis (Seoane-Camba) S.M.Boo & J.M.Rico, Phyllophora gelidioides P.Crouan & H.Crouan ex Karsakoff and the green alga Codium elisabethiae O.C.Schmidt), 19 are introduced species (15 Rhodophyta, two Chlorophyta and two Ochrophyta) and 32 are of uncertain status (21 Rhodophyta, five Chlorophyta and six Ochrophyta).
, , , , Cândida Ramos, , Fernando Pereira, Jagoba Malumbres-Olarte, Alejandra Ros-Prieto, Mário Boieiro, et al.
Published: 16 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62886

Abstract:
The sharp increase in tourist visitation of the Azores Archipelago from 2015 onwards raised concerns about the impacts of recreational tourism on native habitats. In response, a project was financed by the Azorean Government to investigate the drivers of biodiversity erosion associated with recreational tourism. Here, we present the data on spider biodiversity found on trails located within the native Azorean forests as they are home to several endemic species of great conservation value. We applied an optimised and standardised sampling protocol (COBRA) in twenty-three plots located in five trails on Terceira and São Miguel Islands and assessed diversity and abundance of spider species at different distances from the trail head and the trail itself. Of the 45 species (12435 specimens) collected, 13 were endemic to the Azores (9690 specimens), 10 native non-endemic (2047 specimens) and 22 introduced (698 specimens). This database will be the baseline of a long-term monitoring project for the assessment of touristic impacts on native forest trails. This methodology can also be used on other habitats and biogeograhical regions.
Anotai Suklom, Patchara Danaisawadi,
Published: 8 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63197

Abstract:
The genus Floresorchestia Bousfield, 1984 is widely distributed in terrestrial and marine coastal habitats. It has been found from coastal South Africa through to the Indo-Pacific region and the Caribbean Sea in Central America. Two species of Floresorchestia have been reported in Thailand, Floresorchestia boonyanusithii Wongkamhaeng et al. 2016 and Floresorchestia buraphana Wongkamhaeng et al. 2016. This work reports on a new species of Floresorchestia found at Kasetsart University in a man-made pond and neighbouring areas. Classification of the new species was achieved by considering the left mandible 5-dentate; gnathopod 2 posterior margin merus carpus and propodus of gnathopod 2 covered in palmate setae, palm reaching about 33% along posterior margin; uropod 3 peduncle with three robust setae; telson dorsal mid-line half the length of its breadth and four robust setae per lobe.
, Dong Sun, Peng Tian, Dinyong Huang, ,
Published: 8 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62343

Abstract:
Endeis straughani Clark, 1970 was originally described from Queensland, Australia. Its range was extended to Ghana, West Africa when E. picta Bamber, 1979 was synonymised with E. straughani by Staples (1982). The current paper extends this range further, to include Port Louis, Mauritius. Five immature individuals gathered amongst hydroids during the 5th leg of the DY125-34 expedition were tentatively identified as E. straughani juveniles. Since these were collected from the fouling community on the ship’s hull, they probably originated in Port Louis (Mauritius) when the ship was docked there.
, , Simon Vitecek, Steffen Pauls, Felicitas Erzinger, Agim Gashi, Linda Grapci Kotori, Donard Geci, Milaim Musliu, Edison Kasumaj
Published: 7 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64486

Abstract:
The Western Balkans are an important hotspot of caddisfly diversity in Europe, with several microscale endemics, many of which were discovered during the recent years. The genus Potamophylax Wallengren, 1891 likely originated and diversified in Europe, with the Balkan Peninsula being one of the most important diversity hotspots. In this paper, we describe the new species Potamophylax coronavirus sp. n. from Bjeshkët e Nemuna National Park in the Republic of Kosovo. The new species belongs to the Potamophylax winneguthi species group and is morphologically most similar to Potamophylax juliani Kumanski, 1999, currently known only from Bulgaria and Potamophylax winneguthi Klapalek, 1902, known from Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia. The male of the new species differs from its most similar congeners mainly in exhibiting: (1) elongated subrectangular superior appendages in lateral view; (2) hardly acuminate, almost rounded apex of intermediate appendages; (3) differently shaped, irregular and higher inferior appendages; (4) narrow spinate area, roughly rectangular in dorsal view, slightly wider at the base and (5) different paramere shape and/or spine pattern. The new species also differs by its considerably smaller size and association with open, high altitude eucrenal zones. The uncorrected interspecific pairwise distance between P. coronavirus and other species of the P. winneguthi species group is on par with those amongst other recognised species in the group, as well as with the yet ambiguously identified taxa from the Sharr, Rila and Bajgorë Mountains. The new species is most probably a microendemic of Bjeshkët e Nemuna, thus highlighting further this area as an important hotspot of caddisfly biodiversity in Europe.
, Laurynas Taura
Published: 6 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e65674

