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Results in Journal The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development: 49

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Ratna Budiarti, Moh. Nurhadi
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.39-50

Abstract:
What and why transportation, climate change, and gender are connected? What is the implication of transportation policy, program and plan (PPP) to gender equality and vice versa? This article aimed to construct it in the context of urban transportation in Semarang City where transportation contributes more than 50% of GHG emissions. This research investigated the relation of transportation, climate change, and gender by interviewing and exploring transportation users through a multistage random sampling. The respondents are divided into urban zones namely inner, suburb, and outskirt with a balanced number of men and women respondents in order to give equal information. The results showed three interesting findings. First, women and men have different travel patterns. Women’s preference for travelling implies more efficient energy consumption. Second, women have a higher dependency on public transport than men due to their limited transportation access (ownership and use). At the household level, men have a dominant role in determining transportation mode, type, and ownership of private vehicles. It influences the choice of transportation mode and the way women ride vehicle. Third, the differences of travel pattern and transportation between men and women implied to GHG emissions contribution. Participation of women in the design of transportation policy, program, and the plan will give a better impact on the transportation system and climate change as well as for women access to transportation.
Ratna Budiarti, Moh. Nurhadi
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.40-51

Abstract:
What and why transportation, climate change, and gender are connected? What is the implication of transportation policy, program and plan (PPP) to gender equality and vice versa? This article aimed to construct it in the context of urban transportation in Semarang City where transportation contributes more than 50% of GHG emissions. This research investigated the relation of transportation, climate change, and gender by interviewing and exploring transportation users through a multistage random sampling. The respondents are divided into urban zones namely inner, suburb, and outskirt with a balanced number of men and women respondents in order to give equal information. The results showed three interesting findings. First, women and men have different travel patterns. Women’s preference for travelling implies more efficient energy consumption. Second, women have a higher dependency on public transport than men due to their limited transportation access (ownership and use). At the household level, men have a dominant role in determining transportation mode, type, and ownership of private vehicles. It influences the choice of transportation mode and the way women ride vehicle. Third, the differences of travel pattern and transportation between men and women implied to GHG emissions contribution. Participation of women in the design of transportation policy, program, and the plan will give a better impact on the transportation system and climate change as well as for women access to transportation.
, Puji Astuti
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.27-38

Abstract:
Malay Riau culture is the root of life for measure point and rules in the developmentsettlement on Siak Sri Indrapura City. The settlement in Siak Sri Indrapura City ischaracterized by the activity of the traditional community. However, the city developmentand the lack of government policy support threatening the sustainability of traditionalsettlements as well as Malay culture. This study aims to give the recommendation about theconcept of development of the heritage settlements in Siak. The research method used isboth qualitative and quantitative analysis through the backlog, layout, and internal-externalanalysis. The analysis results point out that the policy of modern Malay residential areadevelopment is urgently needed to develop and protect the heritage settlements in Siak SriIndrapura City. The appropriate policies is by improving and maintaining the values of Malaycultural heritage in residential building and build an integrated transportation network toincrease the functional values as a residence, economic, and tourism.
, Emirhadi Suganda
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.11-18

Abstract:
Water governance is critical for water security and as enabling condition to achieve urban resilience. Water governance involves multi-actor, multi-sector and multi-level. Water governance system is the foundation for all stakeholders involved in water management in urban areas. Clarity of roles and responsibilities of each actor and coordination at all levels can help to meet the goals of urban water security to be more efficient, effective and inclusive. This article highlights the current water governance in a metropolitan area with level analysis on policy, organizational and operational. This is a multidisciplinary perspective of environmental science and public policy. Bandung Metropolitan Area (BMA) is chosen as a case study. Data and information gathered from secondary sources. The output is an initial baseline of water governance in BMA including key factors shaping water governance and role of stakeholder. This result will be used for the further research on dynamic and adaptive governance on the urban water sector.
Fitriawati Fitriawati, Djoko Santoso Abi Suroso
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.19-26

Abstract:
Climate change affects the uncertainty of oceanographic condition that has an impact on the marine fisheries, such as changes in fishing areas, winds, and extreme waves. As an archipelagic country, the majority of Indonesian cities are in the coastal area whose the community’s livelihood depends on marine fishery activities. Climate change impacts the coastal community who engages in fishery activities are now being vulnerable group towards climate change. This condition is also experienced by fishermen in Muncar District, the second biggest fishery port in Indonesia. It is necessary to enhance fishermen household’s adaptive capacity which is the key to region’s resilience. This research focuses on adaptive capacity assessment by formulating criteria and indicators based on the expert's theories review. The method that is used in this research is statistic descriptive based on a questionnaire which distributed to 120 households samples. This research also views perception of fishermen on climate change impacts and on how Local Government Units (LGUs) and Community Organizations (COs)support the increase of fishermen household’s adaptive capacity. The result of the assessment showed that 56% of households have ‘medium’ adaptive capacity, 34% of them are in ‘low’ adaptive capacity, and 10% households are in ‘high’ adaptive capacity. The LGUs and COs gives a high endorsement to households to increase their adaptive capacity. The result of this study can be taken into consideration in formulating the strategies to enhance fishermen household’s adaptive capacity in order to realize the resilient fishermen households socially and economically.
Roosmayri Lovina Hermaputi, Chen Hua
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.1.1-10

Abstract:
These years China's cities faced urban water security problem caused by natural disaster, man-made disaster, and water shortage. Back to the year 2002 until 2015 several cases were raised such as 2002 Guizhou Duyun slag water pollution, 2014 Lanzhou water benzene poisoning cases and the Han River Excessive Ammonia Pollution in Wuhan, Gansu Hui County blood cadmium poisoning cases. Meanwhile, a rainstorm hit Guangzhou in May 2010, Nanjing rainstorm 7.18, and recently Beijing 7.21 big rainstorm who killed about 79 people and Changsha 4.7 big flood in 2015. The "Sponge City" is the answer for China's water issues. Recorded In October 2013 Professor Lin Bingzhang recommend to build a "sponge city" as storm events and flood mitigation action, then in December, Secretary-General Xi Jinping at the central work conference on urbanisation talked about building a natural reservoir, natural infiltration, natural purification "sponge city." Followed the initiative, "Sponge City Construction Technology Guide - Low Impact Development Storm water system builders" had been released in 2014, project financing policy "Finance Building [2014] No. 838" has been established and until the year 2016, 30 cities has been chosen as sponge city urban construction pilot. The sponge city initiative aims to maximise water reservation and minimise the effects of drought and flooding by recycling and efficiently applying water supplies and reserves (AUSTRADE, 2016). This paper tries to elaborate the Sponge City theory and review of several practices in China's cities to create urban water resilience. This research will conduct theory development analysis, sponge city construction's practices analysis and its performance to actualize urban water resilience.
, Neil Tanquilu
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.1-10

Abstract:
Community and industry engagement by universities and academics are sometimes prone to accusations of exclusive or academic ‘talk-fests’ which can reinforce rather than resolve the ‘bridgeable disconnect’ between the general community and particular organizations with vested interests (Grayson, 2010). Concrete modes and strategies of ‘linking knowledge to action’ are needed to build upon the participatory exchange or mediation of stakeholder perspectives and interests. This paper reports on the exploration, development and application of the kind of convergent and also interdisciplinary approach to development studies which might: (a) better link theory and practice as a basis for the elusive goal of strategic ‘sustainability’, and (b) also encourage and optimize authentic, collaborative, and complex modes of problem-solving as a key to community and industry engagement by academic institutions and researchers. It will do so in relation to some practical case studies in such partnerships.
Deni Bram
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.35-42

