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Results in Journal Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature: 70

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Ying Hua
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 30-45; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i4.76

Abstract:
In order to provide the interpersonal, rhetoric and semiotic insights for studying corporate emotional branding discourse on social media, this study attempts to target China’s state-owned enterprises which represent the pillars of national economy with Chinese characteristics and shed light on the discourse realizations of their emotional branding strategies from the textual and interpersonal perspectives. Specifically, the present study focuses on the two kinds of textual and interpersonal representations on China-based Sina Weibo: 1) the use of stylistic features; 2) the use of attitudinal appeals. A corpus of forty-day updates of the three giant Chinese state-owned enterprises on Sina Weibo is retrieved and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results suggest the prevalence of involving stylistic features, the proliferation of affect and judgment appeals and the hybridization of appreciation and affect/judgment, which posits interdiscursivity and intertextuality in communicative functions. China’s state-owned enterprises communicate to forge emotional bonding with the public other than promote their products. This pragmatic shift towards solidarity facework is indicative of a transcultural phenomenon elicited by digital globalization and the neoliberalist trend in China’s national economy.
Heather Alberro
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 27-29; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i4.75

Abstract:
This engrossing interdisciplinary collection, edited by French studies Professor Keith Moser and Central American literary scholar Karina Zelaya of Mississippi State University, explores numerous iterations- historical, literary, ecological, sexual- of the monstrous ‘other’. As such, the collection would be of interest and relevance to scholars from a host of disciplines: from international relations and security studies to environmental ethics and postcolonial studies. The work is divided into four parts, each featuring essays that correspond to a particular sub-discipline within monster studies: Part I (Ecological perspectives), Part II (Transgressive, Monstrous gender and Corporality), Part III (Teaching monstrosity in the (Post-)Modern World), and Part IV (Monstrosity in World Literature). This structure is particularly useful in helping the reader discern the unique contributions offered by each field to the analysis of monster metaphors.
Sharif Uzzaman
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 20-26; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i4.74

Abstract:
Though Rabindranath Tagore’s works have been studied and praised for decades around the world, his struggles to reconcile cultural as well as linguistic differences between English and his native tongue, Bengali through translations of his works have largely been overlooked. This paper though a comparative study between Tagore’s drama Raktakarabi and its translated version Red Oleanders, seeks to find out how Tagore deals with various cultural, literary and linguistic issues that have arisen during the translation and whether the differences between two languages with distinct natures and unique histories have forced him to make fundamental changes to the play. The research also aims to critically look at the reasons behind Red Oleanders’ apparent failure in the west and takes into account relevant translation theories to discuss how various changes to the play have contributed to creating stark contrasts between the original and the translation.
Lou Lingling
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 14-19; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i4.71

Abstract:
Curriculum ideological and political education is the innovation and sublimation of contemporary educational curriculum concepts starting from the essential requirements of “education”. Curriculum ideological and political education is not a specific course. It integrates the function of ideological and political education in colleges and universities into all curriculum teaching activities, and realizes the integration of knowledge education and ideological and political education in specialized courses, as well as the education of students’ outlook on life and values in daily teaching. As a new direction of teaching reform in higher education, curriculum ideological and political education is the concentrated embodiment of the educational concept with Chinese characteristics in the new era. After clarifying the connotation of curriculum ideological and political education, this paper discusses the main problems existing in the construction of curriculum ideological and political education in specialized courses of English school and the deep-seated reasons behind the problems, and finally puts forward the realization paths of curriculum ideological and political education for specialized courses from the perspective of optimization theory.
Faye Margarette G. De Leon, Rachelle Ballesteros-Lintao
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 1-13; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i4.70

Abstract:
This research paper was aimed at providing a thorough content analysis on memes’ linguistic aspect and further understanding them in the light of their usage as political propaganda. A total of 60 memes were culled from July 2016 to December 2018. According to the memes’ linguistic and visual organization, they have the ability to create and simplify complex political narratives by employing primarily the categories of Shops, Text, and Stacked Stills based on Milner’s (2012) Taxonomy of Meme Collectives. The memes’ humor signifiers were mainly intertextuality, parody, and binary opposition which highlighted how memes are contextual in nature and use exaggeration and opposing concepts to elicit humor. On the other hand, the memes vary in their respective denotations as well as in their connotations which often point to humanization and discreditation. Lastly, for the memes’ propaganda characteristics, they possess all 10 of Walton’s (1997) propaganda characteristics while the audience perceived 9 out of 10 through the conducted survey. This proves that memes do have the potential to be used as tools for propaganda because of their inherent manipulation of complex political narratives which are furthered through the use of humor.
Jebun Ara Geeti
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 1-7; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i3.62