Abstract:
A previously unrecorded native species, Scirpus radicans (Cyperaceae), was discovered in the southern part of Lithuania in 2020. Although this species has a large distribution area in other parts of Eurasia, it is currently recognised as threatened in many European countries. Recordings of S. radicans in Lithuania had been expected, as these plants do occur or have been reported to occur in neighbouring regions. The aim of this study was to analyse the distribution of S. radicans in southern Lithuania, to determine the occupied areas and the size of populations, to study their capacity of vegetative reproduction, their habitats and associated plant communities, as well as to perform an assessment of the species' conservation status within the country. We studied S. radicans populations at two sites on the shores of Lake Pabezninkai and of Lake Netečius in the Varėna District (southern Lithuania), from August to October 2020. A total of 993 individuals of S. radicans were counted and their stands comprised 0.73 ha. The density of individuals in the studied plots ranged from 0.02 to 0.78 plants/m2. Only 0.5% of individuals at Lake Pabezninkai and 20.7% of individuals at Lake Netečius were at the stage of generative reproduction. Individuals at the stage of vegetative reproduction comprised 56.4%, whereas generative individuals amounted to 1.7% of all studied plants. One to seven stolons developed per plant and the mean number of rosettes per stolon was 2.8 ± 1.2. Potentially, a total of ca. 2860 rosettes could be expected from all individuals of the studied plots, but the actual realised rate of vegetative reproduction is unknown. A more detailed study of the reproductive capacities of S. radicans would be required for better understanding the causes of the lately observed decrease of this species in most of the countries of Central Europe. Our analysis of the associated plant communities has enabled us to confirm the presence of a Scirpetus radicantis Nowiński 1930 association previously not recorded in Lithuania. By assessing S. radicans in accordance with the IUCN Criteria, we conclude that this species should be classified as endangered (EN) in Lithuania. Based on this assessment, we propose to include this species on the list of legally protected species of Lithuania. Conservation of shallow lakes with sandy or muddy shores and with significant natural fluctuations of the water level is the main measure for ensuring the survival of S. radicans, as well as other rare and endangered species adapted to such a type of habitat.
, Ksenia Klimova, Daniil Bakalin,
Published: 1 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e65199

Abstract:
The liverwort flora of Ayan was first investigated one hundred and fifty years after the first exploration of vascular plants. A number of factors has determined the relatively high taxonomic diversity of liverworts in this hemiarctic flora of small-sized area: 118 species and one subspecies were revealed. These data are new not only for the studied area, but also for the huge land adjacent to the western coast of the Sea of Okhotsk. The liverwort flora possesses the domination of taxa common in the hemiarctic, although with a lot of taxa more common in boreal as well as arctic-alpine environments. The presence of Mega-Beringian and calciphilous taxa is the peculiar trait of the studied liverwort flora. Based on detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), Ayan liverwort flora shows relationships to the continental mainland floras situated both in North-East Asian hemiarctic and hemiboreal East Asia and is, therefore, the link between both. The flora of Ayan surroundings is one of the newly-filled ‘blank spots’ in the possible floral exchange way between Arctic Northeast Asia and mountainous floras of temperate East Asia.
, Anthony Maldonado-Castro, José Sustache, Omar Monsegur-Rivera
Published: 1 April 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64654

Abstract:
Varronia bellonis (Urb.) Britton is a lianescent or recumbent shrub that is endemic to Puerto Rico where it is restricted to specific geology types with a limited extent on the western half of the Island. The species occurs on serpentinite geology covered by serpentine-derived soils in the west-central mountains and on limestone geology in the the northern karst region. The species area of occupancy is estimated to range between 108 km2 and 268 km2 and its extent of occurrence to be between 644 km2 and 852 km2. The number of locations are estimated to be four. There are 418 known mature individuals in the wild (Hamilton 2020a). The species was previously assessed as Critically Endangered (Linsky and Sustache 2014), based on available information. However, an international team have been collaborating to conserve the species and, based on new information derived from this work, the species is reassessed as Endangered (EN), based on Criteria B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v), according to the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria (version 3.1) and guidelines (IUCN Standards and Petitions Committee 2019). Areas of suitable habitat across the native range of the threatened plant, V. bellonis, were surveyed by a team of experts between 2016 and 2019 to determine the species habitat preferences, identify threats to the species survival and provide an up-to-date meta-population status. The new information enabled members of the international team to reassess the species status and will enable sound and scientifically-based recovery actions to be recommended that can secure Varronia bellonis populations for the future. Parallel efforts are ongoing to explore the species population genetics and reproductive biology.
, Jamal Ahmed, Aiman Naveed, Arooj Batool, Aqsa Shahzad, Razia Bibi, Anum Sajjad
Published: 31 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e61541

Abstract:
This study was conducted to see whether herpetofaunal assemblage differed amongst hiking trails, undisturbed forest and urban areas within the Margalla Hills National Park, Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan. Circular plot area-constrained searches (45 plots in each habitat, each plot with an area of 25 m2) were used from March 2018 to July 2019. We recorded seven amphibian species, nine lizard species and six snake species. The species richness of amphibians and lizards was the same in the studied strata, while the detection and encounter rate of snakes was lower in the undisturbed forest and urban areas. The encounter rate of amphibians differed significantly between urban areas and hiking trails/undisturbed forest. The encounter rate and population density of lizards differed significantly between undisturbed forest and urban areas. The most frequently encountered amphibian species along the hiking trail and urban areas was Duttaphrynus stomaticus, with Hoplobatrachus tigerinus in undisturbed forest. The most common and frequently encountered lizard species along the hiking trail and urban areas was Hemidactylus brookii, while the Ophisops jerdonii was the most frequently seen in undisturbed forest. The most common and frequently encountered snake species along the hiking trail and undisturbed forest was the Indotyphlops braminus, while Ptyas mucosa was the most common in urban areas. The subsequent bio-assessment, based on herpetofauna, of the Park revealed good to excellent biotic integrity The Park faces threats including livestock grazing, alien invasive vegetation and human disturbance due to settlements, restaurants and tourism-related activities. While several of these threats have been mitigated since the establishment of the Islamabad Wildlife Management Board, the Park still requires improved management, especially regarding regulating tourism.
, Hans Beeckman, Tom De Mil, Cecile De Troyer, Victor Deklerck, Henry Engledow, Wannes Hubau, Piet Stoffelen,
Published: 31 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62329

