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Roberto Acevedo, Andrés Soto-Bubert
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-1

Abstract:
This research article aims to tackle the many challenges that the academic communities all over the country should face and resolved with reference to several items such as the introduction into new methodologies. The strategies to overcome our weakness and the facilities which should be made available to become highly competitive and therefore to contribute to our nation and citizens. The main ideas discussed in this article are the result of several decades of doing both research and lecturing for both undergraduate and the postgraduate levels. For a rather long period of time, we have been through a critical state and in a short period of time, senior professors and the whole academic staff have been working online and several crucial activities have shown a growing state of deterioration. Some experimental activities have been declared non-essential due to this biological crisis and therefore, these duties will have to be redefined soon. In agreement with the above reflections, we may anticipate the need for a new strategy and methodology to fulfil the requirements to achieve the knowledge and experience needed to become a highly qualify professional and /or a member of the academic community in all the levels of the undergraduate and postgraduate studies. In the first place, we must be aware of our weakness and strengths. Once the problems have been defined clearly, the next step of our article will be based upon the evidence at our disposal. Chile as a country, for a rather long time, has based its economy on exporting minerals (metallic and non-metallic) and non-renewable resources. The above-mentioned strategy adopted by the country for many decades, has proved to be the wrong approach when compare with the status of developed countries in the United States of America, Europe, and Asia. We must, then proceed to a complete change of paradigm. We have formidable challenges in front of us and it is our main duty to deal with this rather complex scenario. As a result, we need to include in this research article some additional items such the direction of new studies, some implications, and contributions to illustrate the readers with a more precise and comprehensive approach. In our view, we must move from the stage of diagnosis to that of the action to reach a reasonable position in the world economy. Without any doubt a highly qualified and well recognized of education is a key factor in our approach. Finally, but not at last, we discuss the concepts of innovation and entrepreneurship for our students and professionals.
Cao Thuy Xiem, Truong Doan The
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-2

Abstract:
Continuous quality improvement of service is a crucial factor for the existence and development of educational institutions. Clarifying and judging the importance of the service’s quality factors are essential elements of quality improvement. The quality of the training services provided by universities in Vietnam have been examined by numerous pieces of research. They focused on a group of subjects, a branch of the university, a major, and assessment of student satisfaction with the use of a toolkit introduced by the MoET or by a school of the university. From these foundations, the purpose of this research is to identify the quality factors of the training service provided by the National Economics University (NEU) as a whole. Education quality is a complex concept and cannot easily be assessed by only one indicator. However, because of the timeframe and the lack of finance, we examined the service quality of NEU from the student perspective by assessing their satisfaction using the SERVQUAL model. The data collection was done by through an online survey. The empirical analysis resulted in 5 factors influencing the quality of the service, assurance, reliability, responsiveness, empathy, and tangibles. From these factors, three suggestions were made for improving the quality of the service: adjusting course structures; retraining communication skills for office staff; upgrading Wi-Fi/internet connection; optimize physical facilities usage. The research findings also have social significance, as empathy was identified as a quality factor. At the same time, the practical implications proposed for NEU’s governors have equal value for state-owned universities in general.
Anita P Bobade, Kasturi R Naik
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-3

