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Published: 2 March 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 193-212; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268561

Abstract:
Extensive research examines senses of home in aging, focusing on built and care environments. In parallel, a body of work examines housing governance, reviewing degrees of resident satisfaction. However, there is little crossover between this work, with governance research only rarely considering senses of home. This article argues for attention to the interconnections between provider-scale housing governance and senses of home in older age, arguing that governance mechanisms structure the housing context and provide the framework through which home is experienced and lived. Through a case study of a small, affordable housing community in Sydney, Australia, it shows that housing governance can profoundly shape senses of home in aging, both contributing to and diminishing senses of home. Further, it points to a connection between housing governance and housing design with different housing typologies associated with different aging bodies and forms of management practice, with profound implications for residents' senses of home.
, Noralyn Davel Pickens, Roger O. Smith
Published: 2 March 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 213-228; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1280579

Abstract:
We investigated the complex reasoning processes of professional home evaluators involved with home safety assessments. Twenty evaluators with varied professional training engaged in in-depth qualitative interviews. Two primary themes emerged: integrating expertise and tailoring interventions. Within these themes, evaluators expressed differences and similarities in how they obtained information, developed interventions, and addressed professional-client interactive reasoning as they identified needs. We propose an adapted ecological model to describe best practices for personalizing home modifications through an interprofessional lens. Differences among professional home evaluators reveal unique, yet overlapping reasoning processes. Interprofessional teams may better meet the holistic needs of home modification consumers.
Mehdi Nakhodaeezadeh, , , Hossein Matlabi, Fatemeh Raeesi Dehkordi
Published: 2 March 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 272-285; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1280583

Abstract:
In this cross-sectional study, we tested the relationship between sociophysical environment, quality of life (QOL), and perceived social support among elderly in Iran. The sample includes 128 participants recruited in the city of Shahrekord, Iran. We measured Evaluation of Older People Living Environment (EVOLVE); Control, Autonomy, Self-realization and Pleasure scale (CASP-19) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) tools respectively, through home-based observation and interview. A significant relationship was found between several domains of home environment, QOL, and perceived social support. The interaction effect of the home environment and gender in relation to QOL and perceived social support was statistically significant. Our results support that the home physical environment may not be considered a strong predictor of QOL among the Iranian elderly.
Published: 2 March 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 259-271; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1280582

Abstract:
This article reports older Australians' preferences for aging in place and predictors of their subsequent experiences drawing on a longitudinal study in Melbourne over 16 years. At baseline, 40% had lived in their homes for 30 or more years and the majority had preference for aging in place. However, the proportion continuing to do so was lower, with reducing independence being a major barrier. Women, renters, those not living with a partner, or those with depressive symptoms were most vulnerable, while home ownership, socioeconomic resources, neighborhood satisfaction, and home modifications were positively associated with aging in place.
Published: 2 March 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 229-242; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1280580

Abstract:
Retirement village living is a growing housing option for older people. Research to date has focused primarily on the social milieu of the village with limited attention to the legal and financial obligations associated with this form of specialized seniors' housing. Using data from a survey of 312 Australian residents, this article suggests while residents place financial and legal obligations at the forefront when considering relocation and during residency, there is variability in professional advice and constraints on choices when needs and capacities change. The distinctive obligations associated with retirement village living require greater attention to ensure an informed lifestyle decision.
Published: 28 July 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 394-409; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1335672

Abstract:
Background: A number of long-term care homes in Nova Scotia, Canada, have been built or redesigned with new models of care with expanded care aide scope of practice and neighborhood-style layouts. Our objective was to examine what physical characteristics (bed size, owner-operator), model of care, and relational (family–staff relationship, perceived staff–resident relationship) factors were associated with increased family-member perception of homelikeness in long-term care homes. Methods: We analyzed surveys collected from 273 family members from 23 long-term care homes in Nova Scotia, Canada. We conducted a multivariate linear regression to assess variables associated with increased family-member perception of homelikeness. Results: We found that relationships between family and staff, perceived resident-to-resident relationships, and family involvement in decision making were positively associated with increased family perception of homelikeness. We found no significant associations between model of care or physical characteristics and increased family perception of homelikeness. Conclusion: Relationships among family members, residents, and staff are integral to family members feeling at home in their loved one's long-term care home. Feeling at home in long-term care is largely related to family-member perception of meaningful social interactions between family and staff, and between residents.
, Molly Knowles, Kristie A. Porter, Janet O'keeffe, Joshua Wiener
Published: 28 July 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 351-366; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1335669