Abstract:
The current data paper aims to interlink the African plant collections of the Meise Botanic Garden Herbarium (BR) and the Royal Museum for Central Africa Xylarium (Tw). Complementing both collections strengthens the reference value of each institutional collection, as more complete metadata are made available and it enables increased quality control for the identification of wood specimens. Furthermore, the renewed connection enables the linking of available wood trait data with data on phenology, leaf morphology or even molecular information for many tree species, allowing assessments of performance of individual trees. In addition to studies at the interspecific level, comparisons at the intraspecific level become possible, which could lead to important new insights into resilience to and impact of global change, as well as biodiversity conservation or forest management of Central African forest ecosystems. By interlinking the Tervuren Xylarium Wood database with the recently digitised herbarium of Meise Botanic Garden, we were able to establish a link between 6,621 xylarium and 9,641 herbarium records for 6,953 plant specimens. Both institutional databases were complemented with reliable specimen metadata. The Tervuren xylarium now profits from taxonomic revisions made by botanists at Meise Botanic Garden and a list of phenotypical features for woody African species can be extended with wood anatomical descriptors. New metadata from the Tw xylarium records were used to add the country of collection to 50 linked BR herbarium specimens for which this information was missing. Furthermore, metadata available from the labels on digitised BR herbarium specimens was used to update Tw xylarium records with the date of collection (817 records), collection locality (698 records), coordinates (482 records) and altitude (817 records). In conclusion, we created a reference database with reliable botanic identities which can be used in a range of studies, such as modelling analyses, community assessments or trait analyses, all framed in a spatiotemporal context. Furthermore, the linked collections hold historical reference data and specimens that can be studied in the context of global changes.
Lakmali Dissanayake, Nalin Wijayawardene, Monika Dayarathne, Milan Samarakoon, Dong-Qin Dai, Kevin Hyde,
Published: 26 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63864

Abstract:
In this study, we introduce a novel genus, Paraeutypella, of the family Diatrypaceae comprising three species viz. Paraeutypella guizhouensis sp. nov. and P. citricola (basionym: Eutypella citricola) and P. vitis (basionym: Sphaeria vitis). Diatrypella longiasca sp. nov. is also introduced, which forms a distinct clade in Diatrypella sensu stricto. The discovery of this new genus will contribute to expanding the knowledge and taxonomic framework of Diatrypaceae (Xylariales). Generic delimitations in Diatrypaceae are unsettled because the phylogeny has yet to be resolved using extensive taxon sampling and sequencing of ex-type cultures. During an investigation of xylarialean fungi, we collected eutypella-like fungi which is distinct from Eutypella sensu stricto in our phylogenetic analyses (ITS and β-tubulin), thus, introduced as Paraeutypella guizhouensis gen. et sp. nov.. Paraeutypella is characterised by having 4–25 perithecia in a stroma each with 3–6 sulcate, long ostiolar necks. Paraeutypella citricola comb. nov. (basionym: Eutypella citricola) is introduced on Acer sp. from China. Diatrypella longiasca sp. nov. is introduced as a new species in Diatrypella sensu stricto. which has 2–5 ascomata per stroma and long ascospores, unusual when compared to other Diatrypella species and distinct phylogenetically.
, Manuela Parente, , Ana Costa, Andrea Botelho, Enric Ballesteros, Sandra Monteiro, Roberto Resendes, Pedro Afonso, Afonso Prestes, et al.
Published: 25 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e61909

Abstract:
The algal flora of the Island of Santa Maria (eastern group of the Azores archipelago) has attracted interest of researchers on past occasions (Drouët 1866, Agardh 1870, Trelease 1897, Schmidt 1931, Ardré et al. 1974, Fralick and Hehre 1990, Neto et al. 1991, Morton and Britton 2000, Amen et al. 2005, Wallenstein and Neto 2006, Tittley et al. 2009, Wallenstein et al. 2009a, Wallenstein et al. 2010, Botelho et al. 2010, Torres et al. 2010, León-Cisneros et al. 2011, Martins et al. 2014, Micael et al. 2014, Rebelo et al. 2014, Ávila et al. 2015, Ávila et al. 2016, Machín-Sánchez et al. 2016, Uchman et al. 2016, Johnson et al. 2017, Parente et al. 2018). Nevertheless, the Island macroalgal flora is not well-known as published information reflects limited collections obtained in short-term visits by scientists. To overcome this, a thorough investigation, encompassing collections and presence data recording, was undertaken at both the littoral and sublittoral levels down to a depth of approximately 40 m, covering an area of approximately 64 km2. The resultant taxonomic records are listed in the present paper which also provides information on species ecology and occurrence around the Island, improving, thereby, the knowledge of the Azorean macroalgal flora at both local and regional scales. A total of 2329 specimens (including some taxa identified only to genus level) belonging to 261 taxa of macroalgae are registered, comprising 152 Rhodophyta, 43 Chlorophyta and 66 Ochrophyta (Phaeophyceae). Of these, 174 were identified to species level (102 Rhodophyta, 29 Chlorophyta and 43 Ochrophyta), encompassing 52 new records for the Island (30 Rhodophyta, 9 Chlorophyta and 13 Ochrophyta), 2 Macaronesian endemics (Laurencia viridis Gil-Rodríguez & Haroun; and Millerella tinerfensis (Seoane-Camba) S.M.Boo & J.M.Rico), 10 introduced (the Rhodophyta Acrothamnion preissii (Sonder) E.M.Wollaston, Antithamnion hubbsii E.Y.Dawson, Asparagopsis armata Harvey, Bonnemaisonia hamifera Hariot, Melanothamnus harveyi (Bailey) Díaz-Tapia & Maggs, Scinaia acuta M.J.Wynne and Symphyocladia marchantioides (Harvey) Falkenberg; the Chlorophyta Codium fragile subsp. fragile (Suringar) Hariot; and the Ochrophyta Hydroclathrus tilesii (Endlicher) Santiañez & M.J.Wynne, and Papenfussiella kuromo (Yendo) Inagaki) and 18 species of uncertain status (11 Rhodophyta, 3 Chlorophyta and 4 Ochrophyta).
Published: 25 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63830