Abstract:
Objective: Since December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic has posed a considerable threat with its associated high mortality, infection, and hazard of physical, mental, emotional, financial, and spiritual stress (WHO, 2020). A large number of students are affected due to a chronic break from classroom academic activities, the pressure of being hired for an internship or final placement and staying at home. The main focus of this learning is to know the stressors of graduate and post-graduate Indian students and their major hurdles during the COVID-19 lockdown. Further, the study aims to facilitate a proposed model of training, by combining 7 psychosocial variables of emotional resilience which might empower the students to cater to stressors and improve personal, academic, and professional effectiveness (Chen et.al, 2020; Horesh et.al, 2020) Methods: Using a convenience method, an internet survey of the 6-item COVID-19 Student Stress Questionnaire (CSSQ) (modified version Zurlo et.al, 2020) was conducted on students across India. together with their demographic details, the participants also reported their study patterns and challenges during their confinement period. The statistical scores for the responses were calculated and also the demographic variables were analyzed using the factor analysis technique. (Ahorsu et. al,2020) Findings, Discussion, and implications: The findings suggest that self-awareness, self-regulation, mental agility, optimism, self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and psychological safety may be the important emotional resilience to be developed among the Indian students to cope with physical, mental, emotional, financial, and spiritual stressors confronted by them during COVID 19 pandemic to increase personal and professional effectiveness (Maria et.al, 2020, Zurlo et.al. 2017) Conclusion: The study has several practical implications for counselling psychologists, academicians, parents, life coaches handling youth and mental health workers related to the graduate and post-graduate education sector (Taylor et.al, 2020; Sahu et.al, 2020).
Antoine Trad, Ibistm. France
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-4

Abstract:
This article analyses the role of Global Education System (GES) and proposes the Applied Holistic Mathematical Model for GES (AHMM4GES). The AHMM4GES is based on many years of research on business & educational transformations, Artificial Intelligence (AI), applied mathematics, software modelling, business & organizational engineering, skills & educational systems, financial analysis, security and enterprise architecture. The used research methodology is based on the author’s authentic mixed research method that is supported by a mainly qualitative reasoning module. AHMM4GES’s formalism mimics the human brain, by using empirical processes that are based on heuristics. The AHMM4GES is used to implement a decision-making system (or an expert system) to support a GES and uses a behaviour-driven development environment that can be easily adopted by any organization. The development environment can be used by any team member without any prior computer sciences qualifications. The AHMM4GES is used to estimate the Role of AI based Security in GES’s (RAISGES) context and tries to estimate the roles of the giants in this domain, like the USA, China, and India; and what would be the real role of the European Union and France. The uniqueness and originality of this research is that the AHMM4GES promotes a holistic unbundling process, the alignment of transformation strategies to support GES’ evolution. For a successful integration of AHMM4GES in projects, the manager’s profile, education, skills and role are crucial, where his decisions are supported by the selection, implementation and processing of critical success factors. The main implication is a systemic approach that is the optimal to integrate an RAI4GES.
Palto Datta, David M J Graves
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-5

Abstract:
Due to increased demand for quality education worldwide, the Higher education sector globally has been undergoing an unprecedented level of changes over the past several decades. These result in increased public expectations towards the institutions’ provision, new tasks and responsibilities for scholars and administrators, new modes of knowledge production and transfer. The abundance of individual and organisational change processes requires higher education institutions to rethink the quality of their provision in higher education. This study aims to examine the importance of the Fundamental of Quality Assurance of Higher Education Sector and the influence of a short training programme on quality assurance in developing excellence in education. Micro-CQAP (micro compass quality assurance programme) provides direction and focus that is based on evidence, appraisal, and experience. The study is based on the recent venture by the authors of this study providing a 5-days training programme to Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Maritime University (BSMRMU) and its impact on their overall quality assurance system within the university. The outcome of the training programme and findings of this study suggest that a short training programme on quality assurance within the institution enhances the overall understanding of Quality Assurance and help to implement it in practice more effectively and efficiently. The short programme was based on providing basic knowledge about what quality in higher education is, where it comes from, why quality assurance should & must be carried out, and how the process can be set up and managed at Higher Education institutions. This study is original as it was based on the experience, observations and feedback received after conducting the training programme from the participants. It has significant implications for the bother Higher Education Institutions, Government, and various stakeholders in Bangladesh.
Yilin Huang, Sohani Gandhioke
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 08; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v08n01/art-6

