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Results in Journal Technology, Knowledge and Learning: 329

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Andrea Beerwinkle,
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-13; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09502-9

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, Shuai Zhang, R. M. Joshi, Anita Peti-Stantic
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09505-6

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, Ronel Du Preez
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-20; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09500-x

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-28; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09501-w

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-14; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09496-4

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09495-5

Abstract:
Scholars and practitioners argue that information and communication technology (ICT) provides flexibility of time and place and softens boundaries between students’ learning lives. The fluid movement between formal and informal learning contexts afforded by digital technology has prompted a re-definition of higher education learning environments to harness its potential. Further, technology can cater to diverse learners and promote lifelong learning in ways that the traditional didactic settings characteristic of tertiary contexts cannot. Scholars and practitioners have labelled this new teaching and learning landscape as smart pedagogy. This article engages with this scholarship by analysing a specific Australian case study in which ICT reforms have been deliberately implemented to adhere to smart pedagogies. Using collective biographies as a methodological tool, this inquiry provides insights into sensemaking experiences of a group of university academics whilst implementing ICT reforms anchored on Smart Pedagogy.
, Lauren E. Blackwell, Matthew Saenz
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09503-8

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-15; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09499-1

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Tien Ping Hsiang, , Zhisheng Wang, Yang Gong
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-27; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09492-8

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, Cristina Zammit
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-22; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09491-9

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-23; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09490-w

Abstract:
The range of teaching materials now available is becoming increasingly diverse. Despite this, however, the use and influence of textbooks in teaching still remains very high. When instructing reading comprehension, teachers often use textbooks as the basis for teaching in language lessons. Establishing a good match between textbooks and the skills to be acquired is therefore essential. In this paper, I investigate whether textbooks used in Austrian schools can adequately support the teaching of reading comprehension skills. Since reading comprehension is the basis for acquiring knowledge in all subjects, science textbooks are examined in addition to (German) language lesson textbooks. Thus, the content pages of four language textbooks and four science textbooks for fourth and sixth grade were analysed in terms of five different categories, i.e. general structural setup, learning goals, text types, text structures, and activities. The results reveal clear variations with respect to learning goals in language textbooks. For example, the extent to which reading comprehension is addressed ranges from 13.64 to 69.70%, depending on the book used. Although not addressed as a learning goal in the science textbooks, reading comprehension is often presupposed, especially in sixth grade. While the instruction of reading comprehension ought to entail coverage of reading strategies, this is often neglected, or only dealt with indirectly. Given the diversity of textbooks analysed, it seems all the more important to stress that teachers should: 1) clarify the goals and teaching strategies of a book before using it, 2) become aware of strategies that support the development of students' reading comprehension, and 3) use textbooks as a complementary (and not sole) tool to support reading comprehension in all subjects.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-20; doi:10.1007/s10758-021-09493-7

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, , Vedrana Gnjidić
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-18; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09485-z

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, Jessica Gatewood, Jaclyn J. Gish-Lieberman,
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-26; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09482-2

Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-21; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09487-x

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, Steven C. Mallam, Salman Nazir
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-43; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09489-9

Abstract:
Over the past decade, virtual reality (VR) has re-emerged as a popular technology trend. This is mainly due to the recent investments from technology companies that are improving VR systems while increasing consumer access and interest. Amongst many applications of VR, one area that is particularly promising is for pedagogy. The immersive, experiential learning offered by VR provides new training and learning opportunities driven by the latest versions of affordable, highly immersive and easy to use head mounted display (HMD) systems. VR has been tested as a tool for training across diverse settings with varying levels of success in the past. However, there is a lack of recent review studies that investigates the effectiveness, advantages, limitations, and feasibility of using VR HMDs in training. This review aims to investigate the extent to which VR applications are useful in training, specifically for professional skill and safety training contexts. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic review of the effectiveness of VR-based simulation training from the past 30 years. As a secondary aim, the methodological trends of application and practical challenges of implementing VR in training curriculum were also assessed. The results suggest that there is generally high acceptance amongst trainees for VR-based training regardless of the technology limitations, usability challenges and cybersickness. There is evidence that VR is useful for training cognitive skills, such as spatial memory, learning and remembering procedures and psychomotor skills. VR is also found to be a good alternative where on the job training is either impossible or unsafe to implement. However, many training effectiveness studies reviewed lack experimental robustness due to limited study participants and questionable assessment methods. These results map out the current known strengths and weaknesses of VR HMDs and provide insight into required future research areas as the new era of VR HMD’s evolve.
, Julie Owens, Alida Hudson
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-28; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09484-0

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, Andreia Nunes, São Luís Castro,
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09486-y

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Sotiria Tzivinikou, , Dimitra Kagkara
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-19; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09483-1

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, Giuseppina Cannella
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-21; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09480-4