Abstract:
Based on a recent field survey in Iraqi Kurdistan and a critical evaluation of previously published data, 37 mayfly species are listed as occurring in Iraq. We collected and identified nine species as new for the country and corrected some previously published records. For several species scarcely treated in the literature, we provide information allowing their identification in the larval stage to promote the acquisition of reliable faunistic data from Iraq in the future.
Jie Yang, Xuexiong Wang, Kevin Duffy,
Published: 25 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62839

Abstract:
Compared to the leaf-miners and stem-miners on flowering plants, the miners on ferns (including both Lycopodiophyta and Polypodiophyta in the broad sense) are less known. Knowledge of miners and their host plants is essential to fully understand plant-insect interactions. Although there are many scattered records on fern miners, a worldwide checklist has not been reported. We provide a preliminary checklist of fern-mining insects and their host plants worldwide. Altogether, we found records for 128 species and 18 families of fern miners, mainly that feed on Dennstaedtiaceae, Equisetaceae, Polypodiaceae and Aspleniaceae. Fern miners belonged to four orders: Diptera (51 species; 39.8%), Coleoptera (33 species; 25.8%), Lepidoptera (28 species; 21.9%) and Hymenoptera (16 species; 12.5%). They are primarily known from the Palaearctic Region, Nearctic Region, Neotropical Region and Oriental Region.
Published: 22 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e64212

Abstract:
This study systematically catalogues all known taxa of the family Stratiomyidae in Egypt and Saudi Arabia. It is one in a series of planned studies aiming to catalogue the whole order in both countries. Twenty species, belonging to seven genera and three subfamilies (Pachygastrinae, Stratiomyinae and Nemotelinae), are treated. One of these genera, Oplodontha and two species, Oplodontha pulchriceps Loew and Oxycera turcica Üstüner & Hasbenli, are recorded herein for the first time from Saudi Arabia. A lectotype for Nemotelus matrouhensis Mohammad et al., 2009 is designated. An updated classification, synonymies, type localities, world and local distributions, dates of collection and some coloured photographs are provided.
Published: 17 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63290

Abstract:
Testate amoebae are a polyphyletic group of protists living preferentially in soils, freshwaters and wetlands. These Protozoa have a worldwide distribution, but their presence and diversity in the Azores (a remote oceanic archipelago) is poorly known, with only twelve taxa recorded so far. The published information reflects occasional collections from sporadic field visits from naturalists to São Miguel Island, mainly in the nineteenth century. To overcome this limitation, a standardised survey was carried out on the Island, sampling different types of habitats from several localities to provide the distribution and information on species ecology of testate amoebae. In this study, 43 species of testate amoebae were recorded (within a total of 499 occurrences), belonging to two orders of Protista (26 Arcellinida and 17 Euglyphida). The most frequently occurring testate amoebae were Euglypha strigosa, Trinema lineare, Euglypha rotunda, Assulina muscorum and Cyclopyxis eurystoma. The most diverse genus was Euglypha (six species). A total of 38 species are new records for the Azores Archipelago. These data help to improve knowledge of the geographical distribution of testate amoebae in the northern hemisphere and their diversity in the Azores Archipelago.
Fei Wu, Wenquan Zhen, Zening Yang,
Published: 16 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63253

Abstract:
During the investigation of forest insects in Guilin, Guangxi, encyrtid parasitoid wasps belonging to the genus Psyllaephagus were reared from Macrohomotoma sinica (Hemiptera: Homotomidae) feeding on Ficus concinna. A new species of Psyllaephagus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), P. guangxiensis Zu sp. nov., is described from Guangxi, China as a parasitoid of Macrohomotoma sinica Yang & Li (Hemiptera: Homotomidae) on Ficus concinna (Miq.) Miq. (Urticales: Moraceae).
Published: 15 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62809