Abstract:
Residential care settings (RCSs) are community-based housing and supportive services providers. Medicaid beneficiaries' access to RCSs is of concern to policymakers and other stakeholders because most people prefer community-based to institutional services and RCSs are generally less expensive than nursing homes. To better understand Medicaid beneficiaries' access to state-licensed RCSs, we examined Medicaid policies in 50 states and the District of Columbia, interviewed seven subject-matter experts, and conducted four state case studies informed by reviews of state policies and interviews with 27 stakeholders. Factors identified as influencing Medicaid beneficiaries' access to RCSs include Medicaid reimbursement rates for RCS services, the supply of Medicaid-certified RCSs and RCS beds, and policies that affect RCS room and board costs for Medicaid beneficiaries. Shifting Medicaid spending toward community-based instead of institutional care may require attention to these interrelated issues of RCS payment, supply, and room and board costs.
, GullBritt Rahm, Carolina Jernbro,
Published: 28 July 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 367-381; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1335670

Abstract:
Falls are a daily occurrence in nursing homes and few interventions for reducing fall-related injuries have proven to be effective. Impact absorbing flooring (IAF) in residential care has shown promising results in reducing fall-injuries and in the process of developing and implementing IAF all aspects are valuable to explore. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study is to describe the enrolled nurses (ENs) experiences of IAF. We carried out focus group interviews with ENs and used content analysis to process the data. The ENs experienced both negative and positive aspects with the IAF. Importantly, the ENs perceived the IAF as effective in preventing fall-injuries. They also appreciated the improvements in acoustics. Negative aspects were that the flooring initially was challenging to walk on and that it made it harder to maneuver heavy equipment. A significant and transferable finding in this study was the importance of the ENs' perceived difficulty in preventing fall-injuries amongst elderly people living in nursing homes. This seemed to be a driving force to accept the intervention. Although IAF affects the working conditions in a nursing home, ENs are willing to accept these issues given the perceived effectiveness of the intervention.
, Borin Kim, Joonyoung Cho
Published: 28 July 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 334-350; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1335668

Abstract:
Based on the premise that environmental support is an important facilitator for engagement in formal volunteering among vulnerable subgroups of older adults, we focus on older low-income individuals who live alone. Drawing on the environmental docility hypothesis, we examine the role living in senior housing has on the likelihood of volunteering. Data came from the 2012 wave of the Health Retirement Study (N = 1415). Kernel weights derived from propensity scores were used to account for observed sociodemographic and health characteristics associated with both senior housing living and the outcome. Logistic regression models showed that living in senior housing positively affected engagement in formal volunteering after adjusting for personal and environmental factors. As a modifiable target of intervention for successful and healthy aging, our findings provide important background knowledge for the development and implementation of housing-specific volunteer programs for vulnerable elders.
James M. Brandi, Nancy Kelley-Gillespie, Lawrence H. Liese, O. William Farley
Published: 4 December 2003
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 18, pp 73-88; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v18n01_05

Elayne Heisler Ma, Gary W. Evans, Phyllis Moen
Published: 4 December 2003
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 18, pp 5-23; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v18n01_02

Abstract:
This study investigates the experience of moving into a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) for those moving locally (intra-county) and from more of a distance (outside the county). Specifically, we compare the social contacts and health of long distance and local movers before and after their moves. A sample of older adults were interviewed a few months before they moved into a Northeast, United States CCRC and a year and a half after they had moved. As predicted, long distance movers were more apt to experience physical health declines in terms of percentage of health conditions experienced, as well as perceived health status. No such health declines were found for local movers. Contrary to expectations, the greater health declines of long distance movers were independent of their social network contacts, regardless of whether these relationships were with family or friends. Moreover, our evidence suggests that moving to a CCRC does not affect social integration or perceived social support with distance movers actually more likely than local movers to make new friends within the CCRC.
Benyamin Schwarz
Published: 4 December 2003
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 18, pp 1-3; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v18n01_01

Aimee D. Prawitz, Patricia Wozniak
Published: 19 October 2005
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 19, pp 27-48; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v19n02_03

Vincent R. Waldron, Richard Gitelson, Douglas Kelley, Jennifer Regalado
Published: 19 October 2005
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 19, pp 5-25; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v19n02_02

Elizabeth Field, Mike Walker, Geraldine Hancock,
Published: 19 October 2005
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 19, pp 107-117; https://doi.org/10.1300/j081v19n02_07

Published: 3 April 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 130-145; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1309931