Abstract:
To solve the problem of Chinese EFL students’ passive and ineffective vocabulary learning, task-based language teaching (TBLT) methods were introduced to English classes at a university. With TBLT, students interacted with each other by using English, especially English words learnt, in order to fulfil the tasks designed by teachers. Based on second language acquisition theories, students were able to understand input and produce output during this process. This paper focuses on using TBLT in English vocabulary teaching in three non-English major classes of a Chinese university, involving the use of some word games. The word games’ features, organization, and a skill set built through those games, will be discussed. In terms of methodology, an online questionnaire survey was conducted among 93 university students from the three classes. Also, results of the students’ before-task and after-task word quizzes on Moodle platform and exam paper results were analysed. The research findings showed that students enjoyed playing word games in the English class and benefitted from it, in terms of language development and building skills. This paper recommends teachers to use TBLT in English vocabulary teaching and learning, as it is practical and can assist in EFL learners’ vocabulary acquisition.
J. Sumedha Jayaweera, Karunathilake. K, Susima Weligamage
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 07; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n02/art-2

Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the literature on the professional development of educational administrators in the world, based on empirical and theoretical evidence with special reference to educational administrators and school principals in several countries. Design/Methodology: An interpretative analysis on literature covering professional development, pre-service training, in-service training programmes, mentoring, models of education leaders, coaching and the history of education in Sri Lanka and also the background information of the Education Administrative Service in Sri Lanka is carried out. Findings: Training and professional development date back to several centuries and it was found that the influence of imperialists, mainly the British was dominant in the Sri Lankan modern education system and professional development programmes. Sri Lanka continues to implement training and development with the least changes in contents and scopes compared to the past. It was further found that authorities paid little attention to the effectiveness of the training and development but rather were concerned about the compliance requirements. At present, education leaders undergo training programmes, and improvements in leaders are also seen at varying degrees. The study finds that educational leaders who are good at leadership skills and competencies produce better results in terms of both students’ performances and school management. However, though the use of technology in training was trivial, the need for more sophisticated, comprehensive, and sustainable training for educational leaders for better performance is highlighted. Practical implications: Provision of training and development is perceived by authorities as a practice and not as a key driver of improving school performance and effective management. The outcome of the study can be used to further enhance and implement professional development and training programmes for educational leaders with an outcome-oriented approach. Therefore, the findings will help lay a foundation for policymaking and their implementation can be broadened to enhance the quality of education in Sri Lanka.
Evangelia Fragouli
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 07; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n02/art-3

Abstract:
Internationalized curriculum development is critical to all institutions aiming to approach internationalisation coherently. Research on the internationalisation of the curriculum (IoC) focuses on the curriculum concept encompassing all aspects of learning and teaching (Kemmis & Fitzclarence, 1991). It works at formal, hidden and informal levels. The present work is a critical review of a research piece opinion by Sue Robson (2015) ‘Internationalisation of the Curriculum: Challenges and opportunities’ emphasising the contribution to this matter of the Higher Education Academy (HEA internationalisation framework but also showing what is missing and needs to take place concluding that a more comprehensive framework would have better-added value for internationalising higher education
Georgina Asi Owusu, Rev. Isaac Barfi Sarbeng, Paul Kwesi Mensah, Bernice Owusu Sekyere, Nancy Oduro Asabere, Raphael P. K. Andoh
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 07; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n02/art-4

Abstract:
This paper sought to find out the reasons why in the view of faculty members and officers, some academic Deans in public universities are ineffective leaders. Faculty members and officers of some faculties and schools in University of Cape Coast were requested to first say why in their view; some Deans in University of Cape Coast turn out to be ineffective leaders. Second, they were also requested to give their views on the consequences of leadership failure. Using a qualitative design, the investigators sampled eight (8) faculty members and four (4) faculty officers purposively from four Faculties in University of Cape Coast. Interviewees were asked to consider their own Deans first. A thematic narrative analysis was used to analyse data from the interviews and reported. The results showed that Deans fail due to poor posture, poor interpersonal skill, unclear vision and direction and communication failure. The paper has shown that the consequences of a Dean’s failure affect individual members within the faculty, and create disaffection thus, affecting organisational output. It was therefore recommended that the University Council and Management should consider reviewing the current policy of voting deans into office if it even calls for amendments in the 2016 Statute of the University.
Evangelia Fragouli
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 07; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n02/art-1

