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Results in Journal Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry: 30

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Foreste Virginia, Pellicano Massimiliano, Santini Mario, Bifulco Giuseppe, Gallo Alessandra
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 6, pp 031-033; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001030

Abstract:
We describe a case of thoracic endometriosis in a patient with a repeated episode of spontaneous pneumothorax. Investigations revealed diaphragmatic fenestrations and right-sided pleural and lung endometriosis. Considering the ultrasound evidence of pelvic endometriosis, the patient was scheduled for multidisciplinary surgical management, to treat in one step thoracic and pelvic endometriosis.
Picco Daniele de Cassia Rodrigues, Lopes Lenita Marangoni, Steiner-Oliveira Carolina, Nobre dos Santos Marinês
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 6, pp 021-027; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001028

Abstract:
Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in saliva with possible pH regulation, taste perception, and tooth formation effects. Objective: The aim of this work was to undertake a systematic review regarding the relationship between the expression/activity of CA VI in saliva and in dental biofilm and caries experience. Study design: Five databases were searched until February 2020. The composition was based on the PRISMA statement and on the PICOS model. First author, year, subject characteristics, analysis performed, outcome, measures & variables were extracted. The used terms were “carbonic anhydrase VI”, “saliva”, “dental biofilm” and “dental caries”. Results: Five studies in the English language were selected for this systematic review and the main discussed topics were the expression/activity of CA VI in saliva and/or in the dental biofilm of children, and its relationship with dental caries. Conclusion: Salivary carbonic anhydrase plays an important role in the caries dynamics process since there is an association between the expression/activity of CA VI in saliva and the experience of caries. Thus, this protein can predict the risk of dental caries in young patients.
Virani Khyati, Patel Pankti, Banker Alka, Muchhadia Rahul, Rajpara Yagnesh, Modi Yesha
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 6, pp 016-020; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001027

Abstract:
Objective: To establish the cephalometric norms of ‘Zero meridian line’ and ‘Mew line’ to assess the sagittal discrepancy in the maxilla and mandible of subjects in the Central Gujarat population Materials and methods: The sample was screened from the records from the hospital. 100 individuals (50 males, 50 females) of the age group between 18-50 years, native of Central Gujarat, with acceptable pleasing profile, no skeletal asymmetry, normal Class I occlusion having ideal anterior bite, less than 2 mm crowding and no history of previous orthodontic treatment were selected for the study. Lateral cephalograph were taken in natural head position. The linear measurements between points of soft tissue pogonion to the Zero Meridian line (vertical line dropped from soft tissue nasion) and distance of Mew line (the biting edge of the upper front teeth to the tip of the nose) was taken on cephalograms. Result: Mean value for soft tissue pogonion to the Zero meridian line on cephalograms was 0.2 mm for female and 0.8 mm for male and mean value for Mew line on cephalograms was 39 mm for female and 42 mm for male subjects. Conclusion: Normal value for soft tissue pogonion to the Zero meridian line is 0.8 + 1.8 mm for males and 0.2 + 1.7 mm for females, and normal value for Mew line is 41.2 + 3.2 mm for male and 39.4 + 2.2 mm for female in Central Gujarat population. Values other than normal suggests skeletal sagittal discrepancy of maxilla and/or mandible, which is helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning.
B Asha, C Rudrakshi, Mlv Prabhuji, P Pireethi
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 6, pp 010-016; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001026

Abstract:
Background and objectives: YKL-40, a C-reactive protein belongs to the positive acute-phase protein. It is also known as Human chitinase-3-like protein 1(HCI3L1) and is closely related to both acute and chronic inflammation. The present study aimed to detect and estimate the levels of YKL-40 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with healthy periodontium, chronic periodontitis, and rheumatoid arthritis with chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients in the age range of 25-55years were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups: Group I-15 Periodontal healthy patients, Group II-15 Chronic Periodontitis patients, and Group III-15 Rheumatoid arthritis with chronic periodontitis patients. Clinical parameters recorded were Plaque index, Gingival index, Gingival bleeding index, probing depth, and Relative attachment level. GCF samples were analyzed using ELISA. p - value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The highest mean YKL-40 concentration in GCF was observed in rheumatoid arthritis with Chronic periodontitis. The mean concentration of YKL-40 in GCF showed a three to four folds increase in its levels when compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001). Contrary, GCF YKL-40 levels between Group II and Group III were not significant. Conclusion: With the increase in severity of periodontal destruction from healthy periodontium to chronic periodontitis, there was a substantial increase in the concentration of YKL-40 in GCF. Correlation of GCF YKL-40 with clinical parameters demonstrated increased severity of the diseases increased its levels
Rajan Rachel, J Vidhya, Ns Azhagarasan, S Jayakrishnakumar, Ramakrishnan Hariharan
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 6, pp 001-009; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001025

