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Results in Journal AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”: 41

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Roberta Ioli
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume -1, pp 1-34; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010041

Abstract:
Gorgias’ two speeches Encomium of Helen and Defense of Palamedes face, from different points of view, the problem of free will, deliberation and responsibility. While Palamedes is introduced as hero of the kratos, Helen can be considered as a victim of persuasion and erotic passion. My aim is to analyze Gorgias’ emphasis on sight and hearing as perceptions related to the origin of our actions: powerful perceptions can give rise to violent emotions and force people to change their nature, becoming different from what they previously were. By focusing on the Hippocratic medicine and ancient doctrines about the physiology of perception, we can shed new light on the arguments used by Gorgias in order to defend Helen overwhelmed by the seduction of logos and eros. What the Sophist is mainly interested in is the connection between perception, emotion, and our consequent disposition to act.
Antonio Rollo E Amneris Roselli
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 79-81; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010039

Carlo Delle Donne
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 31-48; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010037

Abstract:
The paper aims to examine the linguistic relationship between patients and physicians in the context of the therapeutic relationship. It focuses on the Hippocratic treatises and offers a detailed commentary of a controversial passage of Ancient Medicine par. 2.3. The dialogical model of Ancient Medicine is found to be centred on the patient’s experience; this same idealized model of relation is documented in Plato’s Laws. In the second part of the article the author examines some linguistic peculiarities of medical discourse, such as the use of comparisons and metaphors, and a passage from Galen’s On the Affected Parts that reports the case of a young patient and the difficulties inherent in the dialogue between patient and physician.
Giovan Battista D’Alessio
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 1-30; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010032

Abstract:
One of the greatest paradoxes of ancient Greek lyric poetry is its fundamental tension between the vivid evocation of a performance communicative context and the capability of the text to transcend the context itself. A key aspect of this is the way in which language can exploit both poles of this tension: the presentness of the performance and the transcendence of the text. This is a source of crucial interpretative problems, as well as of complex expressive potentialities. The focus of this paper is to examine some of the ways in which the shift of the use of first person indexicals serves the dialogue between text and performance, proceeding through three stages. In the first place I briefly analyze some different genres of discourse (drama, epistle, lyric) that in Archaic and Classical Greek display a complex use of indexicality calling attention to the ‘mediated’ nature of the communication process (§ 2). In the second stage I revise some examples of ‘mediated’ indexicality in Greek lyric in general (§ 3) and in Pindaric poetry in particular (§ 4). In the third stage I locate these cases within a wider comparative approach, exploring a suitable theoretical explanation of this important feature (§ 5).
Alessandro Bausi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 184-207; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010036

Abstract:
The tradition of Ethiopic texts, although characterized by a particular temporal articulation of its own that distinguishes texts from Antiquity and Late Antiquity and texts of the medieval age, has been and is the object of study of a philology that shares the history and paradigms of the other philologies of the Christian East; like these, throughout the course of the twentieth century and almost without exception, the criterion unwittingly selected and adopted as the norm of the ‘base manuscript’ dominated. Unlike the other philologies, however, in the last two decades of the twentieth century, the Italian school of Ethiopian studies renewed by Paolo Marrassini and eventually appreciated also in Europe and in Ethiopia, has largely applied the Neo-Lachmannian reconstructive stemmatic method to Ethiopic texts. Even in the absence of universal consensus, this method is still the only one that has prompted a theoretical-methodological reflection on the phenomenology of Ethiopic texts.
Vincenzo Fera
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 139-158; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010038

Abstract:
The aim of this paper is to explore the nature of author variants in the humanistic age, starting from a survey of the variants added by Petrarch to his unfinished work Africa during the revision of the text around the mid-fourteenth century. In particular, two new definitions of variant, which were presented in a previous paper, are here outlined and discussed, that is, ‘active variants’ and ‘working variants’. Furthermore, the so-called Scevola Mariotti’s norm in relation to the author variants’ authenticity is reviewed.
Tatiana Lekova
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 159-183; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010040