Abstract:
The quality of postgraduate education largely depends on effective supervision of postgraduate students. Nowadays, the supervisory role has become more challenging due to different ethnic, cultural, political, economic, linguistic, and educational backgrounds of postgraduate students where their attraction and retention are paramount for educational institutions. Students’ satisfaction balancing studies and other interest is also important during their postgraduate learning experience and supervision is challenged to assist towards this direction as well. Literature about postgraduate supervision has focused on describing the ever-lengthening lists of functions that must be carried out. The present study, through a critical literature review methodology and reflection upon personal practice, explores how postgraduate supervisors can support & engage students with their studies balancing other demands and interests, what are the challenges supervising international students, and how, the supervisory team can manage internal conflicts, function better and more efficiently. The key conclusions show that facilitating development of skills important for students’ ’studies and lives, bridging studies and other demands /interests together, rewarding students’ success, responding to cultural and educational differences & personal interests, and finding ways all members of the supervisory team to work more effectively can lead to more efficient and effective postgraduate supervision.
Veronica Udeogalanya
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n01/art-1

Abstract:
Academic Success, Graduation Rates, Students, Teaching, Undergraduate Education All students who enroll have success as their main goal. However, most institutions focus their resources on programs for students on honor roll, Dean’s list and those progressing academically. Little resources remain for those students who stumble. In 2015, 36.2% of white students, 22.5% of black students, and 15.5% of Hispanic students had completed four years of college. This shows a 13.7% gap between black and white students and a 20.7% gap between Hispanic and white students (Wellman, 2017). How do we close this gap in educational completion? This study believes that all students can learn. Consequently, there needs to be educational equity and the development of a basis for instruction and assessment of all students’ learning outcomes. This paper represents an exploratory fundamental and qualitative research that aims to present a refocus on the role of faculty in teaching and learning to reach all students in classrooms. It examines a holistic and collaborative approach to increasing student success using evidence -based qualitative analysis of best practices. This approach has four component parts. Part 1 is the Holistic Component that involves engaging all students in the institution; communicating purposefully to them in a timely manner; and providing all-inclusive comprehensive support services (HC). This part develops and implements measurable benchmarks that motivate, encourage, and enable all students. Part 2 is the Collaborative Component which involves bringing six working teams together: faculty, industry, current majors, alumni, career services, and the community (CC). This part engages the team in maintaining a living curriculum that reflects the ever-changing global economy. Part 3 is Celebration of Student Success (CSS) which entails the collaborative team owning each milestone, reaffirming teamwork while building trust and persistence. Part 4 is the Assessment of Student Progress (ASP) using the holistic and collaborative approach. The paper concludes that holistic and collaborative teamwork that includes, respects, and empowers all students is the key to reducing the college completion gaps that exist among blacks and Hispanic students. Adelman, C. (2006). The Toolbox revisited: Paths to degree completion from high school though college. U.S. Department of Education. Washington, D.C: Office of Vocational and Adult Education. American College Testing Program (ACT) 2006. Anoopkumar, M., & Rahman, A. M. J. M. Z. (2016). A Review on Data Mining techniques and factors used in Educational Data Mining to predict student amelioration. In 2016 International Conference on Data Mining and Advanced Computing (SAPIENCE), (pp. 122–133). 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Desalegn Sherkabu Abadama
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n01/art-3