Abstract:
Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Titanium dioxide and Gold nanoparticles surface treatment on the flexural strength of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) Heat cure denture base resins. Materials and methods: A total of thirty PMMA Heat cure denture base resin test samples were fabricated of size 65 x 10 x 2.5 mm (rectangular shaped) according to ADA specification no.2. The samples were divided into three groups as Conventional PMMA heat cure denture base resin samples (GROUP I, n = 10 CONTROL), PMMA Heat cure denture base resin samples coated with Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (GROUP II, n = 10) and PMMA Heat cure denture base resin samples coated with Gold nanoparticles (GROUP III, n = 10). GROUP II and GROUP III PMMA Heat cure denture base resin test samples were coated by Magnetron sputtering. Flexural strength of GROUP I, GROUP II and Group III was evaluated by a three-point bend test using a Universal testing machine and the mean values were obtained. Results: The Mean flexural strength of GROUP I, GROUP II and GROUP III samples were 114.79 MPa, 142.48 MPa and 154.70 MPa respectively. On comparative evaluation of the flexural strength among the three groups GROUP III PMMA Heat cure denture base resin samples exhibited the highest flexural strength followed by GROUP II and least by GROUP I. The statistical analysis by ANOVA had shown that there is significance in flexural strength among the groups tested (p - value = 0.000*). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, PMMA heat cure denture base resin coated with Gold nanoparticles showed the highest flexural strength followed by PMMA Heat cure denture base resin coated with Titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Conventional PMMA Heat cure denture base resin without any surface treatment showed the least flexural strength.
, Youssef Jilan M, Ata Fatma, Anees Mohamed M, Cha Seunghee, Katz Joseph
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 5, pp 005-011; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001024

Abstract:
Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease. The potential risk of malignant transformation in OLP remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to review original clinical studies published in indexed databases, which assessed the potential risk cofactors which were implicated in the malignant transformation of oral lichen planus. We focused our search to include most of the studies that reported malignant transformation of oral lichen planus using different combinations of the following key indexing terms: oral lichen planus, malignant transformation, smoking, alcohol, chronic inflammation, candida, human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and immunosuppression. The animal studies were excluded from our study. Despite a dearth of studies on this topic we have identified consumption of tobacco and/or alcohol, the presence of erosive and/or atrophic areas, infection with candida, HCV, HPV, and immunosuppression as significant cofactors. Patients with OLP with these risk co-factors are at risk of malignant transformation should, therefore be followed up for an extensive period or even for life.
Ribeiro Jorge Luciana da Cruz, Ormiga Fabiola, Neves Aline, Lopes Ricardo Tadeu,
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 5, pp 001-004; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001023

Abstract:
Introduction: In endodontically treated teeth, dentinal defects such as microcracks can progress to a vertical root fracture and lead to tooth loss. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate, by micro-computed tomography analysis, the formation of dentinal microcracks during filling removal in endodontic retreatment of root canals filled with gutta-percha and Total Fill BC bioceramic sealer. Methods: Twenty mesial roots of mandibular molars were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and Total Fill BC sealer and then the filling material was removed with rotary Protaper Retreatment files. The specimens were scanned before instrumentation, after filling and after retreatment. The transversal images obtained after filling were compared with the images obtained after removal of the filling material. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Among the 24.444 cross-sections analyzed, 5.67% presented some type of dentinal defect, with 0.51% in the initial images, 2.58% in the post-filling images and 2.58% in the post-retreatment images. All the dentinal defects identified in the images obtained after the retreatment were already present in the corresponding images after the filling. New dentinal microcracks were not observed after removal of the filling material. Conclusion: Retreatment of mesial roots of mandibular molars filled with a silicate-based root canal filling material do not influence the formation of dentinal microcracks.
Wang Cheng-Yi,
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 4, pp 030-031; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001022

Abstract:
Stability of esthetic implant buccal soft and hard tissue contour using freeze-dried bone allograft in early implant placement with contour augmentation.
Vimal Jyotsna, Jurel Sunit Kumar, , Chand Pooran
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 4, pp 028-029; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001021

Abstract:
Maxillofacial defects are very common and can be due to congenital defect, trauma, infections and neoplasms of facial region. These defects can be restored using different materials and retention methods to give a life like appearance. Rehabilitation of facial defect is a very challenging task. Every good prosthesis needs a skillful hand and it all starts with making a good impression of that defect and to proceed with the same. The aim of present paper was to present a simplified approach for the fabrication of custom tray to take facial impression of the patient with maxillofacial defect.
Fisher Jeanine, Porter Graham, Graham Stuart, Ziaras Christos, Woodcock Andrew D,
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 4, pp 009-014; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001016

Elangovan Ramnath, Theyagarajan Ramakrishnan, Mani Ebenezer, Amaladhas Mejalla Muthiah
Journal of Clinical Advances in Dentistry, Volume 3, pp 023-026; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.jcad.1001012

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