Abstract:
This note focuses on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD), an international framework that aims to curb carbon emissions by reducing deforestation. Meanwhile international negotiators discuss the environmental benefits of REDD, which will likely be implemented in the Kyoto Protocol's post-2012 commitment period. Indonesia as one of countries with a high rate of deforestation and has large number of tropical forests of course become the main actor in REDD regime. Indonesia policy regarding REDD+ is the first come to response it in the regulation scope. Nowadays Indonesia has a lot of REDD+ project that based on voluntary approach and some of them are already finished. This condition makes the legitimacy of REDD+ regime in Indonesia to be questioned and seemed play in grey area because there is no legally binding formulation about REDD+ in international area but already exist in Ministry of Forestry level. This paper will emphasize some of the main issues related to REDD+ in international and Indonesia context. Firstly, the background on the adoption concept of REDD+ in international discourse and the debate from developed and developing countries perspective about it. Secondly, trace the basic legitimacy of REDD+ implementation in Indonesia based on regulations and stakeholder was involved in REDD+ project. Lastly, the response that should be done from the clearly position of REDD+ in Indonesia. This response was in order to encourage the legitimation of legal instrument and legal institution that can accommodate the implementation of REDD+ projects in Indonesia. This paper will also to conducting REDD+ national concept by doing the lessons learnt on other forest state national policy. The conclusion of this paper can provide a clear position on the implementation of REDD+ in Indonesia starting from the validity of the existing legal policies until give optional model for others countries.
, Achmad Djunaedi, Bakti Setiawan, Leksono Subanu
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.11-18

Abstract:
Recently, many planners apply collaborative planning theory in planning involving two or more parties, such as between government, private and community, including in the interregion cooperation. However, the theory has rarely been used to explain the interaction between regions in city border area, especially in the cases in Indonesia. This article discusses the case of cross-border service of water supply of the Local Water Company (PDAM-Perusahaan Daerah Air Minum) of Surakarta City into the urban border area of Sukoharjo Regency, based on collaborative planning theory. This article is written based on results of the research on the case using case study research method. The discussion concludes that the approach of collaborative planning theory used on the case is cooperative-accommodation approach. It is because PDAM of Surakarta City accommodate the cross-border region service as a reciprocal policy, as most of their water inputs come from their neighboring regions. In general, such an approach is in accordance with the need of the interacting regions, which one region needs supporting service to meet the need of their communities in water service, and another can fulfill the need based on its capacity. In this case, the concerned technical agencies, PDAM of every region interact each other directly in providing the service. The important thing, the interaction is in line with the prevailing cross-border region bureaucratic regulations and does not infringe the autonomy of every region.
Dodi Widiyanto, R. Rijanta, Toekidjo Toekidjo
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.19-28

Abstract:
It is believed that local food crops are available widely in rural regions. However, not all of the people consume them. The facts also show that local food crops are placed as secondary sources of foodstuff. This research aims at (1) describing the profile of local food crops consumed by the poor rural households and 2) exploring causes and mechanism of the poor rural household in maintaining local food crops as their food sources in the three different geographical regions of Kulon Progo Regency, namely the upland region, the transitional region, and the lowland region of Kulon Progo Regency. A household survey is conducted to achieve the above mentioned objectives. Respondents of this research arechosen purposively from the poor households’ data as listed by the Kulon Progo Regional Planning Board to represent the three regions in the regency. Three districts in the regency are selected to represent the three types of regions respectively, i.e: Samigaluh, Pengasih, and Lendah. A questionnaire is distributed in order to collect the data from the selectedhousehold respondents. The findings of this research are (1) there are various kinds of local food crops that were consumed by the respondents from three different geographical regions. The researchers collected that there were 36 types of local food totally from these three geographical regions, (2) there were also several motives that were important to be described in order to explained the reason why the respondents processed local food crops such as to be sold or to be consumed by themselves, (3) spatially, there are a specific pattern of harvested local food crops based on the respondents perceptions in three geographical areas: (i) based on nature, and (ii) based on human decision , (4) there were also various methods of utilisation local food crops, such as boiled, fried, steamed, cooked into intermediate products, or cooked into final commodities that were ready to be consumed.
Reny Yesiana
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.57-64

Abstract:
Urbanization as a socio-economic change in developing countries has been leading to the existence of a region with a mixture of rural and urban character so called Peri-Urban Areas (PUA). PUA has been emerging as a part of urban growth process as well as rural growth, regarded as rural-urban transition. This phenomenon could be clearly observed in Klaten District, Central Java Province. Located between two strategic cities in Central Java, i.e. Yogyakarta and Surakarta, Klaten has been experiencing a significant land conversion (among the highest in the province) and a significant economic growth in comparison to other districts in the province. Accordingly, Klaten was chosen as the case study to understand the PUA development in Central Java. By focusing on socio-economic perspective, this paper aims to determine PUA typology in Klaten and further analyze the driving factors of the emerging PUA typology. Quantitative analysis using GIS tools and scoring method was applied to create the typology based on secondary socio-economic data taken from statistics report. As the results of the analysis, it has been shown that most of villages in the study area are highly rural in terms of social character. On the contrary, in economic aspect such as employment, the PUA of Klaten community has a strong urban character. It is classified as the fourth typology (highly rural in social character and highly urban in economic character) among the four identified PUA typologies in Klaten. The underlying influential factor of the development of PUA in Klaten is very much its local potential, i.e. the local economic activity. This may provide an evidence that urban and rural growth could be taken place as a part of ‘local’ growth which does not necessarily take place as a part of urban growth (expansion) of the main city (growth center).
, Ema Umilia, Ketut Dewi Martha Erli Handayeni
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.29-34

Abstract:
Population growth is happening in cities, including Surabaya as the second largest metropolitan region in Indonesia. The population growth has an impact to the residential density, whereas residential is usually the largest part of land use in urban areas. In urabaya, residential use covers more than 60% of the total area. The intensive use of residential area has impacts on the environment. One significant issue is the consumption of energy that produces greenhouse gas emissions. This study is aimed at explaining the relationships between residential density and greenhouse gas emissions in Surabaya City, Indonesia. The residential density will be divided into three categories, i.e. low, medium and high density. The category of density is taken from the Identification Report of Surabaya Spatial Plan. The results of this study indicate that there are significant differences in the electrical energy consumption for the household sector in each residential density. These differences are mainly influenced by variables such as car ownership, ventilation system, the use of electrical power, cooking fuel and the way to use the home appliances. The highest total energy consumption per month exists in high density type. Although the average smallest energy consumption per household exists in medium density, the total energy consumption in medium density is much greater than that in the low density because the number of households in medium density is greater. The final result shows that the correlation between the total production of GHG emissions (CO2) and density has a direct or positive relationship, which means that the greater the density, the higher the production rate of GHG emissions (CO2).
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.51-56