Abstract:
The paper deals with the methods developed in the field of Slavic philological research in the last centuries. The mission of Cyril and Methodius in Great Moravia and the activity of their disciples in the First Bulgarian Empire of Boris and Simeon laid to the foundation of a Slavic cultural and religious autonomy. The major problem of Cyril and Methodius’ studies has been to find the traces of their translations and to identify the area where the Palaeoslavic texts originated. The debate between R. Picchio and D. Lichačev revealed the clash between two different traditions in Slavic philological and literary studies; it opened a dialogue between Slavic and European scholars and led to a vast methodological and terminological renewal in the discipline. It was debated whether it was possible to apply to Slavic texts the methods developed in the field of Greek and Latin tradition, or a separate discipline Textology would be necessary for studying the history of Slavic texts and the conscious changes introduced by their coauthors and coeditors. A Linguistic Textology has also been created which limits the philological research to linguistic data. The article touches the new methods developed for the reconstruction of the Cyrill and Methodius’ Bible by means of the digitally supported profile-method applied to the editions of the Slavic Gospels. It is only at the beginning of this century that there has been a return to the method of textual criticism.
Tommaso Raiola
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 49-67; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010034

Abstract:
In books 46–49 of the Collectiones medicae, Oribasius collects a remarkable number of text excerpts, varying in size, from Galen’s commentaries on Hippocrates’ surgical treatises (In the surgery, On fractures, and On joints). Besides being a witness of indirect tradition for the surviving Greek text of the commentaries, these excerpts offer good overall specimens of Oribasius’ writing method. The paper analyzes some significant examples, in order to highlight Oribasius’ compilatory technique and the strategies he adopted to overcome the difficulties in building a continuous text moving from a non-continuous one.
Roberto Tottoli
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 208-222; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010035

Abstract:
Philological studies on Arabic and Islamic literature have traditionally been limited in many respects. The approaches to the texts and their editing have mostly reflected a primary interest in diffusing texts without sharing the editing methodology or discussing the specific problematic aspects of Arabic. In the realm of Qurʾānic studies most of the research has been devoted to the formation of the text and early manuscript evidence with some significant results but without addressing many other aspects and critical problems which still await the attention of scholarly research. Later manuscript attestations and the history of the printed Qurʾān have also been in general neglected fields of critical research.
Paolo Chiesa
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 109-127; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010033

Abstract:
This article sketches a short history of Latin literature of the Middle Ages (as academic discipline) in Italy; defines its possible boundaries and relationships with other disciplines; lists the peculiarities of textual criticism when applied in the specific field of Latin medieval texts; highlights the methodological contribution brought by the scholars of this discipline, in order to build a ‘global philology’.
Luigi Munzi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 68-75; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010029

Abstract:
Conceived as an Appendix to Il ruolo della prefazione nei testi grammaticali latini (AIONfilol 14, 1992, 103–126), this paper offers a selection of texts and loci similes related to the metaphoric and literary topic exploited in prologues and prefaces of Latin grammatical texts dated between late Antiquity and early Middle Ages (4th–9th cent.).
Michael D. Reeve
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 128-138; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010031

Abstract:
Some problems that arise over the three concepts named in the title are discussed with the help of passages drawn from classical Latin works.
Giuseppe Camodeca
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 42, pp 82-108; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010030

Abstract:
The author presents some editions or re-editions of inscriptions on stone and tabulae ceratae (Tabulae Pompeianae Sulpiciorum; Tabulae Herculanenses), highlighting the elements of interest for the philologist’s work and outlining a method for the study of this epigraphic material.
Francesco G. Giannachi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 155-193; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010014

Abstract:
The paper deals with the linguistic typology and the manuscript tradition of the interlinear glosses to the Pindaric victory odes, and demonstrates that some glosses to Pindar’s Pythian odes (1–4) can be ascribed to Magister.
Luigi Munzi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 109-126; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010027

Abstract:
A collection of satirical stories and sketches in form of prosimetrum found in ms. Dublin 602 and possibly written in England ca. 1200, was first edited by M. L. Colker in 1975: according to remarkable and pervasive influence of Petronius’ Satyricon, both in attitudes and in language, Colker named the text as ‘Petronius redivivus’. In a renewed edition published in 2007 the same scholar proposes to assign this text to Helias of Thriplow. This paper offers a thorough discussion of the constitutio textus and a few notes about linguistic peculiarities and technical dictionary.
Antonio Rollo
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 235-252; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010017