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-26; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09481-3

Abstract:
This study investigated teachers’ views of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). The sample consisted of 30 teachers recruited from different cities of Turkey using criteria sampling. Phenomenology was the research method of choice. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview form and analyzed using content analysis. Participants use MOOCs because they are free of charge and have good content and high quality. MOOCs help them learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, gain professional knowledge, and develop skills, and positive attitudes and values. Most participants are interested in integrating MOOCs in their classes; however, they face various problems during MOOCs, such as loss of motivation and Internet connection issues. It is recommended that MOOCs be designed in such a way that they increase participants’ motivation and allow for feedback.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09479-x

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-30; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09473-3

Abstract:
Active learning strategies increase student engagement and performances, however, there is student resistance toward such instructional interventions. To overcome student resistance groupwork can be useful. In addition, digital technology can be used to re-design courses to add active learning techniques and support learning with and not from technologies. We developed active learning strategies in a digital environment, artifact-generated learning (AGL). The aim of this exploratory research was to study student engagement in AGL setting by focusing on how student work together, student satisfaction, motivation, and roles. We conducted an open course with students from various disciplines. We applied Chi’s conceptual framework of the three active learning levels of active-constructive-interactive (interactive is highest level), to study the AGL intervention in student groups. Methods of focus groups, observations, and online questionnaires were conducted to analyze group interaction. Results, presented for four student groups, indicate two groups were active-constructive, one group was interactive, and one group reached beyond the highest level that we call co-design level. Implications raise awareness to distinguish between active learners and co-designers. An interactive group is not necessarily a co-designer. A co-designer is an active student who also acts beyond the given course design as s/he constructively searches for and utilizes other resources in order to accomplish set goals. To overcome student resistance, a new process-based assessment format may enhance students to become co-designers on the group level.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-48; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09477-z

Abstract:
Technological innovations such as blended learning (BL) are rapidly changing teaching and learning in higher education, where BL integrates face to face teaching with web based learning. Thus, as polices related to BL increases, it is required to explore the theoretical foundation of BL studies and how BL were adopted and implemented in relation to students, lecturers and administration. However, only fewer studies have focused on exploring the constructs and factors related to BL adoption by considering the students, lecturers and administration concurrently. Likewise, prior research neglects to explore what practices are involved for BL implementation. Accordingly, this study systematically reviews, synthesizes, and provides meta-analysis of 94 BL research articles published from 2004 to 2020 to present the theoretical foundation of BL adoption and implementation in higher education. The main findings of this study present the constructs and factors that influence students, lecturers and administration towards adopting BL in higher education. Moreover, findings suggest that the BL practices to be implemented comprises of face-to-face, activities, information, resources, assessment, and feedback for students and technology, pedagogy, content, and knowledge for lecturers. Besides, the review reveals that the ad hoc, technology acceptance model, information system success model, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology, and lastly diffusion of innovations theories are the mostly employed theories employed by prior studies to explore BL adoption. Findings from this study has implications for student, lecturers and administrators by providing insights into the theoretical foundation of BL adoption and implementation in higher education.
P. M. M. C. Nuwan, B. A. K. S. Perera,
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-40; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09474-2

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09475-1

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-33; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09476-0

Abstract:
The tremendous growth of educational institutions’ electronic data provides the opportunity to extract information that can be used to predict students’ overall success, predict students’ dropout rate, evaluate the performance of teachers and instructors, improve the learning material according to students’ needs, and much more. This paper aims to review the latest trends in predicting students’ performance in higher education. We provide a comprehensive background for understanding Educational Data Mining (EDM). We also explain the measures of determining academic success and highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the most common data mining (DM) tools and methods used nowadays. Moreover, we provide a rich literature review of the EDM work that has been published during the past 12 years (2007–2018) with focus on the prediction of academic performance in higher education. We analyze the most commonly used features and methods in predicting academic achievement, and highlight the benefits of the mostly used DM tools in EDM. The results of this paper could assist researchers and educational planners who are attempting to carry out EDM solutions in the domain of higher education as we highlight the type of features that the previous researches found to have significant impact on the prediction, as well as the benefits and drawbacks of the DM methods and tools used for predicting academic outcomes.
, Kevser Eryılmaz, Esen Turan Özpolat, Ibrahim Yıldırım
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-16; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09471-5

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-17; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09470-6