Abstract:
One of the important issues emergences in the context of spatial planning is about community participation. In Indonesia, this issue widely spread in line with development of decentralization system and low level of trust to government. In Bali, problem in land management became crucial issue in regard with rocket development of tourism sector. Triangle conflicts among Indigenous Village, State Government and investor became a common things today. Social capital as an instrument of control is absolutely necessary to monitor the implementation of spatial planning. In regard with endogenous concept in contemporary urban planning, and considering the weakness and limitations of current land use control tools this paper discus and propose an idea to enforce the uses of social capital to support and affirm land use control. This paper began with elaboration of the challenges and conflict of land management in Bali, followed by analysis weakness and limitations of existing regulations and finally ends up with an idea to enforce the function of social capital through institutional reform. Based on the discussion, integrating social capital can be done through accommodating the value into concept of spatial planning and involving indigenous village as institution control for the implementation of spatial plan.
, Shahed Khan
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.1.1.43-50

Abstract:
In the context of rising concerns about global warming and sustainable development this paper examines the challenges of landscape architecture (LA) in developing and developed countries in handling climate change adaptation. The paper aims to find how the LA institutes define their professionals’ roles in dealing with society and environment. It seeks to focus on the professionals’ involvement in climate change adaptation programs in Indonesia and Australia. The paper seeks to determine how contextual factors such as institutional roles and types of prevalent governance systems shape the development of landscape architecture discipline and its professional capability with respect to other related built environment professions (architecture and planning). The websites of the ISLA (Indonesian Society of Landscape Architects) and the AILA (Australian Institutes of Landscape Architects) are examined and analysed from the perspective of professional principles of the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA). The aim is to determine the LA practitioners’ awareness and approaches in handling climate change challenges in various roles and capabilities. It has found that the professional institute in Australia has been involved in the educational program to equip their practitioner members to have a basic knowledge and further application of climate change adaptation in their design and planning projects; whereas in Indonesia the practitioners are actively involved in community capacity building to increase people’s awareness and participation in mitigating the climate change at local as well as regional levels. Findings from the study seek to establish the universality of the LA profession and its relevance in both developed and developing countries.
Bintang Septiarani, Reny Yesiana
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 87-94; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.2.87-94

Abstract:
Climate change is no longer seen as a natural process when it has been correlated with human behavior, especially from increasingly rapid development activities. In Semarang, climate change has been affecting people's activity, especially in the coastal area. Coastal communities that depend on coastal resources feel the effects of climate change. Fishers, mangrove farmers, and fishpond farmers are vulnerable groups to the impacts of climate change because the coastal resources in quality and quantity decrease and affect their lives. Stakeholders make efforts through mangroves rehabilitation programs all over the coastal line, including the community approach to increase the mangrove growth rate. However, mangrove seeds planted in Semarang coastal area have different levels of life and growth rate in each planting location. Based on Environmental Agency of Central Java Province data in 2013, 8,594.89 ha of 11,732 ha mangrove vegetation in the North Coast of Central Java Province are in damaged condition. Hence, this paper aims to elaborate on the key factors of community-based mangrove replantation affecting the mangrove growth in the Semarang coastal area. Five mangroves rehabilitation areas in Semarang namely in Kelurahan Mangkang Kulon, Mangkang Wetan, Mangunharjo, Tugurejo and Kelurahan Trimulyo are observed throughout 2015-2016. The results show that suitability between mangrove species and the location is very influential on mangrove growth rates in Semarang Coastal. The community effort in each location also becomes the external factor affecting the growth of mangroves in Semarang Coastal Area. By understanding the factors of mangrove growth rate on the community-based mangrove replantation, better results of mangrove replantation programs can be acquired in the future.
Daniel Nosakhare Onaiwu
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 78-86; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.2.78-86

Abstract:
The spatial structure of modern settlements is organized based on development control. The compliance of urban residents with development control regulations makes it possible for cities to be well structured for physical, aesthetic, and economic developments. The study aims to assess public compliance with development control in Auchi. A sample of 378 residents of Auchi was used in the study. The study area was divided into six strata, and samples were selected from the strata based on their population sizes. The instrument was a 5-point Likert-type option, which was administered to the respondents. The findings revealed that there was low compliance with development control standards in Auchi. There was awareness of developers on compliance but did not translate into compliance. The building coverage specified by development control regulations was grossly violated. There was a medium correlation (0.55) between education and level of non-compliance; the variability of development control non-compliance in the six quarters of Auchi was statistically significant, and the eta squared effect was also large. It was recommended that the town planning regulations be reassessed for a better practical effect; monitoring of developments to encourage compliance should be strengthened; and town planning manuals should be used to monitor and control developments.
Muhammad Suhaili, Ani Widayati, Abdul Fatah
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 58-65; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.2.58-65

Abstract:
An indicator is considered more representative to be used as a benchmark for development, namely the Human Development Index (HDI). The Human Development Index is another alternative to the definition of development that it is not only economic resources as a means to achieve development goals. The government has made various efforts to improve the quality of education to develop quality human resources. One of the components in the education budget is the education budget through transfers to the regions and village funds. Transfers to regions and village funds consist of general allocation funds and special allocation funds. This study aims to examine the effect of the government’s investment in the education sector through the education budget, particularly Special Allocation Funds-Physical (SAF Physical) and Special Allocation Funds-Non-Physical (SAF Non-Physical) on the Human Development Index (HDI). The study consists of two independent variables, i.e., Special Allocation Funds-Physical (SAF Physical) and Special Allocation Funds-NonPhysical (SAF Non-Physical), and one dependent variable: Human Development Index (HDI). The method used is a quantitative method with multiple regression analysis-ordinary least square (OLS). The data used is secondary data from the Central Bureau of Statistics/Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS) in 2010-2018. The results showed that Special Allocation Funds-Physical (SAF Physical) and Special Allocation Funds-Non-Physical (SAF Non-Physical) significantly influence the Human Development Index (HDI). The Special Allocation Funds-Physical (SAF Physical) has a negative and insignificant effect. In contrast, the Special Allocation Funds-Non-Physical (SAF Non-Physical) has a positive and significant effect on the Human Development Index. Therefore, the government is expected to increase educational investment by allocating more budgets on both physical and non-physical investment to improve the quality of Human Resources.
Tresnasari Ratnaningtias,
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 45-57; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.2.45-57

Abstract:
Resilience assessment has been conducted in Semarang City by two different organizations using two different methods, i.e., City Resilience Index (CRI) and Urban Community Resilience Assessment (UCRA) in 2017 and 2018. Based on the result of those resilience assessments, it reveals that some of the resilience indicators are not suitable for local conditions in Semarang City regarding development planning policies. City strategic planning is a mid-term development planning policy with a combination of sectoral planning and comprehensive planning to budgeting process of the local government programs. It also includes local government performance indicators that reflect the level of good governance and lead to enhance city resilience. Hence, indicators in city strategic planning also can be considered as resilience indicators. All of this implies that city strategic planning describes the local government already uses resilience thinking in its strategies, policies, and programs. However, city resilience encompasses many aspects and more complex. This study aims to identify between CRI and UCRA, which method having resilience indicators that are compatible, applicable, and suitable for Semarang’s city strategic planning. CRI and UCRA use different methods and aim at different scopes when assessing resilience in the city. The results of the content analysis on the document of development planning policies, such as the 2016-2021 Semarang’s city strategic planning and Revision of the 2016-2021 Semarang’s city strategic planning, highlight the similarities and differences between CRI and UCRA. It reveals that CRI’s resilience indicators are more compatible, applicable, and suitable for Semarang’s city strategic planning rather than UCRA’s resilience indicators.
Fitria Nucifera, Widiyana Riasasi, , EmilyA Nurjani
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 66-77; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.2.66-77