Abstract:
Perception, leadership styles, organizational effectiveness, public university, higher education, the university community, leadership levels This study aimed at comparing (i) the perceived ratings of leaders', non-leaders' and students' on leadership effectiveness and (ii) perceived ratings of various levels of leadership against transformational, transactional; and passive avoidant dimensions of leadership using a pragmatist philosophy and a quantitative-qualitative, concurrent, mixed cross-sectional descriptive design. Addis Ababa University (AAU), Debre Berhan University (DBU), and Welkite University (WKU) were randomly selected from each of the three-generation Ethiopian public universities. This study was conducted based on original primary data collected from a total of 506 respondents who filled the survey. These included 333 students and 35 teachers; and 5 top, 16 middle, and 34 lower-level- leaders; and 49 non-leaders among the academic; and 4 top, 5 middle, and 7 lower-level- leaders among administrative staff; and 18 others. About 19 interviewees and 3 FGDS were made. A comprehensive LS and LE questionnaire were adapted, besides in-depth interviews, observation, and document analyses. Each respondent rated his/her immediate supervisor. Descriptive and inferential statistics and ANOVA were employed with corresponding tests of hypotheses. The data proved LS midway between transactional and laissez-faire (MD= 2.5) in the five-point scale. The findings included a moderate score of (M=2.73) for administrative staff middle level leaders and (M=3.37) for top-level academic leaders. Further, LS and LE scores varied favoring ratings made by the academic leadership of the top-level across the hierarchy implying ineptitude. Students' and faculties' and administrative staffs' satisfaction, and LS effectiveness were only found slightly above average. Transactional (TRNAL) rather than transformational LS prevailed in the universities. Findings had several practical implications and because of this MoSHE, the boards and the leadership of the universities and future researchers were advised to take their share Anderson J. C., and Gerbing DW (1988) Structural equation modeling in practice: A review and recommended two-step approach. Psychological Bulletin 103(3): 411–423. Armstrong, M. (2006). Strategic Human Resource Management A Guide to Action 10th Edition. London, Kogan Pages. Avolio, B. A., Bass, Bernard (1985). Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire: Instrument (Leader and Rater Form) and Scoring Guide (Form 5X-Short), Mind Garden, Inc. Avolio, B., Bass, Bernard (1995, 2002, 2004). Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire: Instrument (Leader and Rater Form) and Scoring Guide (Form 5X-Short), Mind Garden, Inc. 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Evangelia Fragouli
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n01/art-4

