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Results in Journal Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas: 200

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Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 359-362; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00603016

Tomie Arai, Todd Ayoung, Shelly Bahl, Kerri N. Sakamoto, Lynne Yamamoto, Alexandra Chang
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 337-357; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-06030013

Dipti Desai
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 217-237; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-06030002

Abstract:
This essay explores the specific artworks of Asian American artists Tomie Arai and Flo Oy Wong as complex articulations between culture, identity, history, and memory. Based on oral history interviews that were integral parts of their artistic processes, Arai and Wong created works that explored the family histories and memories of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans living in New York City’s Chinatown and California. Their artworks open up a space to explore memory as a way of knowing that is shaped not only by what is said, but more importantly by what is not said—by silences and secrets.
Megumi Kitahara
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 92-109; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00601006

Abstract:
Fumie Taniguchi was a nihonga painter whose modern portraits of women enjoyed widespread acclaim within art circles during the 1930s. Although she moved to America shortly after Japan lost the war and spent the latter half of her life there, her existence was suddenly forgotten. There are almost no extant examples of Taniguchi’s paintings from her American period, however, her autobiographical novels that appeared in Japanese American fanzines provide significant clues that help to trace her life. Through these publications and oral interviews with her family members, this article seeks to introduce readers to the painterly practice and life of Taniguchi, and make clear what exactly was distinctive and unique about her life and practice. For a woman who continued to struggle against the patriarchal gaze both in Japan and the Japanese American community, what did the notion of transcending borders mean?
Rebecca Sue Jennison
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 11-26; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00601002

Abstract:
This article focuses on selected art works by third-generation Zainichi Koreans Haji Oh and Soni Kum, and Okinawan-based Chikako Yamashiro to explore ways in which these artists have continued to develop innovative, interdisciplinary practices to explore contact zones and liminal spaces in the East Asian context. Drawing on Françoise Lionnet and Shu-mei Shih’s notion of minor transnationalism, it argues the creative interventions of the three artists shed light on complex histories of minor transnationalism and at the same time alert us to ways in which the legacies of colonialism, migration and war continue to evolve in the present in Okinawa, Jeju Island, and Japan. Deploying different media, practices and techniques, all three artists aim to deterritorialize dominant visual and historical narratives and draw inspiration from minor literatures in ways that disrupt binary and vertical relationships, making visible minor to minor connections and ways of envisioning horizontal networks.
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 27-47; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00601003

Abstract:
This article elucidates major transnationalism and minor transnationalism through an analysis of works by New York-based Japanese artist Yoko Inoue (b. 1964). Inoue engages in social criticism through varied media such as ceramics, installations, and performance art. Her works demonstrate minor transnationalism observed in the relationships she has built with other transmigrants and minoritized individuals over such issues as xenophobia and racism after 9/11, as well as Hiroshima/Nagasaki and related contemporary nuclear issues. Inoue also addresses the disparities in collective memory and narratives between Japan and the US plus socio-economic inequalities between nation-states and the movement of people/goods/money within Trans-Pacific power dynamics, all of which illustrate major transnationalism in the Trans-Pacific.
Laura Kina
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 48-70; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00601004

Abstract:
This article examines how Okinawan Indigenous identity is influenced by “minor” Trans-Pacific interchanges between the Native Hawaiian sovereignty movement and Native American discourses on Indigeneity. Drawing from interviews with fellow Okinawan diaspora artist Denise Uyehara, the author explores their parallel responses as fourth generation Okinawan Americans to the recent resurgence of Okinawan Indigenous cultural history, practice, and identity. Uyehara’s collaboration with Native American artists in the performance Archipelago (2012) with Adam Cooper-Terán (Yaqui/Chicano), Ancestral Cartographic Rituals (2017) in collaboration with the late Payómkawichum, Ipi, and Mexican-American artist James Luna (1950–2018), and the immersive theatre project Shooting Columbus (2017) collaboration with The Fifth World Collective, is put into conversation with Kina’s painting series Sugar and Blue Hawai‘i (2010–2013) about Hawaiian sugar plantations and her trilingual illustrated children’s book Okinawan Princess: Da Legend of Hajichi Tattoos (Bess Press, 2019) written by Hawai‘i Creole author Lee A. Tonouchi.
Valerie J. Matsumoto
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 6, pp 71-91; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00601005