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Guanghua Chen
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 27-34; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i3.67

Abstract:
The Trade Agreement between China and the U.S., as any agreement does, imposes obligations or grant rights to the parties. As it is known by the public, the Chinese agreement versions are generated from translation of the English version instead of being independently negotiated, yet both versions are equally effective. The differences between the two legal systems, between the two languages, and even between the mentalities of the two peoples all play an important part in the execution of the agreement. Every word, complex or simple, is closely associated with obligations and rights, and negligence in translation is not acceptable. The present study aims to make some suggestions for the improvement of the Chinese version and call attention to the issues likely to be hidden at the back. Research in related areas is relatively scarce. This study, expounding from translation and legal perspectives, might contribute to clarifying the obligations and rights of the two contractual parties and the academic circle. And it tentatively proposes the new term of paradigm equivalence.
Omnia Ibrahim
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 8-19; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i3.63

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Samaila Yakubu
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 20-26; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i3.66

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Dan Manolescu
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 30-32; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.56

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Binghui Li, Shuyan Wang
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 47-52; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.60

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Marko Pajević
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 1-10; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.53

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Adamou Idé Oumarou
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 42-46; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.58

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Rachel Ayuk Ojong Diba
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 22-29; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.55

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Sara Fadla, Yousef Awad
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 11-21; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.54

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Lou Lingling
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 53-59; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.61

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Khaled M. Shuqair
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 33-41; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.57

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Binghui Li, Shuyan Wang
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 47-52; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i2.59

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Frederick Luis Aldama
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 24-27; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i1.50

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Dan Manolescu
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 22-23; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i1.49

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Hadi Salehi
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 1-12; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i1.47

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Al Walid
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 2, pp 13-21; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v2i1.48

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Chunlei Wang, Na Li
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 22-27; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.39

Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to explore the terminology, concepts and access to bilingual lexical representation. The core problem of linguistic cognitive structure is linguistic representation which is the reflection of individual psychology on linguistic knowledge. In terms of linguistic representation, the research and experiments on the evidence of lexical representation in modern psycholinguistic period are reviewed. Psycholinguistic studies attempt to apply elucidate language theories and model systems to operate and interpret representational data. We recognize that the use of the concept of lexical representation may contribute to the search for "psychological grammar" .Moreover, we present the original intention of studying bilingual representation and three approaches of the bilingual lexical representation: lexical meaning, direct representation of reality, functional representations. Our focuses are models of lexical access, variables that influence lexical access and appraising models of lexical access. Then we represent models of lexical access, which are influenced by variety of factors, including the frequency of a word, its phonological structure, its syntactic category, its morphological structure, the presence of semantically related words, and the existence of alternative meaning of the word. It is concluded that bilingual lexical representation access is influenced by a variety of factors.
Hosni M. El-Dali, Doha M. Abd El-Moety, Maha A. El-Seidi
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 28-40; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.40

Abstract:
The present study is an investigation of the parameters of power following in medical encounters in spoken Egyptian Arabic. The analysis will focus on the aspects of discourse: speech acts especially directives such as questions, orders and commands, features related to turn taking like different types of overlap, adjacency pairs and the concept of preference, Grice's concept of implicature and the politeness theory with its strategies for Face Threatening Acts. The study aims at drawing conclusions concerning power and ways of claiming it in Egyptian Arabic medical encounters. Thus, the study differs from previous studies not only in investigating the Arabic language but also in the aspects of analysis, which has not been examined before because each of the previous studies concentrates on only one aspect of analysis.
Leei Wong, Joshua Esler
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 13-21; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.38

