Refine Search

New Search

Advanced search

Results in Journal Current Sports Medicine Reports: 1,885

(searched for: journal_id:(485615))
Page of 189
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Sara C. Pender, Aynsley M. Smith, Jonathan T. Finnoff, John Huston, Sciprofile linkMichael J. Stuart
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 380-386; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000752

Abstract:
The incidence of sport-related concussion coupled with a doubling of the participation rate in youth hockey over the past two decades provides impetus for the review of the most promising concussion treatment options. This narrative review summarizes the future treatment options for sport-related concussions in ice hockey, while acknowledging their generalizability to concussion in all sports. Symptom assessment, sign observation, as well as cognitive and balance testing, have historically been used to diagnose a concussion. These methods continue to improve, but the need for effective treatments is clear. Pharmacologic, transcranial light, and nutritional supplement treatment options for concussion warranting further investigation have been identified. Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory compound thought to trigger antioxidant gene expression. Memantine reduces apoptosis and astrogliosis by inhibiting the calcium influx into cells normally caused by glutamate's activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptides and transcranial photobiomodulation temper the effects of the energy crisis by acting as free radical scavengers. In addition, seven neuroprotective nutritional supplements have been identified: berberine, creatine, curcumin, melatonin, omega-3 fatty acids, resveratrol, and vitamins. An estimated US $1.1 billion has been spent on unsuccessful traumatic brain injury clinical trials. As our ability to accurately diagnose concussion improves, dimethyl fumarate, memantine, thioredoxin-mimetic peptides, transcranial photobiomodulation, and nutritional supplements (berberine, creatine, curcumin, melatonin, omega-3 fatty acids, resveratrol, and vitamins) warrant further preclinical and clinical examination in advancing the treatment of sport-related concussions.
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 343-343; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000744

Sciprofile linkKyle Casadei, John Kiel, Michael Freidl
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 367-372; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000749

Abstract:
Triceps tendon injuries are an uncommon clinical entity poorly described in the literature. This review discusses the spectrum of pathology, effective diagnosis, nonsurgical treatment, surgical treatment, rehabilitation, and surgical complications of triceps tendon injuries. Management of triceps tendinopathies depends on the mechanism of injury and the patient's motor examination. Triceps tendinopathies and partial tendon tears with intact strength can be managed conservatively with rest, ice, immobilization, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and physical therapy. If conservative management fails for 6 months or there are strength deficits on examination, surgery should be considered. Based on the current evidence, there are no clear guidelines for “best” surgical approach. Although rare, the most significant surgical complication to be concerned about is rerupture. Rerupture rate is 4.62% among the articles we reviewed.
William O. Roberts, David J. Satin
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 345-346; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000746

Sciprofile linkKelly D. Ryan, Joseph Brodine, Jason Pothast, Adrian McGoldrick
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 373-379; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000750

Abstract:
Horseracing is among the most popular and increasingly lucrative industry sports in the nation. The average jockey must control a thoroughbred horse 10 times their weight that may act unpredictably whether at rest or full gallop resulting in falls, kicks, or even biting injuries. Despite the risks, jockeys do not have access to the same quality of medical care that is standard in similarly profitable sports organizations. Beyond the mental and physical demands of training and performance endured by any professional athlete, jockeys are confronted with health challenges unique to their sport. In this review of the literature, we aim to educate sports medicine physicians regarding the underlying causes of injuries, describe injury management, and make recommendations for appropriate preventive strategies. Overall, there is a void of literature, and so our authors offer expert opinion and encourage others to get involved in making this a safer sport.
Martin Laguerre, Shawn McGargill, Daniel C. Herman
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 344-344; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000745

Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 341-342; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000743

William H. West, Anthony I. Beutler, Christopher R. Gordon
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 353-359; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000751

Abstract:
Regenerative medicine is a growing field of musculoskeletal treatments that focuses on amplifying the body's natural healing properties to improve function and pain after injury. Regenerative treatments are applied locally at the site of injury and work though different mechanisms, some of which are unexplained at this time. Current evidence demonstrates benefit for certain regenerative treatments, but further standardization of treatments and additional studies are required to provide additional data to support specific regenerative treatments. This review seeks to explore the evidence and discuss appropriate use of the most common regenerative treatments including platelet-rich plasma, prolotherapy, autologous mesenchymal stem cells, human-derived allograft products, and saline.
Sciprofile linkTeonette O. Velasco, Jeffrey C. Leggit
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 347-352; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000747

Abstract:
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a debilitating condition primarily associated in highly active individuals with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 2000 persons/year. The etiology remains unclear to date. The differential diagnosis includes, but is not limited to stress fractures, medial tibial stress syndrome, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Clinical signs and symptoms include pain in the involved compartment with exertion dissipating quickly after activity. Diagnostic tests include intramuscular compartment pressure testing, magnetic resonance imaging, near-infrared spectrometry as well as shear wave electrography. Treatments consist of nonsurgical, surgical, or the combination of the two. Gait retraining and the use of botulinum toxin appear most promising. Diagnostic lidocaine injections are emerging as a prognostic and mapping tool. Minimal invasive surgical options are being utilized allowing quicker return to activity and decreased morbidity. This article reviews the anatomy, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostics, nonsurgical, and surgical treatments for chronic exertional compartment syndrome.
Sciprofile linkSteven D. Trigg, Jeremy D. Schroeder, Chad Hulsopple
Current Sports Medicine Reports, Volume 19, pp 360-366; doi:10.1249/jsr.0000000000000748

Abstract:
Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is one of the most rapidly evolving etiologies of hip pain. The 2016 Warwick Agreement consensus statement defined FAI syndrome as a triad of symptoms, signs, and radiographic findings. Cam morphology is more likely in athletes and is associated with repetitive hip loading in maximal flexion during adolescence. Much less is known about the development of pincer morphology. Physical therapy improves pain and function, justifying a trial before pursuing surgery. Musculoskeletal injections are utilized for FAI syndrome, but the evidence is limited. Arthroscopic surgery for FAI syndrome can correct the morphological changes and address the underlying soft tissue injuries. Recent studies evaluated reliable indicators of surgical outcomes, the most reliable of which is the presurgical presence of osteoarthritis. Recent studies demonstrate the efficacy of surgery, but with the risk of complication and no guarantee of a return to the same level of sport.
Page of 189
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top