Abstract:
Researchers at Portland State University's Institute on Aging (IOA) conducted Portland's age-friendly baseline assessment as part of the original 2006–2007 World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Age-Friendly Cities Project. This article describes the ongoing Portland and Multnomah County age-friendly initiatives, using Menec et al.'s ( 2011 Menec, V. H. , Means, R. , Keating, N. , Parkhurst, G. , & Eales, J. (2011). Conceptualizing age-friendly communities. Canadian Journal on Aging, 30(3), 479–493. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] ) ecological framework to highlight the interplay between people and environments (i.e., physical, social, and service environments). An overview is provided of Portland's age-friendly community-based research, the evolution and role of the Advisory Council, as well as recent housing policies that have been developed through university-community partnerships.
Published: 3 April 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 93-98; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2017.1309925

Abstract:
While the term “age-friendly” has become ubiquitous in the field of social gerontology, a clear definition of the term remains elusive. In an effort to clarify the role of age-friendly initiatives, Menec and colleagues presented a framework focused on social connectivity within an ecological model. The articles in this special issue address issues raised by this approach and its implications for policy, programs and scientific research.
, Karin Høyland, Berit Otnes
Published: 2 January 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 180-196; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.989778

Abstract:
De-institutionalization is a general trend for Scandinavian long-term care over the last decades. Denmark and Sweden have taken this trend a step further than Norway has, as Denmark suspended institutional care altogether in 1987 and Sweden in 1992. Since then, residential care has been provided to individuals in special housing in various forms. This housing is in principle “independent housing,” where residents are tenants and are provided services according to needs and not sites. This article concentrates on the Norwegian variations to this system, as this is the only country of the 3 that still provides residential care under 2 “regimes,” an institutional care regime and an assisted housing regime. Is assisted housing essentially different from institutional care, or is it better described as old wine in new bottles? The latter may be the case for Sweden, whereas Denmark stands out as having the most housing-oriented care model. Institutional care (i.e., nursing homes) still dominates in Norway, where assisted housing is merely a minor supplement to institutional care in most municipalities. The article explores the reasons for these trends and, in particular, the reasons for the Norwegian resistance to assisted housing as an alternative form of residential care.
Published: 2 January 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 77-91; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.989763

Abstract:
Recent changes in Finnish welfare policies have increased the need for family involvement in eldercare. This article uses qualitative interviews to study working adult daughters’ reasons for moving in with their parent(s). Coresidence was linked to the parents’ need for support, but also to the daughters’ life situations, family histories, the availability of welfare services, and cultural norms and values. The interviewees used the “familist” and “independent life” discourses in their speech. The familist discourse was used to argue for coresidence as a natural continuation of family traditions and life history, whereas the independent life discourse was used to legitimize the need for alternative care options and having a home of their own.
Ira Verma, Hannu Huttunen
Published: 2 January 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 92-110; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.989765

Published: 2 January 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 9-23; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.989119

Abstract:
This article presents an analysis of 2 short-term care facilities using actor-network theory with the aim of revealing performative processes in different networks in the buildings in use. The 2 facilities differed in architectural design, which was expected to influence their care model and organization. One facility was larger and accommodated 4 patients/residents in double rooms as well as permanent residents who stayed in single rooms. The other facility was smaller and accommodated only short-term care patients in single rooms. The study revealed that the latter facility received more care-demanding people than the other. The size and the type of patients/residents influenced the social environment. The larger facility was more busy and lively than the smaller one. However, the analysis did not show any difference in quality of care or ambiance. Both facilities were valued as either good or bad by different residents or staff members. The study concludes that therapeutic values and outcomes are defined and redefined in the ongoing performances of everyday interactions.
Emily A. Greenfield
Published: 1 January 2013
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 27, pp 120-145; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2012.754818

Abstract:
Naturally Occurring Retirement Community Supportive Services programs (NORC programs) aim to bring together stakeholders within a local area with a large number of older adults (e.g., a neighborhood or apartment building) to facilitate activities and services that promote aging in place. Despite enthusiasm for these programs, there is ongoing concern regarding their long-term sustainability, especially as federal funding to support NORC programs nationally has dwindled in recent years. This exploratory study aimed to develop a framework to describe NORC programs’ sustainability goals and strategies. As part of a statewide study in New Jersey, this study drew on data from semi-structured in-depth interviews with staff of 10 lead organizations that represented 15 NORC programs. Using a grounded theory analytic approach, findings revealed three types of sustainability goals: continuing the program indefinitely within the lead agency (described by eight organizations); integrating the program functions across other organizations (described by one organization); and defining the program as a finite project (described by one organization). Lead organizations implemented and developed their programs in ways that reflected their goals. This framework can be used to guide efforts to maintain, expand, and evaluate NORC programs and related community aging initiatives.
, James Leask, Chelsy George, Sandra Ziolkowski
Published: 3 July 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 298-328; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.1055026