Abstract:
After displaying the theory of Theodosian nominal morphology, the paper offers an overview of the development of Greek grammar in Byzantium between the twelfth and the fourteenth centuries. Starting from Theodoros Prodromos’ handbook it takes on the study of the Erotemata of Moschopoulos and examines their relationship with the erotematic genre.
José-Antonio Fernández-Delgado
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010011

Abstract:
One aspect of the Greek epic that has yet to be thoroughly explored is the possibility of differentiating, in the midst of formulaic wording, the different genres that from the point of view of Greek literature comprise, for example, the telling of heroic deeds (Iliad, Odyssey), gnomic-paraenetic poetry (Works and Days), or the stories of genealogies, be they divine (Theogony), or heroic (Ehoiai). However, each of these forms of poetic expression had available a specific formulaic apparatus apart from the other much more abundant and more visible, the epic one, shared among the different genres. Thus has it been pointed out on some occasions, although the critics have scarcely pursued the consequences. Here my proposal consists of investigating the dynamics of the formulaic diction of oral poetry of the genealogical type, based on information provided in this regard by the Hesiodic poems of the Theogony, and above all, of the Catalogue of Women.
Giuseppe Ucciardello
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 208-234; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010016

Abstract:
The search for purity of language during the Palaeologan age has often been regarded as a revival of the Atticist movement of the second century AD. Students who had access to the higher education aimed at mastering this new form of Attic Greek: a large set of ancient authors deemed to be models of language and style served as repositories of lexical materials. Within this framework the need of school handbooks, dictionaries is quite understandable. In the first section of the paper I offer an overview of the multifarious typologies of scholarly texts largely used in the first Palaeologan age. Then, I focus more specifically on some miscellaneous excerpts merged into anthological manuscripts, by taking into account a largely overlooked series of grammatical and lexical annotations on Lucian. Differently from what is often stated in the catalogues, I show how the order of the items follows closely Lucian’s texts. These annotations could be the transcription of teachers’ notes and/or lecture notes taken during collective/private readings of texts.
Antonio Rollo, Niccolò Zorzi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 141-143; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010012

Luigi Bravi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 31-44; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010022

Abstract:
The paper draws attention on the secondary chorus of frogs in Aristophanes’ Frogs. Its actual presence on the stage is matter of discussion between scholars. The dramatic function of the frogs, the rapid dialogue with Dionysus and the close construction of verse in this lyrical dialogue seem to suggest the hypothesis of a visible chorus.
Javier Soage
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 127-137; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010028

Abstract:
The paper points out and discusses further manuscript tradition of two De littera grammatical texts, namely the De littera ex libro dom⟨i⟩ni Donati and two versions of the so-called De littera. The critical study of both tracts is brought up to date in light of the new witnesses as well as by re-evaluation of the known copies.
Riccardo Palmisciano
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 17-30; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010021

Abstract:
The A. supports with new arguments von der Mühll’s idea that in Anacreon fr. 356 PMG (=33 Gentili) Athenaeus has joined two distinct short poems. The first (fr. a) is an invitation to drink heavily in order to provoke Dionysiac enthusiasm; the second (fr. b) is an admonition against the degeneration of the symposium and a reminder of the rules of a well-ordered rite. The performance of the two poems must be placed in the same symposium at some distance of time, or, more probably, in different symposia: both could be performed whenever similar circumstances occurred. Some arguments are proposed in defence of Pauw’s amendment ἀνυβρίστως in fr. (a).
Gianfrancesco Lusini
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 274-284; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010020

Abstract:
The Ethiopian literary tradition extends over a time frame beginning even before the christianization of the Country (first half of the 4th cent.) up to modern times. In this long period we frequently register phenomena of interference both among different languages (Greek, Gǝ‘ǝz, Arabic, Amharic, agaw languages and so on) and between various registers of the same language, produced or conditioned by specific cultural or religious contexts. Particularly, in the Middle Ages the differentiation between Gǝ‘ǝz as the language of the clergy and the written discourse, and Amharic as the language of the court and the verbal communication, had momentous reflexes on the traditional teaching, related to Gǝ‘ǝz liturgical texts, but orally transmitted in Amharic. This development proved to be crucial for the start of the literarization process of Amharic, to be dated back to the second half of the 16th cent., as an effect of the missionary propaganda of the Portuguese Jesuits and of their polemics against the Ethiopian Orthodox clergy.
Giulio Colesanti
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 63-80; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010024