Abstract:
Hybridization is an evolutionary event present in the natural world. Several studies suggest that natural hybridization is an important process in plant evolution, creating new genetic combinations which can play a vital role in speciation (Soltis and Soltis 2009, Soltis 2013, Neri et al. 2017, Taylor and Larson 2019). Therefore, it is important to understand and protect naturally occurring hybrids, conserving their ecological novelties and new traits, such as the ability to explore new niches, different from those of the parental species (Soltis 2013, Supple and Shapiro 2018). The British Virgin Islands (BVI) is a UK Overseas Territory situated in the Caribbean biodiversity hotspot (Myers et al. 2000). To date, three natural hybrids are known to occur within this territory: Tillandsia × lineatispica Mez, Anthurium × selloanum K.Koch and Coccoloba krugii × C. uvifera R.A.Howard (Howard 1957, Acevedo-Rodriguez and Strong 2005, Acevedo-Rodriguez and Strong 2012). Tillandsia × lineatispica is endemic to the Puerto Rican Bank, occurring in Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands (USVI) and the British Virgin Islands with an extent of occurrence estimated to be 3,390 km2 and a limited number of locations. The suitable habitat for this hybrid is declining mainly due to the negative impacts of feral ungulates, development for tourism and residential infrastructure and the impact of human-induced wildfires. In addition, it is suspected that the global population does not exceed 10,000 individuals with the largest subpopulation on Beef Island in the BVI thought to have no more than 1,000 mature individuals. This hybrid is therefore evaluated as Vulnerable, based on IUCN Red List Criteria, B1a(iii)+2b(iii) + C2a(i). Anthurium × selloanum is an endemic hybrid to BVI and USVI with a very restricted extent of occurrence which was estimated to range between 103 km2 and 207 km2 and an area of occupancy which was estimated to range between 56 km2 and 188 km2 and a limited number of locations. The suitable habitat of this species is declining mainly due to the negative impacts of feral ungulates, development for tourism and residential infrastructure and the negative impact of recreation activities in protected areas. This species is therefore evaluated as Endangered, based on IUCN Red List Criteria B1a+ b(iii) + B2a+b(iii). Coccoloba krugii × C. uvifera is native to the BVI, USVI, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Haiti and Anguilla. It is estimated to have an extent of occurrence of 89,412 km2. This value exceeds the threshold for any threatened category. Despite an observed continuing decline of suitable habitat for this species, which is being degraded mainly through ongoing development pressures, this species occurs in more than 10 locations. It is therefore assessed as Least Concern (LC). In this paper, we discuss the conservation status of all the known, naturally occurring, native hybrids in the the British Virgin Islands and we provide distribution data, including new records, from across these hybrid species ranges. Although conservation assessments of hybrids are out of the scope of the published IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (IUCN Standards and Petitions Committee 2019), we use the IUCN Red List Criteria and Categories (version 3.1) to establish an equivalent conservation status of these hybrids and discuss conservation action due to the potential evolutionary importance of these naturally occurring hybrids. These assessments provide the necessary baseline information for prioritising species conservation and making informed management decisions, such as establishing the BVI's Tropical Important Plant Areas (TIPAS) network (Sanchez et al. 2019).
Antar Pérez-Botello,
Published: 15 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63372

Abstract:
Within tropical shallow-water coral reefs, marine sponges provide microhabitats for a wide range of fauna. Although there have been numerous studies and reports of symbiotic relationships amongst sponges and their associated fauna, those pieces of information are isolated and disconnected. For this reason, based on the available literature, we compiled a species-interaction dataset of coral reef marine sponge-associated fauna known to date. We introduce a dataset that includes 67 literature items that report 101 species of sponge hosts clustered in 12 Orders having a host/guest interaction with 284 guest species from six Phyla present in the Northwestern Tropical Atlantic coral reefs. This dataset consists of two types of information: 1. Machine-readable data and 2. Human-readable data. These two types of coding improve the scope of the dataset and facilitate the link between machine platforms and human-friendly displays. We also created an interactive visualisation of the species-interactions dataset and of a dynamic Chord Diagram of the host-guest species connections to generate a user-friendly link between the user and the dataset.
, José Azevedo,
Published: 11 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62813

Abstract:
Several lists of marine fish from Azores have been published in the past. Most of those publications are difficult to access on line and several were not published in peer-reviewed journals. This checklist updates all the chondrichthyan records for the Azores Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), according to the most recent taxonomic classification of cartilaginous fish, as well as providing information on the conservation status for all species. We also present recent literature data on rare species and recent records for Azores. This is the first comprehensive list of cartilaginous fishes from Azores to be published in the GBIF database.
Published: 11 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62812

Abstract:
Since the first published comprehensive checklist of Azorean fishes - covering the whole Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) region - several new records have been published and an updated checklist published in 2010. This new dataset covers all confirmed species of actinopterygians for the Azorean EEZ. In this update, we made corrections to the previous checklists, updated the taxonomy according to the most recent bibliography and added two new species to the Azorean Actinopterygii checklist.
Published: 10 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62242

Abstract:
Stoneflies (Plecoptera) are often associated with inhabiting cold perennial streams, but many species also inhabit intermittent streams that experience reduced or lack of flow during summer and autumn. In this study, the influence of stream permanence on stonefly assemblage composition and spatial distribution at Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, USA, was addressed, based on a 14 month sampling regime from the fullest range of stream sizes and habitable flow regions available. Adult stoneflies were collected monthly from 43 sites at the Park plus an additional two sites at the near-adjacent Western Kentucky University Green River Preserve. Collections were done from December 2018–November 2019 using a standard timed protocol with beating sheets for adults and once in December 2019–January 2020 for larvae. Stream sites were assigned one of five category types: perennial spring runs, perennial spring seeps, upland perennial streams, perennial riverine and summer dry runs. In total, 34 species were collected. The most prominent difference in stonefly community structure was between spring runs, spring seeps and summer dry streams vs. upland perennial streams. Approximately 88% of species collected had univoltine-fast life cycles and 79% likely had an extended period of egg or larval diapause. Due to the predominance of small upland perennial and summer dry streams, species commonly typically found in larger lotic systems are fundamentally filtered out of the region due to the lack of available habitats. Species able to survive in intermittent habitats do so by life history adaptations including to survive desiccation as larvae or eggs.
, Anandhan Rameshkumar
Published: 10 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e59487