Abstract:
Eight years of data analysis on residents’ status from three small Alzheimer care centers suggest notable stability in function. Individuals’ functional ability was best in their first year, but their year-to-year decline was mostly not significant. Cognitive abilities also were best in the resident's first year, but first-, second-, and third-year cognitive scores were not significantly different. We compared the residents’ dementia progression rate to the true rate of natural disease progression. This study, like others on small homelike settings, suggests that appropriate homelike environments maintain persons with dementia at an optimum level longer.
, , Wei Quin Yow, Wei Quin Yow, Debbie Loo, Debbie Loo, Ferninda Patrycia, Ferninda Patrycia
Published: 3 July 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 259-297; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.1055025

Abstract:
This article explores various relationships between the elderly's psychosocial well-being and components of aging-friendly community (continuity, compensation, connection, challenge, and contribution), in order to understand their perception of a matured estate and to discuss implications in housing neighborhood urban design. Interviews with elderly residents living in Bukit Merah (Redhill), one of the matured housing estates in Singapore with a high percentage of elderly residents, were conducted to understand how eldercare infrastructure and social spaces developed within the fabric of a high-rise, high-density public housing estate can support or inhibit their psychosocial well-being, as indicated by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Our results postulate that different groups of elderly form friendships and participate in activities in both formal social service centers and informal public spaces. The friendships formed in these places and the convenience of amenities around their houses may affect their perception of their current residences. While the elderly residents are generally satisfied with physical infrastructure, a comprehensive, integrated urban design is further needed to facilitate physical activities, social interactions, and active aging in the elderly in order to enhance their psychosocial well-being.
Published: 3 July 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 233-258; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.1055024

Abstract:
The aging-in-place agenda supports the right of seniors to live in their preferred environment, as the place where they can retain a sense of independence and control in old age. This right is compromised for vulnerable seniors who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Causes of homelessness in old age are complex, and pathways into and out of homelessness are multifaceted, including financial insecurity, relationship breakdown, and addiction, compounded by barriers to accessing services, shrinking social support networks, and complex health challenges. Addressing the multidimensional nature of homelessness in old age requires holistic solutions that bring together the knowledge and expertise of multiple stakeholders, not least seniors themselves. With this aim, this paper reports on findings from multistakeholder community dialogue sessions conducted across Metro Vancouver with seniors’ organizations, service providers, and local government to prioritize the challenges of senior homelessness in Metro Vancouver and propose strategies and solutions for addressing the issue. The paper highlights some of the ways in which services and housing supports can be designed to support older adults who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.
Published: 3 July 2015
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 29, pp 209-232; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2015.1055023

Abstract:
In Nova Scotia, Canada, the small-house model of care has been introduced as an alternative to institutional care settings, and the province has funded and built 11 new long-term care (LTC) communities in the small-house model. Each of the new facilities was built with multiple cottages housing 12 to 15 residents; each cottage features private bedrooms and a residentially scaled kitchen and dining area. Through smaller numbers of residents living in home areas, the goal of the Provincial Department of Health was to encourage relationship building, as well as to provide opportunities for autonomy and choice in resident daily living. A qualitative case study was conducted in one of these small-house communities, focusing on the model's impact on resident interaction and community integration. Thematic analysis revealed that while resident social patterns were directly impacted by the physical environment and culture of care in the new model, interpretations of these patterns by staff and family members were influenced by preexisting expectations of community integration rooted in institutional care models of the past.
, Britt Ebbeskog
Published: 2 January 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268559

Abstract:
This study investigated the reported life situations of home-dwelling older people who have experienced falls and have declined subjective health. Mixed method design was used and consisted of a quantitative study comprising questionnaires completed by 434 home-dwelling older people, and a qualitative study consisting of 30 interviews. The findings showed that declined physical function combined with limited health status was associated with falling. Despite limited physical condition, participants experienced well-being and life satisfaction in daily living. Insight obtained from these findings deepens our understanding of fallers and may provide a basis for future research leading to improvements within health care.
, Parnika Saxena
Published: 2 January 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 47-56; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268558