Abstract:
Deductive reasoning (as Hipponax composed choliambic verses in a psilotic Ionic, his Hellenistic imitators must also have reproduced psilosis in their choliambic works), the comparison with Theoc. Idyllls 28–31 (where he imitated the psilotic Aeolic dialect of Alcaeus) and above all the attested psilotic words in the verses of Phoenix of Colophon, Herodas and Callimachus suggest that the entire Hellenistic choliambic poetry was written in an Ionic characterised by psilosis.
Dina Micalella
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 45-62; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010023

Abstract:
The analysis of the testimonia of Aristotle’s De poetis fr. 73 Rose suggests a new interpretation of the meaning of the literary category of medietas, attributed by Aristotle to the Platonic dialogue.
Klaas Bentein
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 145-154; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010013

Abstract:
Whereas initially texts from the past were given relatively little attention in sociolinguistic studies, nowadays historical sociolinguistics as a discipline has come to maturity, too. A central notion in (historical) sociolinguistics is that of context: regrettably, however, there is still no generally accepted theory of how context can be captured and related to language. One of the few frameworks that has attempted to provide a coherent and unifying account is the so-called Functional Sociolinguistic framework. In this article, I illustrate the potential of this model for the study of Post-classical and Byzantine Greek complementation.
Martina Savio
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 99-108; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010026

Abstract:
An analysis of some significant examples shows that the phrase οἱ περὶ + accusative of a proper noun employed in the Homeric scholia and in Eustathius of Thessalonica’s Commentaries was an abridged expression conveying in any specific case different information concerning the sources quoted into these texts.
Gennaro Tedeschi
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 81-98; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010025

Abstract:
The paper combines the rich information on the different forms of theatre in Late Antiquity, collecting it from Byzantine literary texts, papyri and contemporary archaeological sources. The author pays particular attention to the religious and social context in which traditional forms of theatre, such as tragedy and comedy, and new forms of entertaining shows, such as mime and pantomime, have developed.
Stefano Valente
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 194-207; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010015

Abstract:
This paper sketches how the investigation both of Atticist lexica produced or copied during the Palaeologan age and of Atticist entries in more general lexicographic works of that period can contribute to historical sociolinguistic studies. When examining Byzantine lexicography from this perspective, the highly conservative character of the content should always be kept in mind. Despite the re-use of linguistic categories elaborated and employed in earlier scholarly traditions, Byzantine Atticist lexica still offer evidence to help us understand how some of these categories such as ‘Attic’ vs ‘non-Attic’ were applied during the Palaeologan age.
Staffan Wahlgren
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 267-273; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010019

Abstract:
In this paper work on building a linguistically tagged corpus of Byzantine texts (ByzTec) is discussed. In its present form the corpus consists of texts from the 10th and 14th centuries, and genres such as history, letter-writing and oratory are represented. Technical aspects of the corpus are described, as well as the different kinds of linguistic phenomena covered, such as morphology and semantics. So far, the primary purpose of the undertaking has been to facilitate the author’s own work on linguistic variation within an elite of Byzantine society. However, it is to be hoped that the corpus can be of use to others, including those interested in sociolinguistic aspects of Byzantine Greek.
Fevronia Nousia
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 41, pp 253-266; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010018

Abstract:
Manuel Moschopoulos’ Peri schedon, one of the most popular grammatical manuals in Byzantium and beyond, represents a comprehensive textbook composed with a broader scope in mind, namely to cover not only the teaching of grammar but also poetry and rhetoric.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 86-108; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010006

Abstract:
This paper examines the tradition of rhetorical exegesis on technical works – namely on Hermogenes’ treatises – flourished from the third century AD onwards. A focus on the evidence preserved proves the exegetes’ preference for the commentary format and the significant similarities in the structure and arrangement of the material with other exegetical literature of the same period. Moreover, by discussing further the content and scope of these commentaries, their relationship with teaching practice will be argued.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 58-85; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010005