Abstract:
Taxonomy and diversity of Evaniidae from India have not been studied in depth and hosts of many species are unknown. Out of 31 world genera, only five genera (Evania Fab., Prosevania Kieffer, Szepligetella Bradley, Vernevania Huben & Deans and Zeuxevania Kieffer) are reported from India. Based on the collection deposited in the Hymenoptera section of Zoological Survey of India (National Zoological Collection), here we are describing a new species of the genus Zeuxevania. A new evaniid species Zeuxevania hubeni sp. nov. is described, based on a female specimen collected from Kadaludi Bird Sanctuary, Kerala, India. The new species is compared with Z. curvicarinata (Cameron), as well as Z. kasauliensis (Muzaffer) and a key to Indian species, based on females, is provided. The type specimen is deposited in the National Zoological Collection, Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata, India.
José Marcelino, , Isabel Borges, Enésima Pereira, Vasco Santos, António Soares
Published: 10 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62157

Abstract:
In this paper, we present an extensive checklist of selected arthropods and their distribution in five Islands of the Azores (Santa Maria. São Miguel, Terceira, Flores and Pico). Habitat surveys included five herbaceous and four arboreal habitat types, scaling up from native to anthropogenic managed habitats. We aimed to contribute to the ongoing effort to document the terrestrial biodiversity of the world, in particular the Portuguese archipelago of the Azores, as islands harbour a significant portion of unique terrestrial biodiversity. Selection of Arthropoda groups for the current checklist was based on their known richness and abundance (Arachnida, Collembola, Hemiptera, Neuroptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera), in almost all terrestrial ecosystems, as well as their importance in current Integrated Pest Management and alternative Biocontrol protocols at large (i.e. hymenopteran parasitoids and beneficial Coleoptera). In addition, we include the list of Dermaptera, Orthoptera, Psocoptera and Thysanoptera species. These assembled groups represent part of the monitoring programme EDEN Azores (2008-2014), where all Arthropod fauna, at all strata, within nine representative habitats of the abovementioned five Islands of the Azores was recorded. In this study, a total of 116,523 specimens, belonging to 483 species and subspecies of selected groups of arthropods, are reported by order, family and, when possible, genus and species. Hymenopteran, mostly parasitoids, accounted for the most represented taxa across all the monitoring and sampling phase of EDEN Azores (193 species and mophospecies), followed by Coleoptera (95 species); Collembola (89 species); and Araneae (72 species). A total of 37 non-native species are reported for the first time in the Azores. Coleoptera: Asaphidion flavipes (Linnaeus, 1761) (Carabidae); Tachyporus dispar (Paykull, 1789) (Staphylinidae). Hemiptera: Acrosternum heegeri Fieber, 1861 (Pentatomidae). Collembola: Entomobrya regularis Stach, 1963 (Entomobryidae); Lepidocyrtus lusitanicus piezoensis (Simón-Benito, 2007) (Entomobryidae); Jordanathrix articulata (Ellis, 1974) (Sminthuridae); Sminthurinus quadrimaculatus (Ryder, 1879) (Katiannidae); Himalanura sp. (Entomobryidae); Protophorura sp. (Onychiuridae). Hymenoptera, parasitoids: Aphidius colemani Viereck, 1912 (Braconidae); Aphidius ervi Haliday, 1834 (Braconidae); Aphidius matricariae Viereck, 1912 (Braconidae); Aphidius rhopalosiphi Stefani-Perez, 1902 (Braconidae); Aphidius rosae (Haliday, 1834) (Braconidae); Aphidius urticae Haliday, 1834 (Braconidae); Centistidea ectoedemiae Rohwer, 1914 (Braconidae); Meteorus unicolor (Wesmael, 1835) (Braconidae); Meteorus collaris (Spin.) Hal. – Ruschka, Fulmek, 1915 (Braconidae); Orthostigma cratospilum (Thomson, 1895) (Braconidae); Orthostigma latriventris Ratzeburg, 1844 (Braconidae); two other species of Orthostigma sp.; Pseudopezomachus bituberculatus (Marshall, 1905) (Braconidae); Tanycarpa punctata (van Achterberg, 1976) (Braconidae); Gonatopus clavipes (Thunberg, 1827) (Dryinidae). New genera not previously recorded for the Azores include: Pycnetron sp. (Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae); four species of Aspilota sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae); four species of Chorebus sp. (Braconidae: Aphidiinae: Alysiinae); Microgaster sp. (Braconidae: Microgastrinae); Homolobus sp. (Braconidae: Homolobinae); Lodbrokia sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae). These 37 taxa were found in several Islands and five are new species for Flores Island, 10 species are new for Pico Island, 12 species are new for Terceira Island, 19 species are new for S. Miguel Island and five species are new for S. Maria Island. Additional species records for the Islands included: Flores (5 Collembola, 9 Araneae; 2 Hemiptera; 8 Coleoptera, 8 Hymenoptera), Pico (4 Collembola; 7 Araneae; 4 Hemiptera; 11 Coleoptera; 9 Hymenoptera), Terceira (4 Collembola; 1 Araneae; 3 Hymenoptera), S. Miguel (1 Araneae; 2 Coleoptera; 3 Hymenoptera), S. Maria (5 Collembola; 3 Araneae; 2 Hemiptera; 2 Hymenoptera).
Shuting Qiu, Bin Chen, , , Jianji Liao, Xinming Liu, Wen Yang
Published: 8 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63945