Abstract:
Climate change has become a global issue over last decades. Its impact affects to various aspects of human life. Uncertainty of dry and wet seasons present a consequence to and create losses on agriculture sector. Therefore, resilience to climate change is necessary for farmers. This research aims to identify exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity within the framework of community resilience to climate change in agricultural sector. Parameters used in this research include rainfall variability representing system exposure, landuse and topography representing sensitivity, and farmer’s knowledge and behavior representing adaptive capacity. Secondary data used in this research are daily rainfall data, land use and topographic maps, while primary data obtained by interview using purposive sampling method to measure adaptive capacity of farmers community. We employ trend, spatial, and descriptive analysis. The results show that Sentolo Subdistrict has a relatively high exposure to extreme events both in wet and dry seasons that occurred 5 times in 12 years. However, this high exposure did not affect agriculture sector on Sentolo significantly, both in terms of damages and losses to farmers. It indicates that the sensitivity to climate change in this area is low, while farmers’ community in Sentolo has a high level of adaptive capacity. They have sufficient level of knowledge to climate change, better adjustment to technology and well-managed assets. This interplay shows that the agricultural community in the study area has a relatively high resilience to climate change.
Clarrio Dimassetya Jaya
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 38-44; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.1.38-44

Abstract:
Tourism escalates the economics in many undeveloped regions. It is more effective than others because the industry creates substantial multiplier effects and stimulates the growth of the local economy. Tourism provides many potential livelihoods to build up the local community's incomes. Global trends influence the growth of tourism. Nowadays, the worlds prefer to experience high-value production of unique commodities than massive tourism product. In Panggang Lake Area, swamp buffalo personify the locality phenomenon. The buffalos successfully adapt to live in a wet swamp, and even they are a good swimmer. Since Banjar Sultanate civilization, the community farms swamp buffalos in Panggang Lake Area. The unique ability of swamp buffalo builds a potency of tourism attraction. For those reasons, The North Upstream Regency plans Panggang Lake Area to be a tourist destination. However, as the germ-plasma sources, the tourism development in Panggang Lake Area should cooperate on some local wisdom. The local community works as a buffalo farmer so that the tourism development would make several changes in the daily life structures. This study aims to find out the most fitted concept of infrastructure development towards agritourism. The importance of socio-economic and environmental factors analyzed study participants' preferences for evaluating the appropriateness of tourism development in Panggang Lake Area. The study concludes the concept of watching tourism to be the more appropriate concept of agritourism infrastructure development in Panggang Lake Area.
Andjar Prasetyo
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 75-79; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.2.75-79

Abstract:
Indonesia's target for using the energy mix through Renewable Energy (RE) is 22.5 percent in 2025. The steps taken are to optimize local energy use for electricity generation and select more efficient technologies that can reduce the cost of electricity supply. One of the pioneers carried out in the city of Magelang is the Smart on Grid Actuator (SOGA) system that converts sunlight into electrical energy. This study aims to calculate and analyze estimated costs by using the sun using SOGA System innovations. The research location in the Research and Development Agency of the City of Magelang focused on cost efficiency testing based on solar energy harvesting with SOGA. The survey on the use of SOGA innovation was conducted during October 2018 to obtain primary data. The approach to the results of previous research and theoretical approaches is intended as a reference, and secondary data complete the analysis of this study. Study analysis uses the Financial and Economic Benefits Photovoltaic Grid-Tied System projection (Utility-Based Rebate Formula). As a result, the SOGA system can reduce installed electricity costs by ± 330 USD per year and can be used for alternative rural energy development.
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 21-29; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.1.21-29

Abstract:
Toll roads play a significant role in regional development. Moreover, toll roads affect the behavioral patterns of the people who reside in the surrounding areas and the region's development. Toll roads improve accessibility to resources that lead to higher productivity and ultimately foster economic growth. This paper aims to examine the difference in household income levels between suburban areas before the construction of Bakauheni–Terbanggi Besar toll road in 2014 and after the toll road construction in 2017. Toll road construction is associated with society's income; the areas closer to the toll road are inclined to have higher income levels. Furthermore, the construction of a toll road creates socio-economic opportunities and improves accessibility for society. This research used an income effect model to develop transformational household changes using the Ordinary Least Square (OLS) Regression. It is discovered that there is a behavioral correlation both in and between the households that leads to shifts in the work sector, income level, health, and education. This research showed that households' income is significantly increased after toll construction. Residential distance from toll also has a strong correlation with income, which households residing closer to the toll road have earned more income than those residing farther.
Adewale O Yoade, Sesan A Adeyemi
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 11-20; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.1.11-20

Abstract:
Environmental decay in a city is essentially caused by rapid urbanization and the mismatch in the provision and maintenance of housing and infrastructure. This study examined challenges of slum upgrading in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The study aims to examine slum areas and their living conditions, and finding out the most critical and problematic zone of the slums Two sources (primary and secondary) of data were utilized in the study: The study population for this study was the residents of Diobu and Waterside in Port Harcourt, River State. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data appropriately. Findings established that 11.3% acquired primary education, 29.0% have secondary education, and 14.0% had NCE, 21.0% had both HND and degree and 3.8% had no formal education. Findings showed that 31.7% of the residents were owners of the building while 68.2% were living in rented apartments. Findings revealed that 40.9% of the respondents have bad drainage system which would lead to dirty environment and 6.5% having very good drainage system. The study concluded that majority of building structures in the study area are old that existed for decades without maintenance and the surrounding environment very poor due to neglect.
Mohamad Heri Hidayattuloh, Azis Nur Bambang, Amirudin Amirudin
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 30-37; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.1.30-37

Abstract:
Green economy is an economic concept that aims to improve human welfare, reduce inequality, and preserve the environment and carry out development that is in line with the carrying capacity of the environment. Tegal Regency has a complete tourist attraction consisting of natural attractions and special interest attractions. One of the special interest attractions being developed is Cempaka Tourism Village, Bumijawa District. This Cempaka Tourism Village relies on the concept of populist economy based on local wisdom and the beauty of the natural environment. The purpose of this study is to inventory the potential and attractiveness of Cempaka Tourism Village and to prioritize the most suitable tourism potential in the development of Cempaka Tourism Village as a means of improving the community's economy based on the concept of a green economy. This paper employs both the qualitative and quantitative methods. The analytical tool used is the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method with the help of the Expert Choice application. Based on the results, it can be seen that Cempaka Tourism Village has the potential and attractiveness to be developed into a tourist village with the concept of a green economy. The best priority in the development of Cempaka Tourism Village is to utilize the Slumpring Market as an alternative to improve the environment-based community economy.
Intan Hapsari Surya Putri, Rukuh Setiadi
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 5, pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.5.1.1-10