Abstract:
The article offers an overview of the testimonies about Aelius Aristides’ reception in the didactic context of the late antique schools of rhetoric. After analysing the major issues relating Aristides’ presence in the rhetorical treatises (Hermogenes, Menander rhetor, the ps.-Aristidean ars), the paper focuses in particular on the (lost) commentaries to his mostly widespread works, namely the Panathenaic and the Platonic orations. From the scholia to these speeches it is possible to obtain some information about how these commentaries were, though the annotations which can be attributed with certainty to specific commentators (Metrophanes, Menander, Athanasius, Sopater, and Zosimus) are scarce. In a last section of the paper, some encomia featuring in Libanius’ epistle 1262 and Synesius’ Dio are discussed as far as they resonate with some remarks on Aristides’ style found in scholia, prolegomena, and in rhetorical treatises.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 156-196; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010009

Abstract:
Scholars have lengthy debated on the originality of the humanistic commentary on the classical authors with respect to the medieval commentaries on the same authors. If the question can be regarded as still open for the works written in the first half of the 15th century, the birth of the printing determined a dramatic change in the contents and the form of the commentaries. From the point of view of the content the humanists are much more interested in the different readings transmitted by the manuscripts, whilst the printing allows both to have different layouts of the commentaries and to insert new tools as indexes and page numbers for consulting them. The present paper will present the new aspects of the printed commentaries and will try to explain the reasons which produced each change.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 23-57; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010004

Abstract:
This article aims at mapping the scholia on the first lines from Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics A 1. It offers the first edition of the scholia on 71a1–21 from Vaticanus Gr. 241 (13th century), Laurentianus 72,3 (second half of the 13th century) and Laurentianus 72,4 (second half of the 13th / beginning of the 14th century). Appendix II and III present the content of a brief writing of Psellus about the Aristotelian Organon and the Praefatio to the Latin translation of Themistius’ Paraphrasis to Posterior Analytics written by Hermolaus Barbarus in the 15th century.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 197-239; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010010

Abstract:
In this paper we examine some treatises about interpretatio iuris that encode the methodology of the Italian ‘scuola del commento’, from the end of the Middle Ages onwards. Those writings reaffirm the primacy of the mens or sensus over the verba of the law. In all these treatises, the law is considered the expression of ratio rather than of the voluntas principis: therefore, its efficacy must be addressed by means of specific and different jurisprudential work. We illustrate this methodology through a detailed analysis of the treatises by C. Rogerio, B. Cepolla, S. Federici, P. A. Gammaro.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 138-155; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010008

Abstract:
The Compendium on Physics (Epitome physica) by the Byzantine theologian and philosopher Nikephoros Blemmydes (13th cent.) was a very successful textbook on Natural Philosophy containing a summary of physics, meteorology and astronomy. This compendium was also conceived for being used as support for teaching. For his purposes, Blemmydes combined passages taken from different sources into a new text: Aristotle and his commentators as well as Cleomedes were his main sources. Since a manuscript with an earlier version of the text still survives, it is also possible to go deeper into the workshop of this Byzantine author and to investigate the use of the sources in both textual stages. This paper will therefore be devoted to analysing the inner structure of the Epitome physica and Blemmydes’ activity as an author.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 109-137; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010007

Abstract:
Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus has been preserved in several manuscripts from the IX to the XVI centuries and in a paper scroll of the XI century, Patmos Eileton 897, containing two large parts of Book III (on the world’s body, on the recto, and on the world’s soul, on the verso of the scroll) and a large corpus of scholia vetera to it. This paper aims to examine the two main branches of the tradition of the Commentary and to give some observations on the exegetical apparatus to Proclus in the different forms of scholia figurata (and/or schemata), exegetical scholia, scholia to Proclus.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 7-22; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010003

Abstract:
Alexander of Cotiaeum, the cultivated sophistes and one among the teachers of Aelius Aristides and Marcus Aurelius, distinguished himself in linguistic and literary studies, teaching, and cultural communication. Though without achieving brilliant results, he also engaged in some of the questions previously discussed by the most learned scholars. This cultural figure displays some typicality with respect to the average educated personalities (grammatikoi) of the Antonine renaissance. However, current studies are revealing a possible specificity of Alexander’s role: his influence, by way of educational approach, on the making of literary trends and models (canons) of the concurrent high culture, between New Sophistic and Atticism. This paper focuses on the very philological side (diorthosis, or textual criticism) of the composite and complex intellectual profile of Alexander.
AION (filol.) Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Volume 40, pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1163/17246172-40010001

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