Abstract:
This study represents the first research effort to explore the transition from traditional teaching into distance teaching in Swedish schools enforced by covid-19. Governments made gradual and injudicious decisions to impede the spread of the pandemic (covid-19) in 2020. The enactment of new measures affected critical societal functions and included travel restrictions, closing of borders, school closures and lockdowns of entire countries worldwide. Social distancing became the new reality for many, and for many teachers and students, the school closure prompted a rapid transition from traditional to distance education. This study aims to capture the early stages of that transition. We distributed a questionnaire to teachers’ (n = 153) to gain insights into teacher and school preparedness, plans to deliver distance education, and teachers’ experience when making this transition. Results show that the school preparedness was mainly related to technical aspects, and that teachers lack pedagogical strategies needed in the emerging learning landscape of distance education. Findings reveal four distinct pedagogical activities central for distance education in a crisis, and many challenges faced during the transition. While preparedness to ensure continuity of education was halting, schools and teachers worked with tremendous effort to overcome the challenges. Results expand on previous findings on school closure during virus outbreaks and may in the short-term support teachers and school leaders in making informed decisions during the shift into distance education. The study may also inform the development of preparedness plans for schools, and offers a historical documentation.
, Grzegorz Zwoliński, Sławomir Wiak, Lidija Petkovska, Goga Cvetkovski, Paolo Di Barba, Maria Evelina Mognaschi, Rain Eric Haamer, Gholamreza Anbarjafari
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-17; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09469-z

Abstract:
This paper introduces, explains and illustrates real-life application of virtual training tool for electrical engineering education. The tool gives users the opportunity to interact with and manipulate 3D models of authentic devices. The users have a possibility to compare structural differences between devices, assemble and disassemble the machines and test them under extreme conditions, all of which would not be possible while working with a real device. The 3D devices are fully operational allowing the users to interact with them on every level, including analysis of impact of supply conditions i.e. modify voltage and frequency of a particular motor and monitor changes in performance while still operating. The main goal of this research was to evaluate effectiveness and educational values of the proposed tool. Early studies and feedback from educators and students prove this tool to be a great assistance to process of education, facilitating knowledge acquisition and providing an innovative way to put theory into practice.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-19; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09467-1

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, Yuichi Toda, Rosie Flewitt
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-20; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09465-3

Abstract:
Many smart technologies offer personalized experiences, such as the possibility for children to record their voice, add their own pictures or drawings to digital stories, customize their avatars or adjust display settings to their needs. This study examined the views of teachers and digital software designers on children’s use of smart personalized technologies in Japan. Sixteen teachers and two designers from Japan took part in semi-structured interviews on the school or company premises in Tokyo and Osaka. Thematic analysis of the transcripts yielded three themes: agency, privacy and autonomy, which we consider through the lens of socio-materiality. While there were clear concerns about the protection of children’s privacy with personalized technologies, children’s agency and autonomy in using them was perceived both as a benefit and limitation of digital personalization features. The participants’ paradoxical perceptions of the risks and benefits of personalization point to a complex socio-technological model of personalization that is embedded in children’s smart technologies and influences adults’ views on their use in early education. Our findings have implications for informing and theorising the design of personalization features in digital technologies.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-23; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09462-6

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, Taiga Brahm
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-21; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09463-5

Abstract:
Although digital media are in general very common, their role in academic settings and their relevance for academic achievement are not satisfactorily explored. A research gap that is particularly apparent during the corona crisis in 2020 when university processes in many countries are suddenly almost completely digitalised. Research suggests a link between students’ diversity, in particular, their socio-economic background, academic self-efficacy expectations, study-related attitudes, and academic achievement. However, previous empirical studies on digital media at universities predominantly describe different types of media usage patterns but little is revealed about the students’ study-related attitudes and performance. The present study aims at developing a survey instrument to explore the relationship of individual, contextual as well as social background factors concerning academic achievement, with a special focus on academic and digital media self-efficacy expectations (DMSE). For this purpose, a new scale for DMSE has been constructed, based on existing psychological research. After pre-testing the instrument in 2017, data was collected at four German universities in summer 2018 (n = 2039). Validity and reliability are shown and the instrument appears suitable for further research in order to explore the interplay of student learning and digital media use in higher education, integrating the institutional and social context.
Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-26; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09461-7

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Technology, Knowledge and Learning pp 1-40; doi:10.1007/s10758-020-09456-4

Abstract:
Recent developments in human–computer interaction technologies raised the attention towards gamification techniques, that can be defined as using game elements in a non-gaming context. Furthermore, advancement in machine learning (ML) methods and its potential to enhance other technologies, resulted in the inception of a new era where ML and gamification are combined. This new direction thrilled us to conduct a systematic literature review in order to investigate the current literature in the field, to explore the convergence of these two technologies, highlighting their influence on one another, and the reported benefits and challenges. The results of the study reflect the various usage of this confluence, mainly in, learning and educational activities, personalizing gamification to the users, behavioral change efforts, adapting the gamification context and optimizing the gamification tasks. Adding to that, data collection for machine learning by gamification technology and teaching machine learning with the help of gamification were identified. Finally, we point out their benefits and challenges towards streamlining future research endeavors.
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