Abstract:
Research suggests that third party-arranged home sharing (“TPAHS”) enables elders to remain at home in advanced age by connecting elder home owners with suitable live-in “matches.” TPAHS potentially saves elders, their families, and Medicaid budgets millions of a dollars per year in avoided and postponed nursing home costs. In interviews with elder TPAHS participants of one TPAHS program, we found that similarity in values, ability to utilize the TPAHS organization's guidance, and, when relevant, familiarity with their matches' mental health challenges, correlated with said participants' satisfaction with their matches while a lack of these qualities correlated with match dissatisfaction. With these findings in mind, we suggest strategies TPAHS organizations can use to best serve the elderly TPAHS participants who may benefit from intensified match support but may not seek it.
Hanan Elsawahli, Azlan Shah Ali, ,
Published: 2 January 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268560

Abstract:
As Malaysia's population is aging rapidly, and since there is no specific housing policy for the elderly, it is vital that neighborhoods meet the different needs of elderly for active aging to maintain their quality of life. This study aims to investigate the neighborhood environmental variables, the outcome active aging, and potential variables that inhibit active aging in the elderly that lead to their quality of life. It examined quality-of-life determinants that are influenced by the existence of certain neighborhood characteristics. In the study, 385 older adults aged 60+ years residing in two different cities in Malaysia were surveyed. Multiple regression was used to explore how much variance in active aging variables the neighborhood environmental factors explained as a group. The results showed that permeability, accessibility, and facilitators to walking are key determinants of active aging. There is a need to improve the physical design of the neighborhoods with regard to these three factors.
, Lorraine Ritchie
Published: 2 January 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 34-46; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268557

Abstract:
Objective: To discuss the potential of a café on the premises of an aged-care facility as a vehicle for culture change. Method: Secondary analysis of primary qualitative data that explored the value of a café in an aged-care facility, compared with culture-change principles established from a literature review. Results: Secondary analysis established congruence between culture-change principles and the themes established in the primary qualitative data. A café, in one aged-care facility, has facilitated the following dimensions of culture change for residents: individualized care, facilitation of meaningful relationships, opportunities for participation in life roles, and creation of a sense of belonging. Conclusion: Culture change can be achieved through environmental innovations, such as a café, where food and dining maximize social opportunities and create a homelike environment that facilitates continuation of residents' identity.
, Denise C. Lewis, , Kerstin Gerst Emerson, Tiffany R. Washington, Matthew Lee Smith
Published: 2 January 2017
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 31, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1268555

Abstract:
The purpose of this article is to introduce a theoretical model for an aging-in-place housing specialist for those living in congregate housing facilities. A “needs assessment” tool is outlined to help facilitate the successful implementation of a Health and Aging Residential Service Coordinator (HARSC), both from a research perspective and from implementation of training curriculum for this specialized population. A model that provides both on- and off-site services is hypothesized to be most effective.
, George De Kam, Laura Dorland
Published: 1 October 2016
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 30, pp 430-449; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1224793

Abstract:
The aim of this article is to discuss approaches to services integration for older people in urban and rural aging environments in The Netherlands, and the preliminary effects of these approaches on local aging conditions. In urban areas, services integration revolves around the creation of functional spatial hierarchy. In rural areas, the emphasis is on forging links between service providers. Outcomes for health and use of professional care services are similar. Out-comes for housing, informal care, and accessibility of services differ between urban and rural areas in ways that can be traced back to local aging conditions and elements of the specific approach to services integration used. In both urban and rural areas, much more could be done to connect formal programs to the lifeworlds of older dwellers.
Published: 1 October 2016
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 30, pp 451-451; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1133146

Published: 1 October 2016
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 30, pp 412-429; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1224792

Abstract:
The perception of elderly residents as a homogeneous group is challenged by the diversification of lifestyles and emphasis on individuality in housing. Recently, there has been a rise in Finland in housing projects initiated by groups of elderly people, where the seniors themselves are seeking to fill in qualitative gaps in the offering of housing. This article presents a comparative analysis of four senior housing concepts that represent both a producer-driven (“for the elderly”) and a resident-driven (“by the elderly”) approach. The study shows that elderly people can be a resource for residential development and that this necessitates a different “design logic” than in conventional senior housing.
, , , Angela M. Greene, Ruby E. Johnson
Published: 1 October 2016
Journal of Housing For the Elderly, Volume 30, pp 380-395; https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2016.1224790

Abstract:
Residential care facilities, known by a variety of names such as assisted living or group homes, offer assistance to people who find it difficult to live alone but who do not need or wish to enter a nursing home. There is substantial variation in the amount that residents are charged each month. Data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities were used to identify factors that affect the total monthly charges to residents. These findings can inform an individual's search for an appropriate, affordable option.
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