Abstract:
Climate change has pushed communities to make continued adjustments in various aspects of their life in order to adapt and survive. Adaptive capacity is a key concept in understanding this context. Although a number of researches in the discipline of social sciences have examined the meanings and categories of adaptation capacity, the extent to which this knowledge is used in the field of physical geography has not been adequately studied. Most studies on adaptive capacities within this discipline are focused largely on measuring the level or status of adaptation capacity (i.e. high, medium, or low) in a given region. Moreover, these studies have typically interpreted adaptation capacity as rigid and static. Thus, it sets the same index for all adaptive capacity categories. Sometimes it provides a varied index, but it does not give adequate consideration to the actual condition influencing adaptation capacity (i.e. the characteristic of adaptation goals, actors, resources, and etc.). With a case study approach focused in Tanjungmas Sub-district, this study aims to build a conceptual model which connects overall adaptive capacity categories using qualitative methods. We interviewed 18 key persons including sub-district officers, community leaders, women associations, and other local organisation members. This model may help researchers in the area of physical geography to conceptualize adaptation capacities and to establish an index that more accurately reflects local conditions following additional brief field assessments.
Hendrawan Toni Taruno
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 49-56; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.2.49-56

Abstract:
Poverty is a complex and multidimensional issue. Over the past four decades, the number of poor in Indonesia has experienced a significant decline, from 40.10 percent in 1976 to 9.82 percent in March 2018. Nevertheless, the disparity of poverty rates between provinces is still quite high. The poverty rate in several provinces in Java Island, for example, is already at the single-digit level, while in Eastern Indonesia, is still more than double-digit level. As it is known, public spending and economic growth are two crucial instruments on poverty reduction programs. This study aims to investigate the role of economic growth and public spending, particularly education, health, and social protection on poverty reduction in Indonesia. By using panel data from 31 provinces during 2009-2018 period, this study used two regression models to analyze the effects of these two variables on poverty reduction, both in urban and rural areas. This study shows that public spending on health and education sectors has a slightly different effect on poverty reduction between urban and rural areas. Convincingly, spending allocation on health and education has had a significant effect to reduce poverty rate in rural areas, while the decline of poverty rates in urban is likely more influenced by spending on health. This study also shows that over the past ten years, economic growth and social protection spending did not have a significant effect on reducing poverty rates. Therefore, in order to reduce poverty more effectively, it would be better for the government to focus its poverty reduction programs on investment in health and education sectors.
Didi Nuryadin, Samsubar Saleh, Amirullah Setya Hardi, Evita Hanie Pangaribowo
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 57-68; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.2.57-68

Abstract:
Developments in Yogyakarta City have driven residents of the city and its outskirts to access available social facilities, such as education, healthcare, and employment. If this continues, various social and urban problems may emerge, including increased population density and traffic congestion. Another implication of this process is decreased environmental carrying capacity as a result of continued use of non-sustainable approaches to development. This study aims to model the complexity of the relationships between aspects i.e., social, economic, and environmental of the area studied. The system dynamics method is used, as it is a disciplinary approach that is able to fully explore problems that occur in interconnected systems rather than examining incidents partially. As the basis for this model, the causal loop diagram (CLD) model has been applied based on literature studies and field observations. The result shows that developments in the tourism and education sectors are the main factors affecting the intersections of social, economic, and environmental considerations.
Maria Ekacarini Jayanimitta, Fadjar Hari Mardiansjah
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 38-48; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.2.38-48

Abstract:
To reduce slum areas, the government of Semarang City has issued a decree of determination of slum areas in 2014 and initiated some slum upgrading activities from the central and local government. Kaligawe, as one of the areas close to the industrial estate and has many residents, is included in a slum area that must be handled. The slum area in Kaligawe consists of 7.35 hectares from RW 1 – RW 4. In addition to the description of the slum characteristics, residents' assessment is also needed regarding the neighborhood condition. This study aims to analyze residents’ assessment in Kaligawe as one of the slum areas in Semarang. This study applied a questionnaire survey that was distributed to 90 residents of Kelurahan Kaligawe slum area randomly from RW 1 – RW 4 and NUAP Kaligawe 2017 document review as the data collection source. The findings indicated that although Kaligawe has a low socioeconomic level, the residents’ assessment of Kaligawe’s neighborhood is overall good. It is because they are already used to live with recent neighborhood conditions, and also significant improvement resulted due to slum upgrading program in Kaligawe area.
Dewa Putu Aris Sadana, Nyoman Utari Vipriyanti, I Putu Sujana
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 69-74; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.2.69-74

Abstract:
Green Open Space (GOS), especially Public Green Space (PGS), plays an important role in implementing an urban area's sustainability. Until now, there has been no study of determining the PGS Availability in the Semarapura Urban Area. The study aims to determine PGS Availability in the Semarapura Urban Area based on the type, area, percentage, and area distribution of PGS. Data collection techniques in this study were field observations and secondary data surveys. The data analysis technique in this study is the Geographic Information System (GIS) or mapping. The results showed that Public Green Space (PGS) availability in Semarapura Urban Area was only 8.92 percent of Semarapura Urban Area's total area. This study's results can be used as a basis for determining the strategy of providing PGS in Semarapura Urban Area.
Kushandajani Kushandajani
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.1.1-6

Abstract:
The issuance of Law No. 6/2014 that is followed with the distribution of village fund has led the rise of program initiatives from village people. One of the crucial elements of development that needs for attention is social and economic development for women. Women's roles in these two areas are significant as compared to the other sectors like politics. Developing women in these two sectors is expected to encourage further development in the village. The research aims to identify the involvement of women in village development, in one village in Central Java, Lerep Village, Ungaran Barat District, Semarang Regency, through two domains: social and economic in 2017. This research is based on qualitative research using first-hand data collected from interviews with selected informants. This research used a case study as an approach and was focused on one village, namely Lerep, Semarang District, Central Java. In Lerep, we can see that the government have strived to a prioritized woman in their empowerment programs. The areas of development include health, education, domestic violence minimization, agriculture, entrepreneurship, and poverty reduction. As a result, women in Lerep could gain more income and enjoy some public facilities provided by the village government, which contribute to the improvement of woman health. In the future, there is a need to encourage woman empowerment as a framework for village development. Therefore, the advantage of the village fund will bring further impacts on society as a whole.
, Khalid Adam, Diana Kristina
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 19-28; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.1.19-28

Abstract:
The railway transport node in Kutoarjo, serving the southern route of Java, is an excellent opportunity for Kutoarjo's economic growth. Kutoarjo, located in the administrative area of Purworejo Regency in RTRW of Central Java Province belongs to Purwomanggung regional system covering Purworejo Regency, Wonosobo Regency, Magelang Regency, Magelang City, and Temanggung Regency. An international airport is also being built in Kulonprogo Regency, Special Region of Jogjakarta Province, which will be integrated with the existing stations in Purworejo Regency, explicitly located in Kutoarjo sub-district, Kutoarjo Station. The construction of NYIA (New Yogyakarta International Airport) in Kulon Progo is an excellent opportunity for the rise and trigger for Kutoarjo. However, the current condition of the existing Kutoharjo station is not optimal and does not significantly give added value to the economy either in Kutoarjo or Purworejo. Kutoharjo Station is only a temporary transit point, and there is no other object which can make visitors want to stop longer in Kutoharjo. This study aims to formulate a management development of Kutoarjo as a transit city that can contribute to mobilizing the economy in Purworejo Regency and its surrounding areas. The analysis is conducted by considering movement patterns, development of transit areas, supporting sectors and policies. Based on the analysis results, it can be seen that the development of transit area using seamless tourism concept requires ± 1.4 ha of land around Kutoarjo station, which is still included in 200 meters (walkable) radius. Result of study reveals that the development of node transit is supported by a potential tourism sector. The implication of this transit area development is the absorption of labor force in 2038 as many as 12,213 people. Besides, there is an economic increase of PAD (LGR) of 55.7% which eventually leads the LGR (PAD) reach IDR. 2.328.129.852.138 in 2039.
Hasti Widyasamratri, Mila Karmilah
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 14-18; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.1.14-18