Abstract:
The Xisha Islands are composed of the Yongle Islands and the Xuande Islands in Hainan Province, China. It has one of the highest species diversity in the world and is also a typical oceanic distribution area of coral reefs globally. The ichthyofauna of the Xisha Islands were recorded by underwater visual census in May 2019 and July 2020. The survey data were combined with previous records of species into the checklist of the Xisha Islands presented herein. A total of 691 species, belonging to 24 orders and 97 families, was recorded. The major families were Labridae, Pomacentridae, Serranidae, Chaetodontidae, Hexanchidae, Lutjanidae, Scaridae, Gobiidae, Scorpaenidae and Carangidae. In this study, the Coral Fish iversity Index (CFDI) of six families (Chaetodontidae, Pomacanthidae, Pomacentridae, Labridae, Scaridae and Acanthuridae) was 229, indicating 756 coral fishes. In terms of the IUCN Red List, one species is Critically Endangered (Glyphis gangeticus), six species are Endangered (Stegostoma fasciatum, Aetomylaeus maculatus, Aetomylaeus vespertilio, Epinephelus akaara, Cheilinusundulatus sp. and Xiphias gladius), 16 species are Vulnerable, and 13 species are Near Threatened in the Xisha Archipelago, so conservation should be strengthened in this area in the future. One species is a new record for China (Dischistodus pseudochrysopoecilus) and 23 species are newly found in the Xisha Islands.
Ardath Francis, , Suzanne Warwick, , Sara Martin
Published: 4 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e58773

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, Sebastián Martínez, Mónica Cadenazzi, Mónica Urrutia, Lucía Seijas, Enrique Castiglioni
Published: 4 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e60745

Abstract:
This work is a first approach to the knowledge of insects and other aquatic macroinvertebrates of rice agroecosystems from eastern Uruguay. The composition of the groups collected may represent an approximation to the knowledge of the quality of water sources associated with Uruguayan rice production. Sampling of aquatic macroinvertebrates was carried out during the grain-filling stage in crops without insecticide use, in three localities of Treinta y Tres Department. In each crop, macroinvertebrates were collected with a Surber-type network at the inlet and outlet of water to and from the paddy field and a neighbouring control area. Differences in morphospecies composition were found according to the location and source of water. Insecta was the most represented class in macroinvertebrate samplings (41.5%). Diptera (59.9%), Hemiptera (16.3%) and Ephemeroptera (14.0%) were the most abundant orders within insects. The Richness and Shannon Diversity Indices were higher than those recorded for similar studies in Costa Rica, Italy and Australia.
, Dinesh Bhatt, Ashish Arya
Published: 1 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e61422

Abstract:
The Western Himalaya is recognised for its biological diversity and ecological values. An attempt was made to understand the avian diversity distribution in Forest, Agriculture and Water stream habitats of Dehradun (Western Himalaya) Uttarakhand. A total of two hundred and thirty one species belonging to 54 families were encountered during the survey. Out of these, one endangered species (Egyptian Vulture, Neophron percnopterus) and three near-threatened species Alexandrine Parakeet (Psittacula eupatria), Black-necked Stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticu) and River Lapwing (Vanellus duvaucelii) and one vulnerable species Woolly-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus) were sighted. Three avian species, Mistle Thrush, Sulphur-bellied Warbler and White-rumped Munia. have been recorded as isolates in the study area. The presence of these species indicates the habitats extension in Dehradun District of Uttarakhand. The present study provides significant records in the study site and provides a baseline data for future study with reference to conservation in Dehradun Region.
, , Fernando Peña-Cortés, Cristián Vergara Fernández
Published: 1 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63634

Abstract:
Species lists are fundamental for knowledge of species diversity in regions subject to intense anthropogenic pressure, especially in poorly-studied ecosystems. The dataset comes from an inventory conducted in 30 fragments of Myrtaceae swamp forest, located in an agroforestry matrix landscape of the coastal La Araucanía Region in Chile. The data collection was carried out using line transect sampling, which was traced through the core of each fragment orientated towards its longest axis. The dataset provides a record of 55 species (24 trees, 1 vine [as a host], 16 herbs and 15 shrubs) including accidental epiphytes (n = 7), hemiparasites (n = 4), host (n = 10) and additionally woody debris (n = 36). The most frequent trees in the landscape were Myrceugenia exsucca (n = 36 records) and Blepharocalyx cruckshanksii (n = 33 records), species that were also the most common hosts. Drimys winteri was a companion species, other trees and shrubs generally being rarely observed, as was the case of the introduced species (Prunus avium, Rubus constrictus and Ulex europaeus). Branches were the most common microhabitat for hemiparasites. Within this group, Lepidoceras chilense was the most frequent species. For accidental epiphytes, Drimys winteri, which commonly grows on the ground (soil), were the most common species found in the main trunk crotch. Some unusual observations were the climber Cissus striata as host of Tristerix corymbosus (hemiparasite) and Tristerix corymbosus as host of Lepidoceras chilense (hemiparasite). This study represents a landscape-scale sample of the swamp forest, which is distributed in a dispersed pattern over a large stretch of Chile. The data were collected from 30 forest patches (from 0.05 to 936 ha), located on the coast of the Araucanía. The database includes the presence of 55 species of vascular plants in 356 records. The main novelty of this contribution is the systematic classification of species under six traits, never before reported in the same database: (i) condition (coarse woody debris, fallen log, live, snag), (ii) habit (herb, shrub, tree), (iii) growth microhabitat (e.g. tree trunk, branch, main trunk crotch), (iv) growth form (accidental epiphyte, hemiparasite, terricolous, vegetative), (v) host species (as appropriate) and (vi) relative location of the species in the sampled patch and surrounding areas (core, border, matrix). Species not previously observed in these forests were: Gavilea spp., Hieracium spp., Lophosoria quadripinnata, Berberis actinacantha, Gaultheria phillyreifolia, Ovidia pillo-pillo, Amomyrtus meli and Caldcluvia paniculata. In addition, two introduced species are novelties for the catalogue of vascular plants of Chile (Cupressus macrocarpa and Prunus avium). Several of these ecosystem traits are indeed new reports for these types of forests (e.g. accidental epiphytes, fallen logs, species-host relationship); at the same time, more frequent data (i.e. species composition, habit) are found in different contributions, making the comprehensive process of analysis difficult. Accordingly, the database is made available in this manuscript.
Jun Yuan, Xiang-Yu Zeng, Kun Geng, Nalin Wijayawardene, Jayarama Bhat, Shi-Ping Wu, , Zai-Fu Yang
Published: 1 March 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e63643