Abstract:
Mitsu Yashima (1908–1988) was a political dissident and artist in two countries. In prewar Japan, she became a proletarian rights activist; during World War ii she continued to oppose Japanese militarism by working for the United States government. In her later years, she opposed US militarism during the Vietnam War. In San Francisco, she became an admired cultural worker in the Asian American movement. Examining her life offers rare glimpses of a woman’s efforts to forge a career in the male-dominated art worlds of twentieth-century Japan and the US. Her transnational life expands the boundaries of Japanese American history, which has long focused on late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century immigration to the US West and Hawaiʻi. Her activism also challenges the perception that only third-generation Japanese Americans joined the Asian American movement of the 1960s-1970s. Yashima’s concern for human rights and peace fueled her art, political engagement, and community building.
Marsha Pearce
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 315-328; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00503004

Abstract:
Although a notion of creolization is used as a lens through which dynamic processes of exchange in the Caribbean are explored, Caribbean Creole culture and identity are, more often than not, understood in terms of a mix of expressions derived from Africa and Europe. This framing of Creole culture marginalizes the Asian diaspora in the Caribbean. People of Asian ancestry are positioned at a sensory threshold, a barely perceptible space. This article considers how that space is challenged and reconfigured in art production, with a specific focus on the visual art practice of Trinidadian artist Susan Dayal, who is of Chinese and Indian ancestry. It deploys the Quaysay, or junction space, as an aesthetic metaphor—a notion appropriated from the iconic Trinidadian artist Carlisle Chang (1921–2001), who grew up at a crossroads called the Croisée (written as “Quaysay” by Chang) in the town of San Juan, Trinidad and Tobago.
Nalini Mohabir
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 293-314; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00503003

Abstract:
This article focuses on the kala pani (dark waters) as a deathscape particular to indentured labourers and their descendants. Following a historical discussion of representations of the kala pani, the author turns to contemporary artists Maya Mackrandilal and Andil Gosine to explore how their artistic engagements are rerouting the flows of the kala pani away from discourses of caste stigma or the finality of (social) death to a reckoning of past and future time for those living in the diasporic space of North America.
Alison J. Miller
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 329-356; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00503005

Abstract:
The paintings of Gajin Fujita (b. 1972) express the urban Asian diasporic experience in vivid images filled with historic and contemporary cultural references. Creating an amalgamation of contemporary sports figures, hip-hop culture, historic Japanese painting conventions, street art, and the visual language of Edo Japan (1600–1868), Fujita reflects his diverse experiences as a citizen of twenty-first century Los Angeles in his paintings. This article introduces the artist and provides a nuanced examination of his works vis-à-vis an understanding of the larger issues addressed in both Edo artistic practice and contemporary street art culture. By specifying the agents of power and performance in Fujita’s works, a greater understanding of the hybrid world of his colourful graphic paintings can be found.
Falu Bakrania
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 259-292; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00503002

Abstract:
Extending the archive of South Asian American visual culture to the kinds that community activists use in public spaces expands our understanding of how such cultures contest dominant discourses of home. In this article, I examine how the uses of theatre, photography, and clothing by the San Francisco Bay Area-based “Berkeley South Asian Radical History Walking Tour,” and the anti-domestic violence exhibit I Dare to Air created by Maitri, generate particular affective relationships to public and private space. These relationships in turn produce resistant knowledges of “home” that challenge the racist logics of the Trump administration and the violent logics of a rising Indian American capitalist class. The work of community activists thus demands that we invigorate space as an analytic through which we theorize the import of South Asian American visual culture.
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 405-408; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00503013

Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 31-56; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00501003

Abstract:
The politics and the poetics of sugar and its production have long connected African and Asian diasporas as the material legacy of the Caribbean plantation. This article considers the repurposing of sugar as art and the aesthetic of artists of Afro-Chinese descent, Andrea Chung and Mara Magdalena Campos-Pons. Part of a diasporic tradition of employing sugar as a medium that I call sugarwork, their artwork evokes the colonial entanglements of nutrition and labour on the plantation, centered in the belly. The womb makes, and the stomach unmakes. This practice, employing the materiality of foodstuffs, is part of a gastropoetics, wherein centering the sensorium opens alternative forms of knowledge production to the European colonial archive. As the descendants of enslaved Africans and indentured Chinese, Campos-Pons and Chung metabolize sugar in ways that grapple with the futurity of the plantation to form a new intertwined genealogy of black and Chinese womanhood.
Stephanie Kaczynski
Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas, Volume 5, pp 240-243; https://doi.org/10.1163/23523085-00501019

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