Abstract:
Coastal is the most vulnerable area in climate change, with no exception in Coastal Java island. Reveal, 65% of the Java island population is to be vulnerable to coastal hazards such as tidal flood. The northern Java coastal area has a significant position in logistic connectivity throughout areas in the entire Java island. Abrasion and sedimentation are the most frequent effect were impacted to the coastal land cover (i.e. ponds, mangrove forest, and settlement). However, there is a lack of awareness among local communities, although they directly impact of those hazards. This study aims to identify local community knowledge of coastal disaster mitigation in Mangunharjo, Tugu sub-district Semarang, by using quantitative methods. Field observation and a simple descriptive statistic were used to analyze. The result showed that the majority of the respondents has high vulnerability on coastal hazard and disaster since they are living very close to the coastal water body.
Dwi Nila Andriani, Ramadhan Prasetya Wibawa, Liana Vivin Wihartanti
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 7-13; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.1.7-13

Abstract:
Madiun City is one of the cities in East Java Province and is known as a city of trade and industry, Madiun community, in general, is a picture of modern society even though it is far from economic development in the capital city. Madiun is a city that has the potential to become an advanced economic center in the city of Madiun. Current conditions indicate that the unemployment rate and the quality of human resources in the city of Madiun are still low. Data from the Manpower Office of the city of Madiun noted that the number of unemployed people in the local area reached 5,700. Besides, people's economic strength has not developed optimally, and the index of public purchasing power is still low. In 2018 data from the Central Bureau of Statistics illustrates that poverty in Madiun City reached 4.49% or as many as 7.92 thousand people. One way to alleviate poverty in the city of Madiun is through community-based economic empowerment. This study aims to formulate a strategy to alleviate poverty through community-based economic empowerment and to improve the living standards of people in the city of Madiun. The method used in this study is qualitative by using primary and secondary data. Data collection is done by interviews, documentation, and field observations. The findings of the study are that the existence of community-based economic empowerment in Madiun city can increase economic income and increase the community's insight into becoming more open to the economy of the community, as well as the newly formed community. The efforts of fostering and empowering have been carried out by the government and the local community through business dissemination, small and medium industry counseling, strengthening community participation in training, and providing community training, namely how to build a robust community, management training, and marketing system training.
, Rialdi Syaputra
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 4, pp 29-37; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.4.1.29-37

Abstract:
The number of village enterprises in Jambi Province until 2017 was only 320 of 1,551 villages. Need more village enterprises to be established in order to increase the economic independence of rural areas and their community. However, that is not easy since many existing village enterprises currently experience some difficulties. This study aims to analyze problems faced by village enterprises and programs prioritized to overcome the problems. The research conducted in three different locations that represent western part of Jambi, middle and eastern part of Jambi. Each of them had different core businesses, namely Dusun Dalam of Kerinci Regency (core business in processing of agricultural products), Lubuk Beringin of Bungo Regency (core business is tourism village), and Dataran Kempas of Tanjung Jabung Barat Regency (core business is the production of compost). Data collected by doing observation and focus group discussion and then analyzed by using Interpretative Structural Model (ISM). This study reveals that the main problems concerned with human resources even though they are expressed by stakeholders in each village enterprise with different narratives. Issues concerning capital also arise, but they are not in the top position of all problems faced. The programs they put in priorities are some training in area of leadership, accountancy, marketing, entrepreneurship and others that related to the development of human resources.
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 95-103; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.2.95-103

Abstract:
Some evidences have emerged indicating that there are regional disparities in East Java Province and industrialization seems to give its contribution in creating regional disparities. In 2014, Manufacturing industry dominated the contribution to the GDP which was 29%, on the other hand mostly the people who worked in the agricultural sector, and so the land which mostly agricultural. This study aims to identify factors influencing the disparities in East Java Province. This statement is also strengthened by the Williamson index which showed that the regional disparities were quite high, with two districts indicated to contributing the most, Kediri and Surabaya City. By using factor analysis, this research will try to answer what factors influencing the disparities statistically, and cluster analysis is trying to figure out the disparities spatially. Then it is going to be proven that some districts agglomerated in a certain area and can implicate the disparities in East Java.
Muhammad Indra Hadi,
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 76-83; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.2.76-83

Abstract:
Social entrepreneurship (SE) could be implemented to reveal the contribution of potential business opportunity and added value creation for its surrounding community. In the context of SME and cluster development, the SE implementation is more likely to be found in the kampong area, which has a high level of kinship system. This condition makes the application of local entrepreneurship in some cases potentially forms the characteristic of kampong through the diffusion of business innovation. This research depicts how the role of social entrepreneurs is capable of creating the characteristics of creative kampong by taking the study area in Semarang City. Through the cluster business approach, the result of this research shows the entrepreneurship transformation in becoming social entrepreneurship, in line with the development of kampong to become creative kampong by the role of social entrepreneurship. This entrepreneurship transformation occurs because of the stimulation of absorbed innovation transfer massively by the community. The implementation of local entrepreneurship has indeed influenced the characteristics of kampong and in some extents, can create the identity of creative kampong in Semarang City.
Marthin Oktovianus Nggili, Sugiono Soetomo
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 84-94; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.2.84-94

Abstract:
Mejobo Village was located in the Southern part of Kudus Regency, is a strategic area for the development of industrial activities. The growth of small and household, industrial activities in agricultural areas in Mejobo Village has led to the formation of the rural-urban areas (rurban). This study aims to describe the dynamics of sustainable development in rurban areas in Mejobo Village alongside the development of the industrial sector in agricultural areas. The research method being used in this study is quantitative, where data are collected through questioner, conducted observation, semi-structured interview, and obtained documents that are relevant to the investigation. The research shows that in Mejobo Village proves of sustainable development can be found within the economic activities; productivity of industrial activities; community activities and the availability of environmental facilities and infrastructure. Through this study, it can be concluded that the change from rural to rural-urban areas due to the development of small industries and households’ industries in Mejobo Village has been sustainable, with the need for continuous attention towards the productivity of the agricultural areas, so that it remains as the basis of local economic development.
, N. Vinky Rahman, Subhilhar Subhilhar, Julaihi Wahid
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 56-66; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.2.56-66