Abstract:
Thunbergia grandiflora belongs to the family Acanthaceae and is a widely distributed dicotyledonous plant in tropical and subtropical regions. Three isolates of Allophoma (Dothideomycetes, Pleosporales, Didymellaceae) were collected from leaves of T. grandiflora in Guangxi Province, China. Phylogenetic analyses of a combined ITS–LSU–rpb2–tub2 dataset indicate that one of our three strains represents an undescribed species with close affinity to A. minor and the other two strains clustered amongst other isolates of A. pterospermicola. Evidence from morphology and sequence analysis indicates that GUCC 2070.7 is a new species that we introduce here as A. thunbergiae. This is the first report about taxa of Allophoma from this host plant.
, Rebaona Molefe,
Published: 25 February 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e60245

Abstract:
We conducted shotgun metagenomics sequencing of the maize rhizosphere and bulk soils in Ventersdorp, South Africa. Information on the structural composition and functional capabilities of microbial communities in the maize rhizosphere are provided by the data. Characterising the functional potentials of rhizosphere microbiomes gives an opportunity to link the microbiome to plant growth and health and provides the possibility of discovering new plant-beneficial genes that could enhance agricultural sustainability.
Published: 25 February 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e62868

Abstract:
The lace bug species Acalypta marginata (Wolff, 1804) has, to date, been widely known to occur in the Palaearctic Region, but has not been recorded from Japan. Acalypta marginata is recorded from Japan for the first time. Its habitat in Japan is the grassland of Hokkaido. A key to the species of Acalypta occurring in Japan is provided.
, Jannes Germishuys, Per Bergström, Mats Lindegarth,
Published: 24 February 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e60548

Abstract:
The increasing access to autonomously-operated technologies offer vast opportunities to sample large volumes of biological data. However, these technologies also impose novel demands on ecologists who need to apply tools for data management and processing that are efficient, publicly available and easy to use. Such tools are starting to be developed for a wider community and here we present an approach to combine essential analytical functions for analysing large volumes of image data in marine ecological research. This paper describes the Koster Seafloor Observatory, an open-source approach to analysing large amounts of subsea movie data for marine ecological research. The approach incorporates three distinct modules to: manage and archive the subsea movies, involve citizen scientists to accurately classify the footage and, finally, train and test machine learning algorithms for detection of biological objects. This modular approach is based on open-source code and allows researchers to customise and further develop the presented functionalities to various types of data and questions related to analysis of marine imagery. We tested our approach for monitoring cold water corals in a Marine Protected Area in Sweden using videos from remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs). Our study resulted in a machine learning model with an adequate performance, which was entirely trained with classifications provided by citizen scientists. We illustrate the application of machine learning models for automated inventories and monitoring of cold water corals. Our approach shows how citizen science can be used to effectively extract occurrence and abundance data for key ecological species and habitats from underwater footage. We conclude that the combination of open-source tools, citizen science systems, machine learning and high performance computational resources are key to successfully analyse large amounts of underwater imagery in the future.
, Gregório Freitas, , , Miguel Pinheiro de Carvalho
Published: 18 February 2021
Biodiversity Data Journal, Volume 9; doi:10.3897/bdj.9.e61091

Abstract:
Twenty-two native Crop Wild Relatives (CWR) occur in specific dry environments of Madeira Archipelago, like Desembarcadouro islet in Ponta de São Lourenço and Chão islet in Desertas Islands. Nine of them share the same gene pool with crop species included in Annex I of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Amongst them, Beta patula Aiton, an IUCN Critically Endangered species, has been studied in detail for in situ and ex situ conservation. The present paper summarises the information recorded during the Beta patula population assessment. Valuable information on plant communities associated with this species was obtained. The data provides information of a vegetation census spanning 7 years, from 2014 to 2020, in two uninhabited islets where Beta patula occurs, Desembarcadouro and Chão islets. The collected dataset consists of 1,786 vegetation descriptions, where 31 species were recorded. All generated data have been published and will be used towards the implementation of conservation actions and to establish a middle term management protocol for Beta patula and other CWR in situ conservation in the framework of a genetic reserve. This work is part of a EU LIFE Project, LIFE RECOVER NATURA and was conducted by members of the ISOPlexis Center, University of Madeira.
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