Abstract:
Internationalization, Higher education, teaching philosophy, culture, learning Internationalised curriculum development is critical to any institution aiming to approach internationalisation in a coherent way. Research on Internationalisation of the Curriculum (IoC), emphasizes the notion of curriculum as encompassing all aspects of learning and works at formal, hidden, and informal levels. The Higher Education Academy (HEA) developed a framework approaching internationalization of teaching, learning & curriculum. Rachel Scudamore, in the guide Engaging Home and International Students, examined the relationship of culture & learning, based on the ‘practical theory’ of Handal & Lauvas (1987), providing useful information and suggestions that informs teaching philosophy. The present work, through critical literature review, reflects upon the HEA framework and Handal & Lauvas’ practical theory, showing new challenges and issues of concerns. It provides recommendations for educators ‘why’ and ‘how’ to internationalize curriculum and teaching and concludes that Handal & Lauvas’ work (1987) should continue to shape teaching approach nowadays. Bennett, C. (1986). Comprehensive multicultural education, theory and practice. Boston: Allyn & Bacon Bordogna, C. & Harvey, H.(no date) Reflecting on the HEA’s Internationalising Higher Education Framework, https://my.heacademy.ac.uk/welcome/ Chism, N. V. N. (1998). Developing a philosophy of teaching statement. Essays on Teaching Excellence: Toward the Best. Academy, 9, 1–3. Croucher, K. & Romer, 2007). Inclusivity in Teaching Practice and the Curriculum. Guides for Teaching and Learning in Archaeology. Number 6. Liverpool: Higher Education Academy. De Vita, G. (2001). Learning styles, culture and inclusive instruction in the multicultural classroom: a business and management perspective’. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 38, 165–173. Green, W., & Whitsed, C. (2015). Critical Perspectives on Internationalising the Curriculum in Disciplines. NL: Sense Publishers Green, W., & Whitsed, C. (2013). Reflections on an alternative approach to continuing professional learning for internationalisation of the curriculum across disciplines. Journal of Studies in Introducing Critical Perspectives on Internationalising the Curriculum 21 International Education: Special Issue, Internationalisation of the Curriculum, and the Disciplines, 17(2), 148–164 Egron-Polak, E., & Hudson, R. (2014). Internationalization of Higher Education: Growing expectations, fundamental values. Paris: IAU. Gay, G. (2002). Preparing for culturally responsive teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 53: 106. Hofstede, G. (2001) Culture’s consequences (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Kreber, C. (2001). Designing teaching portfolios based on a formal model of the scholarship of teaching. In D. Lieberman & C. Wehlburg (Eds.), To improve the academy (19, 285-305). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company Kolb, D.A. (1984) Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Leask, B. (2009). Using formal and informal curricula to improve interactions between home and international students. Journal of Studies in International Education, 13(2), 205–221. Leask, B. (2013). Internationalising the curriculum in the disciplines – Imagining new possibilities. Journal of Studies in International Education: Special Issue, Internationalisation of the Curriculum, and the Disciplines, 17(2), 103–118. Leask, B., & Bridge, C. (2013). Comparing internationalisation of the curriculum in action across disciplines: Theoretical and practical perspectives. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 43(1), 79–101. Morse, K. (2003). Does one size fit all? Exploring asynchronous learning in a multicultural environment., Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 7, 37–55. Paul, B. and Arcodia, C. (2002). Linking learning style preferences and ethnicity: international students studying hospitality and tourism management in Australia’, Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education. 1,15–27. Ramburuth, P. (2001). Cross cultural learning behaviour in higher education: perceptions versus practice, Paper Presented in the Proceedings of the Seventh International Literacy and Education Research Network (LERN) Conference on Learning, RMIT University, Melbourne, 5–9 July 2000, Available at: http://ultibase rmit edu.au/Articles/may01/ramburuth1.htm. Trowler, P., & Cooper, A. (2002). Teaching and learning regimes: Implicit theories and recurrent practice in the enhancement of teaching and learning through educational programmes. Higher Education Research & Development, 21(3), 221–240. Zeichner, K. & Liston, D.P. (2011). Reflective teaching: An introduction. NY: Routledge
Nika Levikov, Daniela Quacinella, Edward Duca
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v07n01/art-2