Abstract:
Spatial planning can improve one’s quality of life by enhancing the environmental quality and its potential. Thus, the application of the concept of identity into the planning process is essential in emphasizing the significance of a place, especially in heritage tourism area, where tourist satisfaction is obtained from the tourism objects peculiarities that become the place identity. However, similar studies are still limited so that this study will contribute to filling the gaps. This study is conducted in Maimoon Palace District, a historic area in Medan. This study aims to examine the application of the concept of spatial planning based on the area identity. A qualitative method is used to collect the data about spatial planning elements in the area. The findings indicate that the existing spatial planning has already contained the place identity. However, many problems in spatial planning elements still cause a chaotic view of the area. Therefore, the government should improve the area not only by improving the physical quality but also increasing tourist satisfaction to enhance tourism attractiveness.
, Sri Suwitri, Hardi Warsono, Ida Hayu Dwimawanti, Alfina Handayani
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 67-75; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.2.67-75

Abstract:
Compared with other Industrial parks in Jababeka, West and East Java, industrial parks progress in Central Java are less developed. This condition is mainly due to the lack of optimal management. Only limited studies comprehensively discuss the differences among in industrial parks in Central Java in particularly in management aspect. The research aims to comparatively analyze the differences and similarities of three industrial parks in term of their administration (location selection and preparation), infrastructure provision and management. This research adopts a descriptive-qualitative research method to discuss a particular research problem. The previous survey of this study was conducted in eight industrial parks management in Central Java. Three industrial parks (KIW, Terboyo, and BSB) representing industrial park s as a core business, an industrial plot provider and a residential area supporter were profoundly explored in dept. The data were collected through observation, focus group discussion (FGD), in-depth interviews and documentation. The key informants are the industrial park manager s and their team. The result s show that jurisdictional prerequisites are an important factor in the development of industrial estates, affecting construction costs and future management. The provision of infrastructure is fairly adequate. The quality of industrial park management does not depend on the status of ownership but the professionalism of the manager and tenant satisfaction. Both KIW and BSB have proved to offer better service performance than Terboyo. As own state regulation, however, KIW, there are many strict regulations and supervision, especially in land acquisition. Hence, the concept of land banking and supportive regulation are needed. Finally, the manager's commitment is pivotal to carry out the business and master plans.
, Agus Sutanto, Andiani Andiani, , Sulamith Kastl
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.1.1-9

Abstract:
In 2015 and 2016, the Education and Training Center of Geology, Mineral, and Coal (Pusdiklat Geologi, Mineral dan Batubara) developed training of Introduction to Geology for Spatial Planning based on a new standard curriculum. The objective of this training is to prepare the participants in dealing with basic environmental geology data and its analysis for spatial planning, including data and information management and generation, basic knowledge in the geographic information system (GIS) as well as the data interpretation and obstacles within spatial planning regarding the geological factors. Furthermore, the training is meant to introduce participants to basic methods in spatial planning processes, such as participatory planning, scenario building, and conflict analysis for geologically-induced conflicts in spatial planning. One focus of the training is the issue of disaster prevention via spatial planning. For this topic, the training refers to the Guideline for the Implementation of Geological Hazard Information in Spatial Planning (Pedoman Penyusunan Informasi Bahaya Geologi untuk Penataan Ruang) developed by the Geological Agency of Indonesia in 2015, supported by the German Development Cooperation. The approach of the new training differs from the previous standard curriculum which focused on operational and more technical procedures and scoring of geological analysis. One problem of passed training is the effectiveness of the training due to different knowledge levels of the participants, outsourced training parts and the often-passive didactic method implemented during the training. The new training is using a blended learning system, combining between e-learning in the introductory phase of the training to harmonize the participant's background and a highly interactive approach with practical elements to encourage the participants to apply theoretical knowledge directly. Moreover, the training aims to improve the participants’ capabilities to implement their knowledge to real case studies, from which they are likely to become more competent to fulfill their office tasks for sure. The new curriculum and training setup is adaptive to the current development process, using methods of gap analysis and SWOT analysis, determined contents, didactical needs, and limitations. These methods help to compare the expected performance of the new curriculum, both internally and externally, with the performance of the previous curriculum. Furthermore, the whole process is accompanied by focus group discussions to acquire feedback, reviews, and considerations for the setup and content of the changes applied to the curriculum.
, Ake Wihadanto
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 32-43; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.1.32-43

Abstract:
Local Government of Magelang Regency initiates the Sister Village Program after Mount Merapi Eruption in 2010. The idea of this program is to connect villages at risk from Merapi eruption to partner villages with less risk in the surrounding regions. This program is part of post-disaster recovery initiatives at the local level which includes planned evacuation routes, shelters, provision of food and other daily essentials. This paper aims to shed light on the role of sister village program in promoting community resilience after the volcanic eruption of Merapi. It is found that the system of sister village program can fulfill many aspects of community resilience components. Considering Indonesia is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, this program should be regarded as a good example to be replicated in other prone areas in the country.
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 19-31; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.1.19-31

Abstract:
For several decades, Jakarta has witnessed massive urbanization that leads to urban slum problems. The problems have always been associated with urban kampung, the informal neighborhood which grows and tends to be more impoverished over times. The local government has implemented the Kampung Improvement Program (KIP) to reduce the problems. The program which included sites-and-services program, and resettlement policy was not entirely successful to overcome slum problems. In 2013, the Governor of Jakarta launched Kampung Deret Program (KDP) as an alternative to the on-site slum upgrading policy. However, the KDP was eventually postponed and removed from the local budget plan of Jakarta Province in 2015 due to some problems in the implementation. This article is aimed at explaining the effectiveness of the KDP program and analyzing alternative strategies for effective policy implementation of KDP. This study uses quantitative methods by applying observation, interview and documentation to collect the primary and secondary data. Petogogan and Pasar Minggu in South Jakarta were selected as cases. The study shows that there are technical difficulties faced by the authorities during the implementation of KDP. KDP Petogogan was quite successful comparing to the KDP Pasar Minggu in terms of installed housing, basic infrastructures-facilities, and security of tenure. The implementation was quite successful due to the application of some form of equal approaches which were based on the characteristic of policy object and the slum dwellers in every selected slum. Following the approach, KDP was implemented under three packages: KDP I, KDP II, and KDP III. It was finally found that the KDP packages were considered as an effective on-site slum upgrading policy that can minimize resistance and maximize participation from the slum dwellers.
Eko Wahyudi
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 10-18; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.1.10-18

Abstract:
Climate change is a global issue that all governments have to encounter nowadays. In recent years, many governments are aware of the environmental issues necessary to agenda setting in their development objectives. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) conducted by the United Nations gives guidelines for the governments to integrate both economic and environmental issues in a sustainable development framework. Meanwhile, the rural development has also become a global agenda in reducing the disparity between urban and rural areas. Many governments have conducted development strategies for ensuring economic prosperity along with ecological sustainability, yet for generating rural-urban equality as well. Low Carbon Green Growth Program is one of the strategies aimed to meet those objectives. The main purpose of the program is to reduce carbon dioxide emission to minimize the effects of greenhouse gasses (GHGs) as the main cause of climate change and global warming. An immediate action useful to implement the program is managing and utilizing biochar in agricultural process. Previous studies have proved that the biochar reduces CO2 emission and also restores soil fertility. One of the best applicable Low Carbon Green Growth Programs might be the pilot project conducted in Kameoka City of Japan called The Carbon Minus Project. The project’s main purpose is to reduce carbon emission by promoting a low-carbon lifestyle, yet economically profitable. Nganjuk Regency generates abundant biomass from agriculture products, livestock, plantation, and forestry. The solid biomass can be converted into biochar through a pyrolysis process. The result of this study is expected to be taken into consideration by the local governments to promote low carbon lifestyle, to combat climate change, and yet to reduce the rural-urban disparity.
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 3, pp 44-55; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.3.1.44-55

