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Results in Journal BMC Palliative Care: 1,214

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Pilot And Feasibility Studies
Published: 10 October 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0233-9

, Hsiu-Ling Shih, Li-Fen Wu, Yu-Chun Hung, Chi-Ming Chu, Kwua-Yun Wang
Published: 17 August 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16, pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0228-6

Abstract:
The Taiwanese government has promoted palliative care consultation services (PCCS) to support terminally ill patients in acute ward settings to receive palliative care since 2005. Such an intervention can enhance the quality of life and dignity of terminally ill patients. However, research focusing on the relationship between the knowledge, attitude and practice of a PCCS using path modelling in nursing staff is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude and practice toward PCCS in Taiwanese nursing staff. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study design using convenience sampling. Data collected included demographics, knowledge, attitude and practice as measured by the PCCS inventory (KAP-PCCSI). Two hundred and eighty-four nursing staff from a medical center in northern Taiwan participated in the study in 2013. We performed descriptive statistics, regression analysis, and path modeling using SPSS 19.0 and set p < 0.05 as the statistical significance threshold. The results showed that the identical factor significantly associated with knowledge, attitude, and practice toward PCCS among nurses was the frequency of contact with PCCS. In addition, higher level of knowledge toward PCCS was associated with working in haematology and oncology wards, and participation in education related to palliative care. A more positive attitude toward PCCS was associated with working in a haematology and oncology ward, and experience of friends or relatives dying. Higher level of practice toward PCCS was associated with nurses who participated in education related to palliative care. In the path modeling, we found that holders of a master’s degree indirectly positive affected practice toward PCCS. Possession of a bachelor degree or above, being single, working within a haematology and oncology ward, and frequency of contact with PCCS positively affected practice toward PCCS. Based on this study, it is proposed that consultation with PCCS has a positive impact on the care of terminally ill patients. Encouragement of staff to undertake further education can improve the practice of ward staff providing palliative care.
, Jolien M. Hofstede, Anke J. E. De Veer, Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Anneke L. Francke
Published: 16 August 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16, pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0224-x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 25 July 2002
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 1, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-684x-1-4

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Quality end-of-life care has emerged as an important concept in industrialized countries. DISCUSSION: We argue quality end-of-life care should be seen as a global public health and health systems problem. It is a global problem because 85 % of the 56 million deaths worldwide that occur annually are in developing countries. It is a public health problem because of the number of people it affects, directly and indirectly, in terms of the well being of loved ones, and the large-scale, population based nature of some possible interventions. It is a health systems problem because one of its main features is the need for better information on quality end-of-life care. We examine the context of end-of-life care, including the epidemiology of death and cross-cultural considerations. Although there are examples of success, we could not identify systematic data on capacity for delivering quality end-of-life care in developing countries. We also address a possible objection to improving end-of-life care in developing countries; many deaths are preventable and reduction of avoidable deaths should be the focus of attention. CONCLUSIONS: We make three recommendations: (1) reinforce the recasting of quality end-of-life care as a global public health and health systems problem; (2) strengthen capacity to deliver quality end-of-life care; and (3) develop improved strategies to acquire information about the quality of end-of-life care.
Pascale Vinant, the INSIGHT investigators, Ingrid Joffin, Laure Serresse, Sophie Grabar, Hélène Jaulmes, Malika Daoud, Gabriel Abitbol, Pascale Fouassier, Isabelle Triol, et al.
Published: 30 May 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0209-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Spa-Ltc the SPA-LTC Team, Tamara Sussman, M. Bui, N. Akhtar-Danesh, R. D. Laporte, L. McCleary, A. Wickson Griffiths, K. Brazil, , et al.
Published: 18 May 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16, pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0207-y

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 23 March 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0194-z

Abstract:
Specialised palliative care (SPC) takes place in specialised services for patients with complex symptoms and problems. Little is known about what determines the admission of patients to SPC and whether there are differences in relation to institution type. The aims of the study were to investigate whether cancer patients’ admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark who died from cancer in 2010–2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. In the study population (N = 44,548) the overall admittance proportion to SPC was 37%. Higher odds of overall admittance to SPC were found for women (OR = 1.23; 1.17–1.28), younger patients (<40 compared with 80+ years old) (OR = 6.44; 5.19–7.99) and patients with sarcoma, pancreatic and stomach cancers, whereas the lowest were for patients with haematological malignancies. The higher admission found for women was most pronounced for hospices compared to hospital-based palliative care teams/units, whereas higher admission of younger patients was more pronounced for hospital-based palliative care teams/units. Patients with brain cancer were more often admitted to hospices, whereas patients with prostate cancer were more often admitted to hospital-based palliative care teams/units. It is unlikely that the variations in relation to sex, age and cancer diagnoses can be fully explained by differences in need. Future research should investigate whether the groups having the lowest admittance to SPC receive sufficient palliative care elsewhere.
Correction
Karin Zimmermann, Eva Bergstraesser, Sandra Engberg, Anne-Sylvie Ramelet, Katrin Marfurt-Russenberger, Nicolas Von Der Weid, Chantal Grandjean, Patricia Fahrni-Nater,
Published: 17 February 2017
BMC Palliative Care, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12904-017-0188-x

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