Abstract:
Collaboration, Fragmentation, Engagement, Responsible Research and Innovation Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) has recently gained recognition as a guiding principle for research to be more inclusive of societal needs. In response, the University of Malta led an internal qualitative study to assess attitudes and perceptions towards RRI. This approach paved the way for cultural and institutional changes that may not have developed otherwise. Academics, non-academic staff and students were interviewed alongside an online questionnaire totaling 29 face-to-face interviews and 226 survey responses. Thematic coding analysis revealed the core theme of fragmentation. Sub-themes stemming from fragmentation include challenges around collaboration, communication, politics, knowledge systems thinking and varied ideas of responsibility in research. While most respondents are in favor of RRI practice, several barriers affect an individual’s capacity to practice this approach, including lack of time and resources, and lack of recognition of public engagement (PE) efforts in the university’s current policies and governance structure. This research allowed for the development of a targeted Action Plan and set of initiatives to successfully begin implementing a culture of RRI best practice, including the establishment of the Committee for Engaged Research and fostering an internal network of individuals who are exemplary in RRI best practice. The thorough and targeted process has produced more significant and tangible results than moving directly into implementation, while also reducing the risk of future problems emerging from rushed initiatives. The authors conclude that such an approach is imperative for successful RRI implementation within institutions, especially when considering cultural/local context. 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Locating far-right movements in and beyond Malta. Journal of Contemporary European Studies, 16(3), pp.393–406. Felt, U. (2017). “Response-able practices” or “new bureaucracies of virtue”: the challenges of making RRI work in academic environments. Responsible Innovation, 3, pp. 49–68. Fereday, J. and Muir-Cochrane, E. (2006). Demonstrating Rigor Using Thematic Analysis: A Hybrid Approach of Inductive and Deductive Coding and Theme Development. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 5(1). Forsberg, E.M., Shelley-Egan, C., Ladikas, M. and Owen R. (2018). Implementing Responsible Research and Innovation in Research Funding and Research Conducting Organizations—What Have We Learned so Far? Governance and Sustainability of Responsible Research and Innovation Processes, pp. 3–11. Fransman, J., Newman, K. and Cornish, H. (2017). Rethinking Research Partnerships: Discussion Guide and Toolkit. Gerber, A. (2018). RRI: How to ‘mainstream’ the ‘upstream’ engagement. Journal of Science Communication, 17(3), C06. Grimpe, C. and Hussinger, K. (2013). Formal and informal knowledge and technology transfer from academia to industry: Complementarity effects and innovation performance. Industry and innovation, 20(8), pp.683–700. Grinbaum, A. and Groves, C. (2013). What Is “Responsible” about Responsible Innovation? Understanding the Ethical Issues. Responsible Innovation: Managing the Responsible Emergence of Science and Innovation in Society, (April 2013), pp. 119–142. Government of Malta (2020). About: The Maltese Islands. Available at: http://www.gov.mt [Accessed 09 February 2020]. Hart, A., Davies, C., Aumann, K., Wenger, E., Aranda, K., Heaver, B. and Wolff, D. (2013). Mobilising knowledge in community-university partnerships: what does a community of practice approach contribute? Contemporary Social Science: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences, 8(3), pp. 278–291. Kupper, F., Klaassen, P., Rijnen, M., Vermeulen, S., Woertman R. and Broerse, J. (2015). A catalogue of good RRI practices (types, agendas and...
David Ahlstrom, Linda C. Wang
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v06n02/art-1

Abstract:
Academic journals, paper organization, publishing, research, writing Publishing research in quality academic journals is always challenging. To improve the odds of publishing in the better business and allied social science journals, an author needs to get the paper off to a good start. To do that, much attention should be devoted to the paper’s introduction. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the introduction of some exemplary articles in the social sciences, primarily in the management and international business areas, and contrast those with some problematic examples. This research draws on a purposive sample and presents three of the exemplary article introductions for detailed discussion. Structural problems with the introduction are a major reason why otherwise good research can immediately run into problems with editors and reviewers. Thus, this paper contributes in providing guidance to authors in writing and organizing their introductions, from which they can also better organize and develop their full manuscripts and increase the odds of papers being accepted by good scholarly journals. Additional helpful examples and sources for authors are also provided and discussed
Evangelia Fragouli
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v06n02/art-2

Abstract:
Internationalization curriculum, students, higher education, business studies Institutions of higher education have placed increasing importance on internationalizing their curricula over the past 10 years. The present work, through application of literature review and review of the Higher Education Framework for internationalization, presents a critical reflection of the challenges addressed in order a curriculum in Higher Education to be internationalized and provides a practical guide regarding the required steps that need to be followed. The example of internationalizing a business management curriculum is used in this study. The above assist educational leaders and educational decision makers to understand what is important to be considered when they plan, organize, design and implement activities for internationalizing a curriculum. The study also challenges that a more comprehensive framework is needed towards internationalization and through reflection upon personal experience provides practical guidance and recommendations to academics and educators how HE curricula can become international in context and in practice
Palto Datta, Mark T. Jones, Uk Centre For Innovative Leadership Navigation
International Journal of Higher Education Management, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.24052/ijhem/v05n01/art05

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