Abstract:
Excessive utilization of coastal resources is threatening the livelihood of coastal dependent people. The current challenge is how to maintain and use coastal resources sustainably without reducing their potential benefits in the future. In response to coastal sustainability issues, many countries have implemented a policy to support marine protected areas. Until 2008, approximately 3.2 million hectares of marine protected areas conserved in Indonesia. One of them located in Ujungnegoro-Roban, Batang Regency of Central Java Province, Indonesia. This study aims to analyze fisherman livelihoods in Ujungnegoro-Roban, which may affect the fishermen’s conservation choices. This study employs questionnaire survey as the main data collection source, which was distributed to 60 fishermen randomly. The findings indicated some fisherman livelihood factors which have significant support for conservation activities, i.e. age, experience, income level and fisherman organization membership.
Nila Ardhyarini H. Pratiwi, Yovi Dzulhijjah Rahmawati, Ivo Setiono
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.2.74-86

Abstract:
Climate change will greatly affect many aspects of Indonesia’s economy, society, and environment. The vulnerability of individuals to climate change will depend on their adaptive capacity and manifestations of gender inequality can affect this capacity. It is generally acknowledged that women may be more vulnerable to climate change impact than men. Therefore, gender inequality becomes the critical issue on climate change adaptation. However, it is not yet mainstreamed into climate change adaptation program in Indonesian cities. With regard to such circumstance, this study assessed the gender dimensions in the context of climate change vulnerability, and how to mainstream gender-sensitive into climate change adaptation program at the local level with a case of Cirebon, Indonesia, in urban and rural areas. Mixed methods were employed for this study by combining quantitative and qualitative analysis through explanatory and comprehensive analysis. We examined the gender differences on socio-economic condition by using the socio-ecological model with various variables consisting of literacy and education, livelihood, access to and control over resources, health, mobility, female-headed household, and roles in decision-making. The results highlight that there are different gender’s adaptive capacities between urban and rural areas to climate change, and gender mainstreaming in climate change adaptation in an urban area is easier to be implemented than in a rural area which influenced by the level of society and policymakers ability and awareness.
Balqis Febriyantina Gunari, Citra Persada, Zulqadri Ansar
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.2.87-93

Abstract:
The purpose of this research is to identify priority factors for community participation in the planning stage of Neighborhood Upgrading Shelter and Sector Project (NUSSP) in Bandar Lampung. The analytical method used is Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to obtain the priority factors gathered from nine key informants, and factor analysis method to analyze data taken from 101 participating communities in Kota Karang settlement as the case. The result shows that the priority factors causing community participation are: 1) a good cooperation among the key stakeholders involving the local government, the village head, the chairman of the neighborhood association, the community’s public figures, and non-governmental organization (NGO) represented in the community self-reliance organization (Lembaga Keswadayaan Masyarakat/LKM); 2) community inclusion by the NGO In the LKM; 3) community’s cooperative behaviour in the neighborhood; 4) clarity of the program socialization by the local government with an easy-to-understand language; 5) the low-income community in decent life; 6) proper acknowledgement to community opinion; 7) community freedom to speak in the public meeting.
Ambar Teguh Sulistiyani, Kristi Yuliani, Muammar Yuliana
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.2.94-107

Abstract:
Yogyakarta City is passed by three rivers, i.e. Winongo River, Code River, and Gajahwong River. Due to that geological condition, Yogyakarta City is prone to annual flood more often than the other types of disaster. Dealing with the risk, the Yogyakarta City Government introduces Kampung Tangguh Bencana or disaster resilient villages (DRV). DRV is a village which has an ability to identify hazards in its environment and is able to organize the human resources in reducing the susceptibility as well as increasing the capacity to reduce the disaster risks. These abilities are carried out in development planning and capacity enhancement in restoration after the emergency condition. Thus, it is important for DRVs to understand the responsiveness and the ability to become autonomous in flood counter-measurement in Yogyakarta City. In order to find out the responsiveness of DRVs in handling the flood, a research using qualitative approach was performed through a set of interviews with key persons. Information was gained from related stakeholders, such as the local government officers, community, and local agency for disaster management (Badan Penanggulangan Bencana Daerah or BPBD) as the organizer of the program. Triangulation method was performed to find out the synchronization between stakeholders. The villages observed in this research were Karanganyar, Warungboto, and Wirobrajan which were located on the river bank. The result of this research covered the description in handling flood through DRVs, the form and identity of DRVs, the contract-expand model action in the management phases of disaster, as well as the advantages and weaknesses of DRVs. The data gained was analyzed in depth by comparing the responsiveness and the ability to become autonomous in the three villages. The recommended formulation was given to the DRVs, the local government, and the local community to carry out the DRVs effectively and sustainably.
, Rohmad Supriyadi, Diah Lenggogeni
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.2.51-61

Abstract:
Since the enactment of Law No. 23 Year 2014 about Local Government, there is a mechanism shift in service delivery from the local government to central government, especially related to infrastructure management in border areas. This shift has reversed the policy of decentralized service delivery mechanism to centralized one. This policy has confused the local governments in adjusting their policies to the central government policies. Thus, an asymmetric policy needs to be implemented in order to accelerate border areas development. This paper intends to propose the alternative options in dealing with the new policy and to design a better way how the central government may intervene asymmetrically the sub-national governments in accelerating development and service delivery mechanism in border areas. The descriptive analysis is used as the main method for this paper.
Novi Puspitasari, Djoko Santoso Abi Suroso,
The Indonesian Journal of Planning and Development, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.14710/ijpd.2.2.62-73

Abstract:
West Java is an Indonesian Province which has a high risk of climate change impacts particularly in terms of increased exposure from many natural disasters. A natural disaster occurs frequently in the West Java Province, making the region vulnerable due to the biggest population in Indonesia it belongs to. Children are the most vulnerable population facing climate change impact because their physiological condition is not fully developed yet. They have a low adaptation ability towards the predicted changes. Therefore, mainstreaming climate change adaptation for children into development planning is important. It is also critical in order to induce more effective adaptation program. This paper analyzes how far the current development plan in the West Java Province reckons child adaptation mainstreaming to climate change. Data collection methods used in this research are the secondary method through the related development plan and the primary method through an in-depth interview to the related government institutions. Based on the analysis results using a content analysis, the region has a potential entry point to mainstream the adaptation of climate change into the development plan, involving seven government institutions. The opportunity of entry point from the West Java development plan is found in Badan Pengelolaan Lingkungan Hidup Daerah/BPLHD (the Regional Environmental Management Agency) work plan. However, among these institutions, it is only BPLHD and the Health Department which almost fulfill all of the institutional capacity components to mainstreaming the adaptation of climate change for children into the West Java development planning. Therefore, both institutions are potentially recommended acting for initiators to induce coordination between the seven government institutions to mainstream the adaptation of climate change for children into the West Java development planning.
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