Abstract:
Research on politeness has flourished since Brown and Levinson's (hereafter B&L) classical (1978, 1987) definition of politeness theory, and has extended to current research on impoliteness. However, there is a knowledge gap in the area of Teaching and Learning Politeness (hereafter TLP) in second language acquisition.This paper aims to identify this gap, by tracing the roots of research on TLP since 1975, to explore how past research has impacted current trends, and then focuses on the position and relevance of TLP in the local Australian curriculum, in the area of intercultural competency, benchmarked in reference to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The synthesis of the literature in this paper will elicit the challenges in TLP and potentially result in a clearer direction in the area of second-language research on politeness.
Ahmed Saleh Elimam
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 1-12; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.37

Abstract:
Marked, unconventional word order is one of the most pertinent stylistic features of the Qurʾan, and is employed to realise certain discursive functions. This article identifies the verses which foreground a lexical item to (or towards) sentence-initial position, resulting in a marked word order, as well as the functions realised thereby, drawing on classical commentaries on the Qurʾan. Two of the most important English translations of the Qurʾan by Abdel Haleem (2004/2005) and Arberry (1955/1998) are selected for closer examination of the strategies they use to deal with the corpus of verses. The discussion is carried out against the backdrop of the translators’ stated aims and reviews of their output. Furthermore, the potential influences of the translators’ motivations, target readers’ expectations, and the historical context of their work on their respective output are also discussed.
Walter Coronado Latorza
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 47-54; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.42

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Mohammad Hossein Abedi Valoojerdi
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 41-46; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.41

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Wenhui Yang, Jun He, Baoyu Fu
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 57-71; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.44

Abstract:
Metaphors are ubiquitous as they are a way for people to understand the world, and are usually translated by the strategy of either domestication or foreignization. The translators conducted a translation practice of “Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life” by applying a cognitive integration system to analyze the metaphorical devices of SKIN, GAME, SKIN IN THE GAME, and how their integration processes affected the translators’ decisions on the target versions in different contexts with various linguistic choices. The translating practice proves that, in different contexts, with different life experience and existed knowledge, the translators might present different degrees of autonomy and ways-of-seeing the world in the source text and linguistic preferences in the translation. Many selected linguistic choices applied in translation practice are intentional in nature and are a part of translators’ cognitive world, which are compositionally active with their knowledge background and extensional, referential and personal experiences. This finding provides an empirically-grounded analysis of cognitive integration in translation practice, attempting at bridging the gap between research in discouses analysis, conceptual structure, and language production in translation.
Heather Alberro
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 55-56; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.43

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Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 72-78; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i4.45

Abstract:
La invención de Morel reflect on how the use of technologies could be fascinating and dangerous at the same time; and the way the island seems to be a space of freedom while it is actually a place of prison and death. La invención de Morel presents a utopian situation that transforms into a dystopia. Characters, especially the narrator, project their desires along with the holograms, but they are deceived without realizing about their loss of reality. The novel uses phantasy and science fiction resources to reflect about the way humans self-imprison. This is studied by analogy to the effects of technologies in today's society. In this sense, the novel by Adolfo Bioy Casares is about a menace due to the human preference of imaginary life over real one.
Ying Xie
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 94-103; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.34

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Waleed Al-Galissy, Bhagwan S. Jadhav
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 89-93; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.33

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Jialin Zhao, Rainer Feldbacher
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 81-88; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.32

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Tanmoy Mazumder
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 64-69; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.29

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Natalie Reed
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 77-80; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.31

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Maryam Mohammadi Sarab, Mohsen Shahrokhi, Omid Tabatabaei
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 36-55; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.27

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Abdul-Lateef Solihu, Lilisuriani Abdul Latif
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 25-35; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.26

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Hamoud Althobaiti
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 20-24; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.25

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Wang Jun
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 14-19; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.24

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Robert Zaller
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 70-76; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.30

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Santiago Sevilla-Vallejo
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 56-63; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.28

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Sam Roodi, Masoud Farahmandfar
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 1-8; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.22

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Beatrice Jane Ekesa
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1, pp 9-13; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i3.23

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Andrew Bula
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i2.52

Andrew Bula
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i2.50

Ghassan Aburqayeq
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i2.61

Liqun Feng
Journal of Critical Studies in Language and Literature, Volume 1; doi:10.46809/jcsll.v1i2.56

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